Jump to content

Need Advice...

Nurses   (914 Views 10 Comments)
by KarmaComesAround KarmaComesAround (Member)

KarmaComesAround has 5 years experience and specializes in ICU, Telemetry, Neuro, Ortho, Med/Surg.

3,195 Profile Views; 72 Posts

I have applied for several jobs at a local hospital. It is a very competitive from what I am finding out...it is a Magnet hospital and has a "slow turnover" from what someone told me. I have not heard back from a few positions I have applied for (med/surg or cardiac units). I take the NCLEX next week, so I began to panic somewhat today since I have not heard anything, so I applied for a job on the psychiatric unit that opened up. I may eventually want to go work in a psych unit (or that is what I thought I wanted to do before nursing school, but found out I really enjoyed med/surg more except for the mental health OP center). I really think I need to start out in med/surg. Well, after I applied for this job, I heard back within 1-2 hrs of applying. I was shocked. They left a message to call back and set up an interview (I am calling them in the AM). Now, I am wondering what I should do. Should I tell them I changed my mind, and I eventually may want to transfer to behavioral health, but I have thought about it a good bit and decided I needed to start med/surg for at least a year? I feel really bad for applying, then changing my mind after I thought about it this afternoon. What do I do or say? Do you think it is best to start med/surg for at least a year?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RNDreamer specializes in acute care.

1,237 Posts; 15,702 Profile Views

I think you should start out doing what you want to do, not what other people think you should do....Me, personally, if I get an offer on a specialty unit, esp the NICU, I'm going for it...but I may apply for a med/surg position and just do that per diem for a year...that's just me....also I've applied for jobs, then changed my mind when called for an interview..I see nothing wrong with that...on the interview, why don't you ask them about being able to transfer to another unit, then decide whether or not your still want to start in the psych unit...remember, they just called you for an inerview, they didn't offer anything yet so don't feel bad about having doubts now...good luck with your decision

I have applied for several jobs at a local hospital. It is a very competitive from what I am finding out...it is a Magnet hospital and has a "slow turnover" from what someone told me. I have not heard back from a few positions I have applied for (med/surg or cardiac units). I take the NCLEX next week, so I began to panic somewhat today since I have not heard anything, so I applied for a job on the psychiatric unit that opened up. I may eventually want to go work in a psych unit (or that is what I thought I wanted to do before nursing school, but found out I really enjoyed med/surg more except for the mental health OP center). I really think I need to start out in med/surg. Well, after I applied for this job, I heard back within 1-2 hrs of applying. I was shocked. They left a message to call back and set up an interview (I am calling them in the AM). Now, I am wondering what I should do. Should I tell them I changed my mind, and I eventually may want to transfer to behavioral health, but I have thought about it a good bit and decided I needed to start med/surg for at least a year? I feel really bad for applying, then changing my mind after I thought about it this afternoon. What do I do or say? Do you think it is best to start med/surg for at least a year?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

3 Followers; 36,785 Posts; 96,988 Profile Views

You can always change your mind. But heaven forbid this be the only interview offer you get! I would go to the interview (and any others that come about) and if you feel comfortable enough, ask about interdepartmental transfers after employment. Good luck with your job search.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nursenpnk is a RN and specializes in MSICU starting PICU.

56 Posts; 2,064 Profile Views

Starting out as a new nurse is an exciting time, I have been a nurse for a year and I remember my interview process. I had to turn down multiple hospitals that I had applied for due to my decision making and desire to make the best choice for me and my future nurisng profession. Go with the position that you will feel will best fit you and don't feel bad about turning down a position. In response to NY Dreamer's comment, I wouldn't advise doing per diem your first year, in fact most places want you to have a solid year if not more before doing this as you are not constantly in the hospital environment developing the necessary skills. Best of luck to the both of you in your nursing career :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RNDreamer specializes in acute care.

1,237 Posts; 15,702 Profile Views

hmmm, you do make a valid point about having a year's exp...didn't think about that...thanks

Starting out as a new nurse is an exciting time, I have been a nurse for a year and I remember my interview process. I had to turn down multiple hospitals that I had applied for due to my decision making and desire to make the best choice for me and my future nurisng profession. Go with the position that you will feel will best fit you and don't feel bad about turning down a position. In response to NY Dreamer's comment, I wouldn't advise doing per diem your first year, in fact most places want you to have a solid year if not more before doing this as you are not constantly in the hospital environment developing the necessary skills. Best of luck to the both of you in your nursing career :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wren specializes in Oncology, Hospice, Research.

201 Posts; 3,591 Profile Views

Go to the interview. You NEVER know how these things will turn out. You may walk in and decide this is your dream job. Or you may realize it is not a good fit for you (or you aren't a good fit for them). At the very minimum it will give you practice and experience interviewing. Trust me, folks are used to interviewing nurses who decide they aren't really that interested or find a better fit somewhere else. They won't take it personally. ;)

Good luck! :nurse:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dolce is a RN and specializes in Day Surgery, Agency, Cath Lab, LTC/Psych.

861 Posts; 8,391 Profile Views

Go to the interview, it is good practice! I started out in Psych/LTC as a new grad and had no problem adjusting to other areas of nursing after I found out that it wasn't for me. While a year of med/surg experience is valuable for every new grad, it is not a requirement. Not every nurse needs it. If you really like the psych position then go for it. You'll learn lots and lots in psych, its just that it will be different than med/surg skills. You will still be giving meds, performing assessments, dressing changes, catheters, admissions, etc. You will learn very valuable interaction and communication skills with clients that will provide an excellent base for where ever your career takes you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Radnurse54 has 33 years experience and specializes in Emergency Department/Radiology.

69 Posts; 2,971 Profile Views

I started out as a Psych Nurse when I got out of nursing school. As a GN I found the experience very valuable when it came time to take my state board exams, of course in the "olden days" we took a specific exam for each area ie: Medical, Surgical, OB, Peds etc.

Interviewing for a job is like dating before you get married, you dont always choose the first one you come to because it might not be the best fit for you. I assure you as a manager I would rather interview someone and they decline the job, than have to put a new employee on probation or worse because it wasnt working out well, or put a lot of time into training them and then they leave. This is about YOUR career, YOUR life that should be your first prioriety.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

1,343 Posts; 5,653 Profile Views

Go to the interview. You NEVER know how these things will turn out. You may walk in and decide this is your dream job. Or you may realize it is not a good fit for you (or you aren't a good fit for them). At the very minimum it will give you practice and experience interviewing. Trust me, folks are used to interviewing nurses who decide they aren't really that interested or find a better fit somewhere else. They won't take it personally. ;)

Good luck! :nurse:

Actually, they just might get aggravated and not want to talk to her again in the future. You never know.

That said, I have no idea how to advise you, OP, but pray for God to clearly guide and direct you to the best position He has for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MrChicagoRN has 30 years experience as a RN and specializes in Leadership, Psych, HomeCare, Amb. Care.

2,589 Posts; 28,393 Profile Views

Go to the interview. You NEVER know how these things will turn out. You may walk in and decide this is your dream job. Or you may realize it is not a good fit for you (or you aren't a good fit for them). At the very minimum it will give you practice and experience interviewing. Trust me, folks are used to interviewing nurses who decide they aren't really that interested or find a better fit somewhere else. They won't take it personally. ;)

Good luck! :nurse:

+1

You can go to the interview and be honest.

You are exploring a number of different options, and are trying to decide between different clinical areas. Nothing wrong with that.

Let them get to know you, be prepared to ask questions about the position.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×