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Nauseous vs Nauseated (another grammar lesson)

Nurses   (20,749 Views | 108 Replies)

Emergent has 25 years experience .

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If you really want to be correct, you will use nauseated, not nauseous, when describing the state of being afflicted with nausea. Nauseous, on the other hand, is really supposed to be used to describe something or someone that causes nausea.

We nurses can do a lot to turn around the deplorable trend amongst the common populace to use these words incorrectly. We deal with nauseated people on a daily basis. We can gently educate the public by being role models for proper usage!

(nauseous-correct usage): The smell of rotten eggs is nauseous.

(nauseated-correct usage): The smell of rotten eggs makes me nauseated.

http://www.grammarerrors.com/word-choice/nauseousnauseated/

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OCNRN63 is a RN and specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

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I thought I was the only one who stuck to this rule.

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nynursey_ has 3 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg/ICU/Stepdown.

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Pet peeve: "he's alert and orientated."

:banghead:

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VivaLasViejas has 20 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych.

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I used to hate the term "perseverated".....until I encountered patients who did it. :facepalm:

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psu_213 has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant.

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Now our "pre fab" discharge instructions say "Return to the ED if you become nauseous." That makes me nauseated!

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psu_213 has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant.

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orientated

Uh oh, here we go….

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icuRNmaggie has 24 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU.

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I would like to vent about the misuse of the word impacted.

Impact is a noun not a verb. ( There was a huge crash upon impact.)

Impacted is an adjective. (He has an impacted fracture of the tibia.)

It sounds dumb when newscasters ask people "how has this impacted you?"

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60 Posts; 2,999 Profile Views

I would like to vent about the misuse of the word impacted.

Impact is a noun not a verb. ( There was a huge crash upon impact.)

Impacted is an adjective. (He has an impacted fracture of the tibia.)

It sounds dumb when newscasters ask people "how has this impacted you?"

When this started I totally thought you were going to talk about poop.

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Mr. Murse has 7 years experience and specializes in critical care.

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I would like to vent about the misuse of the word impacted.

Impact is a noun not a verb. ( There was a huge crash upon impact.)

Impacted is an adjective. (He has an impacted fracture of the tibia.)

It sounds dumb when newscasters ask people "how has this impacted you?"

Not to be argumentative but you're wrong about this one, look up the definition. Impact can be either a noun or a verb.

(from Merriam-Webster)

noun: : the act or force of one thing hitting another: a powerful or major influence or effect

verb: : to have a strong and often bad effect on (something or someone)

: to hit (something) with great force

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icuRNmaggie has 24 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU.

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When this started I totally thought you were going to talk about poop.

In that sense,

Impaction is a noun.

Impacted is an adjective.

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icuRNmaggie has 24 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU.

1,970 Posts; 25,369 Profile Views

Not to be argumentative but you're wrong about this one, look up the definition. Impact can be either a noun or a verb.

(from Merriam-Webster)

noun: : the act or force of one thing hitting another: a powerful or major influence or effect

verb: : to have a strong and often bad effect on (something or someone)

: to hit (something) with great force

I prefer the Oxford dictionary. The word impacted has been used incorrectly for so long that it has become accepted only in the US. It sounds stupid.

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newohiorn has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Acute care, Community Med, SANE, ASC.

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I used to hate the term "perseverated".....until I encountered patients who did it. :facepalm:

I love perseverate! To me it sounds just like what it is. :-)

My pet peeves: Advice vs. advise. People often come on AN asking for advise when they mean advice.

Also loose vs. lose. A person can lose ten pounds and then their pants might be loose. Many people use the word loose when they mean lose.

Last one and I see this one published all the time: I will try and get that done. Or I will try and remember where I left my keys. It should be try TO get it done and try TO remember.

Disclaimer: My grammar is far from perfect.

:-)

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