2nd degree in nursing WAS IT WORTH IT? GIRL LOST!

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mamacashew

mamacashew

53 Posts

I currently teach at a community college, and it is that same college that I will start nursing school in the fall. Yes, I still plan to teach while in school and even after I'm done and hopefully working as a nurse.

Most community colleges and desperate (at least the one I work at) for adjuncts. It's cheaper to hire and pay an adjunct that a full-timer.

You have to look at what interests you the most. You probably won't be able to teach at a 4-year college with just a masters degree and adjunct pay at a community college isn't anything to write home about!

mizfradd, CNA

Specializes in med/surg, psych, public health. Has 11 years experience. 295 Posts

Ask me no questions and I'll tell you no lies.

:smokin:

Ok, truth or dare...

and no disrespect intended, but I've heard that it's the same thing as a "dingleberry"?! :eek:

nyteshade, BSN

Specializes in Legal, Ortho, Rehab. Has 19 years experience. 553 Posts

OP, you really need to compare the pros and cons of both, and decide which is the lesser evil. Personally, nursing can be extremely stressful. Just search "panic before work" or "anxiety before work" within this site and you'll see what I mean.

I understand being a professor is no walk in the park, but I just can't imagine a college professor throwing up before work (unless one had a severe public speaking fear).

Graceland200

Graceland200

27 Posts

What about occupational therapy...it requires the same pre-reqs as nursing, has lots of jobs and is a masters.

Fribblet

Fribblet

839 Posts

Ok, truth or dare...

and no disrespect intended, but I've heard that it's the same thing as a "dingleberry"?! :eek:

People probably call me a "dingleberry" as I'm rather blunt and have a low tolerance for stupidity. It tends to get people's panties in a bunch.

Otherwise, I'm going with dare.

AlynnSN

AlynnSN

34 Posts

I can't really say much about the teaching but coming from being a patient myself in the hospital and being in clinical 2 days a week for 8 hours a day with sick patients, I wouldn't want a non passionate nurse. They are NOT fun to be around and can make the day seem foorrrrevvverrrr.

"Rolling through the motions" should not be used in the same sentence as "Nurse" , although sadly, they are too often :(

You said you wanted opinions and that's mine.

PostOpPrincess

PostOpPrincess, BSN, RN

Specializes in M/S, MICU, CVICU, SICU, ER, Trauma, NICU. Has 19 years experience. 2,211 Posts

People probably call me a "dingleberry" as I'm rather blunt and have a low tolerance for stupidity. It tends to get people's panties in a bunch.

Otherwise, I'm going with dare.

Hmmm...that's interesting. I think I might steal your name and use it at work, for I also happen to be a "dingleberry" and not suffer fools gladly.

Hope you don't mind?

NickB

NickB

Specializes in NICU Transport/NICU. Has 4 years experience. 199 Posts

Why not kill two birds with one stone and teach Nursing?

anonymurse

anonymurse

979 Posts

Or just do nursing. You'll do more real teaching at the bedside in a day than you could standing in front of a semester's worth of yawning teenaged freshmen.

mariposabella

mariposabella

356 Posts

Honestly, teaching is not an easier or more profitable alternative to nursing.

If you want to teach "college" (community college or 4-year university), you probably need a PhD. You might get hired at a CC with just a master's, but it's a terrible job. Adjuncting is not rewarding and definitely not profitable.

To work at a 4-year university, you need a PhD, tons of published research papers, and to be a prodigy in your field (especially in the liberal arts). And even then, you won't make very good money or have job security for a very long time.

If money is your primary concern (there's nothing wrong with that), you need a third option.

I agree, at the CC that I go to they are always looking for professors (especially for the math and science classes), but no one wants to teach because of the crap pay. Also last year they forced professors to work more hours with no increase in their salaries and a lot of the professors I have have PhD's. I really dont think any degree guarantees you a job in the field you get your degree in.

cwa82

cwa82

19 Posts

Never really considered teaching but I just graduated from a second-degree BSN program. Was it worth it? I’m only a few weeks into my first job (surgical floor at a community hospital), so time will tell. I’m passionate about nursing, and so far I like what I do. Moreover, I’m proud of what I do. But you know, the grass is always greener. I hated my job as an administrative assistant back in the day, but I also got to leave the building and take a real lunch break, never had to worry about accidentally killing anyone, and had every weekend and holiday off! Nursing is stressful (especially when you are new), and physically and mentally tiring. But I think (so far, with my tiny bit of experience), that it is worth it if it’s something that you are really interested in.

That being said, the job market is crap today – especially for new nurses. I was very lucky to land a good job so quickly. I still think it’s better than it is for teachers, however. While I’m not rolling in money, I definitely get paid more than I would doing anything with my first degree (foreign language). And I think with some good experience under your belt (and hopefully a change in the job market), you can do a lot with a BSN. I can move almost anywhere and have a decent shot at getting a job. There are lots of other options out there aside from bedside nursing, should I tire of that. And someday, I could perhaps teach (clinical educator, nursing school, etc.). Ultimately, I think that you can do more with a BSN than you can with a teaching degree. Just my thoughts as a very new nurse – but ultimately, you have to do whatever you feel will work best for YOU.

steelcityrn

steelcityrn, RN

964 Posts

Very competative to find a great job at a university. I know someone with a ABD degree, but since he branched off and taught many online courses(english) for several online universities, he was able to get a high paying job at a large university with a new title "digital technical specialist", which is basically setting up their online program, which is the future of teaching. Of course it comes with all the perks a nurse will never see(unless a school nurse which is low pay).