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Need Tough Love Advice

Posted
by hawkeyefan hawkeyefan (New) New

I am writing in hopes that there are some seasoned veterans out there than can give me some tough love advice about what direction to take my nursing career.

Here is a little bit about my nursing background:

Started out with my LPN and did long term care as well as clinic work in endocrinology and OB/GYN. Graduated with my RN in 2013 and remained in OB/GYN clinic until recently due to poor clinic pay. I started on a Med/Surg floor at a smaller hospital as a staff nurse in May.

My dilemma is that I will complete my 90 day probationary period this week at my current staff nurse position and to be honest I know it is not for me. I dread going to work everyday and feel stressed my entire shift almost every single day. I unfortunately work 8hr evening shifts which means I have to be at work quite often to get my full time pay.

I have been speaking with an HR staff member at a local telemedicine clinic about assisting with virtual assessments. Hours would be more regular and no weekends or holidays. I am currently working on my BSN and hope to graduate next year.

Bottom line:

Would I be killing my career by leaving the hospital setting? Please be honest....I can take it!

Try and hang in there. You really do need that acute care experience. Especially if you are thinking of virtually assessing patients. Even with your BSN which is awesome, you will need to have that 1-2 years of acute care/hospital experience for most jobs.

Jensmom7, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice. Has 36 years experience.

Would it be possible for you to drop down to PT status at the hospital and do the tele assessment job on your days off?

Nonyvole, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency.

Killing your career? No. Giving you potential difficulties? Yes.

There are many options for non - hospital jobs, as you well know. However, you may want to think about just why you aren't happy - the unit culture? Patient ratios? Time management?

Also, do you have any career goals, especially after you have your BSN?

Difficulties that come to mind are really more along the line of what ifs.

So, I'd suggest sitting down and making a pro/con list of staying vs. going. Plus, you've been talking with the HR rep, bit do you have an actual offer?

Good luck.

You would be if you aren't going to be satisfied with your remaining career options.

LTC and clinic didn't work out. You don't like med surg. Telemedicine might not work out pay or job satisfaction wise. Then what? Home health? You might not like the hours and pressure that come with that either. What else will you be marketable for?

Putting aside not wanting to work weekends and holidays and the normal learning curve, if you make personal life accommodations for the next 9-15 mos, drop the work life balance expectation, focus on good self care (sleep, exercise, relaxation, diet) and scheduling short periods of self study, is your working environment unsafe? If not, could you look at it as more of an internship with good pay to better position yourself for the remainder of your career?

Definitely unit morale is very low....almost every nurse on the floor seems or verbalizes that they are unhappy. It is quite a negative environment but I realize that a lot of things are what you make it. It is hard to stay positive when you feel like you are drowning due to patient ratios most shifts. Thank you for the idea of a pros/cons list. That is an excellent idea.

loriangel14, RN

Specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

I'd go for it. Why not?

You make some great points and it may seem that I was unhappy in my previous clinic positions which is not the case. Unfortunately where I live clinic nurses make very little and due to some health issues in my household making more money was necessary. Your advice about looking at it as a pathway to a greater good is solid and I have been trying to remind myself of that. It's just so easy sometimes to get wrapped up in the right now and at least seven more months of this is often hard to swallow. Thank you for your reply!

loriangel14, RN

Specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

There is no reason to stick with something you don't like. There's nothing worse than dreading work. Life is short. Do what makes you happy.

I agree that life is short and I personally enjoy what I do, however all options remained open to me until I figured out what it was I wanted.

Life is short, but so is 9 months. Quitting at 3 mos and reducing your options (when you haven't yet nailed down what you want to do, other than getting out of what you're currently doing) is like quitting school before your last 2 semesters.

On the other hand, if you know what you want long term and either are or can be qualified, then go for it.

Edited by Libby1987

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

I'd be miserable if I had to report to work five evening shifts per week in a negative environment. Not would would I feel as if I was at work all the time, but I'd also feel an everlasting sense of dread. In addition, acute care isn't for me.

I'd jump at the chance for the telemedicine clinic position. Then again, it is different strokes for different folks. Good luck with whatever you decide.

Maybe you could go prn at your current job and go for the new job. Working 5 days a week on a med surg floor is a slow death for me. Hats off to you for lasting this long!

Sent from my iPhone using allnurses

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

I agree that life is short and I personally enjoy what I do, however all options remained open to me until I figured out what it was I wanted.

Life is short, but so is 9 months. Quitting at 3 mos and reducing your options (when you haven't yet nailed down what you want to do, other than getting out of what you're currently doing) is like quitting school before your last 2 semesters.

On the other hand, if you know what you want long term and either are or can be qualified, then go for it.

I agree with this. Hang in there for at least one year off orientation. You may find (as I did) that you actually LIKE your job once you become competent at it. You haven't been there long enough to be competent.