Messianic and Tassels (Tzitzit)

Posted
by FlameHeart FlameHeart, CNA Member

Specializes in Home Health Care. Has 4 years experience.

Shalom=Peace of God to you all!

I am a Christian which in Hebrew means Messianic and I follow everything The Holy Bible says including the commandment of God to wear Tassels (in Hebrew it means Tzitzit) with a cord or thread of blue in them on my clothing so that when I look it I will remember to keep all of his commandments and Law.

I also follow a literal, not Rabbinic or Traditional, interpretation of the kinds of clothing I am allowed to wear: basically natural fabrics only never of two different kinds meaning only 100% cotton scrubs for me!

My question is: have any of you ever had problems or difficulty with wearing Tzitzit or something that is commanded by your religion you must wear at all times in a visible way?

Wuzzie

4,812 Posts

As long as it doesn't present an infection transmission issue and a patient can't strangle you with it you should be fine. 

FlameHeart, CNA

Specializes in Home Health Care. Has 4 years experience. 77 Posts

8 hours ago, Wuzzie said:

As long as it doesn't present an infection transmission issue and a patient can't strangle you with it you should be fine. 

My tassels I wear on my scrub pants in the "loops" on them.

 

They are mostly covered up by my scrub tops, but are still visible about 12 inches long in total.

 

I wear 2 of them on either side of my scrub pants.

 

It would be hard for someone to strangle me with them as they would first have to rip them off my scrubs which are "smart scrubs.com" and are higher quality made.

Edited by ChristopherGllardoJr.

Wuzzie

4,812 Posts

1 hour ago, ChristopherGllardoJr. said:

They are mostly covered up by my scrub tops, but are still visible about 12 inches long in total.

You may have to tuck them in when doing some of your cares to avoid dragging them through various messes but otherwise I don’t see an issue. Unless you can’t tuck them in. 

FlameHeart, CNA

Specializes in Home Health Care. Has 4 years experience. 77 Posts

Just now, Wuzzie said:

You may have to tuck them in when doing some of your cares to avoid dragging them through various messes but otherwise I don’t see an issue. Unless you can’t tuck them in. 

Tucking them in is not an option, they exist so I must be able to "look" at them, at all times, and remember to keep all of God's Law and commandments.

Wuzzie

4,812 Posts

14 minutes ago, ChristopherGllardoJr. said:

Tucking them in is not an option, they exist so I must be able to "look" at them, at all times, and remember to keep all of God's Law and commandments.

I meant for just a minute or two if you are cleaning up a mess. There will be times you will not want anything of yours loose and dragging across a surface. Frankly if you are providing care to another human which very much follows God’s law I think keeping your tzitzit out of excrement is probably okay. 

FlameHeart, CNA

Specializes in Home Health Care. Has 4 years experience. 77 Posts

On 5/20/2021 at 4:20 PM, Wuzzie said:

I meant for just a minute or two if you are cleaning up a mess. There will be times you will not want anything of yours loose and dragging across a surface. Frankly if you are providing care to another human which very much follows God’s law I think keeping your tzitzit out of excrement is probably okay. 

I understand, yes I already that when using the toilet, so what you say makes sense.

Hannahbanana, BSN, MSN

Specializes in Physiology, CM, consulting, nsg edu, LNC, COB. Has 52 years experience. 1,183 Posts

I saw an interesting paper on infection risk with those colorful cloth stethoscope covers that were so trendy. Surprise, surprise, since these fomites weren’t taken off and laundered every day they carried all sorts of caca even if they weren’t visibly soiled and their users didn’t think they had been contaminated. Similar findings in a study of physicians’ ties, not laundered. This is why many hospitals don’t allow cloth steth covers or ties any more.

I urge you to consider your tassels in this light. If you launder them every time you go home, or have extra sets so some can be in the laundry (put them in a lingerie bag so the washing machine won’t trash them) and you can wear a clean dry set every day, then you’re in a good position to have them but not have them be a potential source of infection.

I would also urge you to have a discussion about this with a rabbi (even if you’re not Jewish), because many traditions related to religious observance are allowed to be suspended if doing them would be harmful, for examples, fasting for small children and sick people, or a prohibition against work on a Sabbath if the work is medically-related. There may be an acceptable equivalent that would please God, as I am pretty sure He wouldn’t want them to be a danger to a vulnerable person. 

 

amoLucia

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC. 7,735 Posts

HB - ahhhh,  FOMITES!!

FlameHeart, CNA

Specializes in Home Health Care. Has 4 years experience. 77 Posts

On 5/26/2021 at 10:55 AM, Hannahbanana said:

I saw an interesting paper on infection risk with those colorful cloth stethoscope covers that were so trendy. Surprise, surprise, since these fomites weren’t taken off and laundered every day they carried all sorts of caca even if they weren’t visibly soiled and their users didn’t think they had been contaminated. Similar findings in a study of physicians’ ties, not laundered. This is why many hospitals don’t allow cloth steth covers or ties any more.

I urge you to consider your tassels in this light. If you launder them every time you go home, or have extra sets so some can be in the laundry (put them in a lingerie bag so the washing machine won’t trash them) and you can wear a clean dry set every day, then you’re in a good position to have them but not have them be a potential source of infection.

I would also urge you to have a discussion about this with a rabbi (even if you’re not Jewish), because many traditions related to religious observance are allowed to be suspended if doing them would be harmful, for examples, fasting for small children and sick people, or a prohibition against work on a Sabbath if the work is medically-related. There may be an acceptable equivalent that would please God, as I am pretty sure He wouldn’t want them to be a danger to a vulnerable person. 

 

I follow God and Jesus, no one on Earth has the authority to say I don't have to keep his commandments, as this would put that person above God.

 

Yes, I wash my tzitzit aka tassels, they stay on the clothing I put them on and they are thick and cotton so they can be washed alongside the scrubs as harshly as I need to wash them.

 

I put hygiene as a high priority in patient care: that is why I have decided when I do get married I will not wear any rings, but the tattoos on my fingers will serve that purpose.

 

I know Jesus did say The Law of Mercy is higher than The Sabbath, to preserve life, but I think some people may use that as an excuse to overwork themselves.

 

I believe in emergencies, working on the Sabbath is OK, like working in The ER. I don't plan on working in The ER, so I don't plan on working on The Sabbath, unless for a short time I do work in The ER just to get the experience and skills.

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 43 years experience. 1,698 Posts

38 minutes ago, ChristopherGllardoJr. said:

I follow God and Jesus, no one on Earth has the authority to say I don't have to keep his commandments, as this would put that person above God.

 

Yes, I wash my tzitzit aka tassels, they stay on the clothing I put them on and they are thick and cotton so they can be washed alongside the scrubs as harshly as I need to wash them.

 

I put hygiene as a high priority in patient care: that is why I have decided when I do get married I will not wear any rings, but the tattoos on my fingers will serve that purpose.

 

I know Jesus did say The Law of Mercy is higher than The Sabbath, to preserve life, but I think some people may use that as an excuse to overwork themselves.

 

I believe in emergencies, working on the Sabbath is OK, like working in The ER. I don't plan on working in The ER, so I don't plan on working on The Sabbath, unless for a short time I do work in The ER just to get the experience and skills.

I'm a home care, private duty nurse. My clients need help 24/7; it doesn't have to be an emergency. It is lawful to do good on the Sabbath.

Is that how you see it?

I am so excited to see this question as a Hebrew believer in Yeshua myself, and a follower of YHVH's law. I thought I was the only one out there wondering about this topic.

Here is what I've come up with personally. I think I am going to get leather tassels or some other type of material that can be easily wiped clean. The only specific commandment is that they must contain blue, which you can even do with a dyed leather string. I also wear short tzitzits so they don't drag. 

Not that this specific topic is about working on the Shabbat, but I did want to say that even outside of the ER, many people need regular round-the-clock care because without it, their situation could become urgent or emergent. Some people on med-surg floors are recovering from surgery and not having nursing care is not an option. I agree that one has to leverage getting rest in accordance with the scriptures, and as much as humanly possible should be doing that on the Sabbath (the 7th day), but just like you couldn't not feed your cattle on the Sabbath because they need to be cared for, you wouldn't not work in a hospital if you were truly needed to care for the sick.