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NCLEX help

NCLEX   (808 Views | 12 Replies)
by Student02 Student02 (New) New Student

126 Profile Views; 8 Posts

I've failed NCLEX twice. I finished school in September of 2019, took my first exam on Dec.17 in hopes of starting the year fresh and unfortunately did not pass. I used Kaplan which I feel like I learned nothing from and mark klimek which is a little outdated but did helped me remember some content. I completely blanked first attempt and dont remember absolutely nothing from that first exam, I knew I failed but was still devastated. I took a bit to myself and then tried it all over again. I set my test date for March.17 & due to covid I had to reschedule to yesterday, May 26. I was so confident this time around. I used UWorld, I even tested a high chance of passing NCLEX on their practice exam for NCLEX. I just dont know what to do now, I feel so unmotivated, I feel like I'm never going to get it. I was so confident this time and to see the words " fail " on the laptop just destroy me. I dont want to do it again, I dont know what else to study. I can tell I've made progress in my learning but obviously it's not good enough. I need help, I cant even afford to do all this, I'm lucky to have my mom and boyfriend by my side through all of this, helping me. I dont know what else to study. I did all UWorld questions, even multiple times. Anyone have any recommendations? I'm just so drained at this point and dont know what else to try..

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AspiringRN has 3 years experience as a CNA, LPN and specializes in Geriatrics.

34 Posts; 594 Profile Views

I took my test today for the NCLEX pn.

This is my first time taking it.

If you failed, you’ll just have to keep practicing. I studied mostly UWorld and Saunders book.

I did over 100 practice questions a day and thoroughly read the rationales. I would go back and constantly review the bank. When I ran out of questions with both Saunders and UWorld I looked for more practice questions to do on different sites. In my opinion there’s no such thing as too many questions.

Good luck! I hope you passed!

 

 

 

 

 

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nurse_00100110 has 5 years experience as a ADN, BSN.

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Dear Lizzy, 

I truly understand how you feel. I also failed the NCLEX-RN when I took it. 

I waited about 30 days after I graduated to take my exam, Some people in my class only waited a week and they passed with the minimum amount of questions (they were extremely smart and I was happy for them that they had passed). 

I took ALL the questions and that took me little over 3 hours to complete. I had a gut feeling that I failed it and when I got the NCLEX letter, I was not surprised. It still hurt bad. I did ALL the Kaplan Tests and quizzes and readiness tests. I sat everyday for hours on end at the kitchen table. I did feel like a failure. 

I do like Kaplan and how they taught to avoid some pitfalls e.g. Dont answer with "Why". And I still have never asked my patient "why" in any of my questions / nursing practice because I truly believe in the rational Kaplan provides. I believe I failed, because I was trying to use a brute force method of answering as many questions as possible to learn the test. That strategy might work for some, but it failed me. 

Everybody is going to be different on what works for them. What worked for me is changing my approach on how I study and where I study. I mostly Saunders as my study resource, made my own quizzes via quizlet from the Saunders material, and took practice exams / quizzes at my local library. My local library has computers where you can reserve a computer, so I had to get up in the morning and drive and took a practice exam / quizzes there. I tried to make it realistic as if I was actually driving to take the NCLEX (because I have really bad test anxiety) and get out of my comfort zone of the kitchen table. I had to understand that the NCLEX-RN is a safety exam and that they want to know that you will practice safely as a nurse. I did not use the brute force method of taking as many questions as possible to solely rely on, I did not use Kaplan as nearly as much because I had already done it. I have not tried UWorld or any other except for Saunders. 

The advice I got from my nursing instructors after I failed the NCLEX-RN, schedule to take it as soon as possible and believe. I made my 2nd attempt 45 days later and took 75 questions. I felt nervously OK when my test ended. I didn't feel like celebrating or telling anyone that I only took 75 questions, I did not want to talk to anyone at all - It was a hold my breath until I got my results sort of deal. I did not use the whole credit-card retry attempt to see if I had passed. I just waited for my results.

My advice, is similar, schedule to take it as soon as possible, put your social life on complete and utter hold (even if that means no more boyfriend for a month or two), believe that this exam will be harder than any other exam in your entire life, but most important, trust and believe in yourself. 

 

 

 

 

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8 Posts; 126 Profile Views

12 hours ago, AspiringRN said:

I took my test today for the NCLEX pn.

This is my first time taking it.

If you failed, you’ll just have to keep practicing. I studied mostly UWorld and Saunders book.

I did over 100 practice questions a day and thoroughly read the rationales. I would go back and constantly review the bank. When I ran out of questions with both Saunders and UWorld I looked for more practice questions to do on different sites. In my opinion there’s no such thing as too many questions.

Good luck! I hope you passed!

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you, I have both most recent editions of Saunders,  I'm going to start using that along with my UWorld. I hope you passed your exam ! 

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11 hours ago, nurse_00100110 said:

Dear Lizzy, 

I truly understand how you feel. I also failed the NCLEX-RN when I took it. 

I waited about 30 days after I graduated to take my exam, Some people in my class only waited a week and they passed with the minimum amount of questions (they were extremely smart and I was happy for them that they had passed). 

I took ALL the questions and that took me little over 3 hours to complete. I had a gut feeling that I failed it and when I got the NCLEX letter, I was not surprised. It still hurt bad. I did ALL the Kaplan Tests and quizzes and readiness tests. I sat everyday for hours on end at the kitchen table. I did feel like a failure. 

I do like Kaplan and how they taught to avoid some pitfalls e.g. Dont answer with "Why". And I still have never asked my patient "why" in any of my questions / nursing practice because I truly believe in the rational Kaplan provides. I believe I failed, because I was trying to use a brute force method of answering as many questions as possible to learn the test. That strategy might work for some, but it failed me. 

Everybody is going to be different on what works for them. What worked for me is changing my approach on how I study and where I study. I mostly Saunders as my study resource, made my own quizzes via quizlet from the Saunders material, and took practice exams / quizzes at my local library. My local library has computers where you can reserve a computer, so I had to get up in the morning and drive and took a practice exam / quizzes there. I tried to make it realistic as if I was actually driving to take the NCLEX (because I have really bad test anxiety) and get out of my comfort zone of the kitchen table. I had to understand that the NCLEX-RN is a safety exam and that they want to know that you will practice safely as a nurse. I did not use the brute force method of taking as many questions as possible to solely rely on, I did not use Kaplan as nearly as much because I had already done it. I have not tried UWorld or any other except for Saunders. 

The advice I got from my nursing instructors after I failed the NCLEX-RN, schedule to take it as soon as possible and believe. I made my 2nd attempt 45 days later and took 75 questions. I felt nervously OK when my test ended. I didn't feel like celebrating or telling anyone that I only took 75 questions, I did not want to talk to anyone at all - It was a hold my breath until I got my results sort of deal. I did not use the whole credit-card retry attempt to see if I had passed. I just waited for my results.

My advice, is similar, schedule to take it as soon as possible, put your social life on complete and utter hold (even if that means no more boyfriend for a month or two), believe that this exam will be harder than any other exam in your entire life, but most important, trust and believe in yourself. 

 

 

 

 

I appreciate your response, & I think that's where I'm messing up also. I read the question and answers and pick what I feel is best in the moment and move on. I feel like if I dont know it I dont try as hard as I should to figure it out. As I said in another response I have 2 of the recent editions of Saunders that I'm going to include in my studying. & yes I understand completely with the social life and boyfriend. I'm lucky that he understands that I have to study. & I held off on doing the testing process all over again yesterday when I found out I didn't pass but I'm going to do that today. Thank you so much.

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Natasha has 1 years experience as a CNA, LVN and specializes in Psych.

1,673 Posts; 30,389 Profile Views

 

watch 5-10 minute videos or read your medsurg book, A&P, patho. Review the normal heartbeat conduction system first, then review normal potassium and expected cardiac symptoms, abnormal potassium and expected cardiac symptoms. the prior knowledge you learn must build 

 

Saunders is a great tool. unfortunately many including myself just was not taught HOW to study the 77 chapter book

UWorld is great too. I used UWorld when it was $45.00 in 2016. However, If I had to do it all over again Saunders is a great book to use as well. 

In conclusion, to answer this question you will need to have prior knowledge

Find a study partner, tutor or learn how to help you break the questions down.  

Hope this helps 🙂
 
 

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londonflo has 43 years experience and specializes in oncology.

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Do any of you contact your school/faculty member for help or ideas on studying?

At a school I taught at, the few failing scores we had correlated with not doing well on the first two courses of nursing content -- foundations. By not doing well, I mean the students had a couple of D's on tests but did pass, albeit with a low C.  That makes sense because every thing is built on the foundation of safety and quality care.  

When I have helped students who failed I hear the same prep as mentioned here. Lots of test taking and answering questions for weeks before the test. I have  suggested to students do a self-assessment of what they know well and don't feel so confident on. For example look at major categories and diagnoses. For example...do you feel a little shaky on neuro? Get out your book and read the chapter. And then read it again. You yourself know what you don't really know.  Be honest with yourself.

Hopefully the studying will pay off and you will all see "pass" on your next results.

 

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1 hour ago, londonflo said:

Do any of you contact your school/faculty member for help or ideas on studying?

At a school I taught at, the few failing scores we had correlated with not doing well on the first two courses of nursing content -- foundations. By not doing well, I mean the students had a couple of D's on tests but did pass, albeit with a low C.  That makes sense because every thing is built on the foundation of safety and quality care.  

When I have helped students who failed I hear the same prep as mentioned here. Lots of test taking and answering questions for weeks before the test. I have  suggested to students do a self-assessment of what they know well and don't feel so confident on. For example look at major categories and diagnoses. For example...do you feel a little shaky on neuro? Get out your book and read the chapter. And then read it again. You yourself know what you don't really know.  Be honest with yourself.

Hopefully the studying will pay off and you will all see "pass" on your next results.

 

Unfortunately the school I graduated from was taken over by a new Director of Nursing who was absolutely no help. I did so well in the beginning of my school term with some amazing teachers who dont teach there anymore. The new director was our teacher for the rest of our nursing classes such as critical care, leadership, & we did nothing at all but busy work. Me and other classmates used to constantly ask her for stuff to study and ideas to help study and it was never met through. But I am going to start going through books such as the Saunders to learn more in detail of maybe what I struggle with. Thank you I hope I see a pass as well 

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londonflo has 43 years experience and specializes in oncology.

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2 hours ago, Student02 said:

But I am going to start going through books such as the Saunders

I haven't looked at Saunders in years but I remember it as more of an outline format. Did you have textbooks for Medical-Surgical, Maternity, etc.?

I am curious if you had any kind of comprehensive exams and topic exams placed throughout the curriculum. Sometimes those tests give you some ideas of where to study. One faculty member taught an awful lot of the curriculum. Was this a for-profit school?

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16 hours ago, londonflo said:

I haven't looked at Saunders in years but I remember it as more of an outline format. Did you have textbooks for Medical-Surgical, Maternity, etc.?

I am curious if you had any kind of comprehensive exams and topic exams placed throughout the curriculum. Sometimes those tests give you some ideas of where to study. One faculty member taught an awful lot of the curriculum. Was this a for-profit school?

I do have majority of my class text books, either paper or ebook yes, & it wasnt any big college, it was more of the smaller career college.

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londonflo has 43 years experience and specializes in oncology.

99 Posts; 341 Profile Views

4 hours ago, Student02 said:

have majority of my class text books, either paper or ebook yes, & it wasnt any big college, it was more of the smaller career college.

Build on those strengths you have from your first semesters and trust that you will "fill-in-the-blanks". It is a shame that your school doesn't give more support to its students. Best wishes on your passing your next NCLEX try. We need you in the profession! 

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3 hours ago, londonflo said:

Build on those strengths you have from your first semesters and trust that you will "fill-in-the-blanks". It is a shame that your school doesn't give more support to its students. Best wishes on your passing your next NCLEX try. We need you in the profession! 

Will do, Thank you so much.

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