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Need help with this vague patient safety question.

Safety   (3,911 Views 14 Comments)
by obfuscate obfuscate (New Member) New Member

973 Visitors; 10 Posts

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"How can you ensure the patient's safety in the hospital?"

What would be the best answer to this question?

My answer would be to follow the hospital's policies and procedures to ensure the patient's safety. In addition, I would perform within the scope of practice defined in the competency standards for the registered nurse, that is, to perform activities which the nurse is educated and authorised to perform. Such activities would include educating and orientating the patient to the ward/hospital, following the 5 rights of medication administration and so on.

Am I in the right track? What would be your answer?

Thanks for your time.

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9,128 Visitors; 672 Posts

Definitely on the right track, IDK this answer could go on for 20 pages or more. There are a lot of things that you'd do to provide for a patients safety in general, monitor vital signs, monitor for medication reactions, monitor for s/s of condition worsening, respiratory distress, cardiac complications, GI and DVT prophylaxis, advocate for patient alert them to signs/symptoms of adverse reactions/allergies, fall risk preventions...the list could go on and on and on and on.

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1,824 Visitors; 61 Posts

There are "National Patient Safety Goals" that might give you some insight

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Sun0408 has 4 years experience and works as a RN.

35,796 Visitors; 1,761 Posts

Another safety issue in hospital and LTC facilities is falls.. So bed in low position, bed alarm if pt score warrant one in use. Making sure side rails are up, brakes are in the locked position. Having the call bell in reach can aid them if they need help getting up etc.. Yeah, this topic can go on and on.. Don't forget clutter, equipment, lines etc they all add to pt risks.

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19,704 Visitors; 2,227 Posts

hand washing

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FLArn has 20 years experience and works as a Hospice.

10,569 Visitors; 503 Posts

Except in long term care Side rails are a restraint and require MD orders and are only allowed if PT / OT eval determine they are the "least restrictive" available effective device.

So I'd stay away from being too specific.

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5,662 Visitors; 344 Posts

"What would be your answer?"

As a nurse and also a patient (with a less than desirable outcomes following several procedures)

my honest answer is to have patient have an advocate in their room with them 24/7, preferably someone with some medical knowledge. The truth is, medical mistakes happen everyday, some cost people their lives.

With some of the current staffing levels, care is just sometimes lacking. When my family member or best friend are in the hospital, I have someone to stay with them 24/7. I personally also would not be admitted to a hospital that did not have a bar-code scanning system. :twocents:

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34,320 Visitors; 6,372 Posts

Expedite their discharge.

This is a genuine response, not a sarcastic one. The hospital is a hazardous place to be. Even with the best of care, patients are at risk for infection, accidents, medical mistakes, financial hardship, loss of independence, social isolation, etc.

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Lizzie21 has 4 years experience and works as a Maternal/Newborn Nursing.

5,236 Visitors; 204 Posts

Also you could say to make sure that cords and other hazards are properly placed and out of the way. Ensuring that the pt has proper socks with grips on the feet, bed is in the lowest position, cleaning up wet spills, ect.

You are on the right path!

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8,163 Visitors; 784 Posts

The best safety advice is to get your loved one out of that germ ridden environment as soon as possible before an attending can find more diagnoses to prescribe for! The healthiest patients I have ever had were the ones that NEVER saw a doctor before thier last hospitalization. And some of the sickest were of the same mindset.

My point being: Who the heck knows?

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1,157 Visitors; 28 Posts

This is a ridiculous question. Your nursing instructor is wasting your time by making you answer this.

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