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medical terminology

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Im going to start nursing school after failing last year. It was bc of the layout of the tests. My question is should I take medical terminology this summer even though its not required? I have a friend that still has her book she will let me use can I just read the book? Just wondering what's the best approach.thanks!

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

I don't understand what you are saying. What was it about the test layout that caused you to fail? Were you unable to understand how to enter answers? Was the font unreadable? Most importantly, did you talk to your instructors about this problem? If so, what was their feedback?

If you are trying to improve your chances of success, I suggest that you work on figuring out how to deal with the test layout issue rather than focusing your energy on a course that is not required.

Fireman767

Specializes in Oncology, Critical Care. Has 1 years experience.

Well to answer your question, med terminology helps quite a bit, especially learning new topics. I read the book and understood it, but that's because i read it a few times and had a history in experience in the medical field. For someone with little to no experience and time to burn, its a good idea.

On another note, you may want to review basic English. Your punctuation is lacking and needs work, text speak shouldn't be used (for example "bc"), and your sentences should be in plain English. I don't mean to be rude, but when I have to re-read a sentence to understand whats being asked, its an issue. That won't fly in a nursing program, and the professors would probably not look highly at you or recommend you retake a basic English class.

Medical terminology couldn't hurt, I'd try it out!

If you can't understand how to answer the questions the medical terminology won't help you that much. Nursing has a very specific way they ask questions and eventually you need to learn how to do that. However if it is simply because you did not understand the lingo, then yes, a medical terminology class may help you. Ultimately it's really hard to fail out of nursing school because of not understanding the words-- most programs anticipate you DIDN'T take med term.

RubberDuckieLove

Specializes in Neuro Intensive Care. Has 1 years experience.

Did you fail because of not understanding the medical terminology? If yes, then I would say it would be a good idea to look things over. But, of its the critical thinking format if the questions that caused you to fail, I wouldn't see how learning definitions of words would help.

Well to answer your question, med terminology helps quite a bit, especially learning new topics. I read the book and understood it, but that's because i read it a few times and had a history in experience in the medical field. For someone with little to no experience and time to burn, its a good idea.

On another note, you may want to review basic English. Your punctuation is lacking and needs work, text speak shouldn't be used (for example "bc"), and your sentences should be in plain English. I don't mean to be rude, but when I have to re-read a sentence to understand whats being asked, its an issue. That won't fly in a nursing program, and the professors would probably not look highly at you or recommend you retake a basic English class.

Dude- seriously? Couldn't just answer her question?

Did you fail because of not understanding the medical terminology? If yes' date=' then I would say it would be a good idea to look things over. But, of its the critical thinking format if the questions that caused you to fail, I wouldn't see how learning definitions of words would help.[/quote']

Agreed.

psu_213, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant. Has 6 years experience.

Maybe your school's exams are different than my school's were; however, I must say that there was essentially no medical terminology that was not specifically related to the subject matter at hand. At most, they would use the most very basic, accepted abbreviations (e.g. "mg"). I really cannot see much help from taking this course.

Mewsin

Has 3 years experience.

We don't have a lot of medical terminology in our exams, it is more knowing how to answer critical thinking questions. Perhaps a book about critical thinking would help more? I truly believe once people figure out how to answer the questions, the questions are not that tough.

Well to answer your question, med terminology helps quite a bit, especially learning new topics. I read the book and understood it, but that's because i read it a few times and had a history in experience in the medical field. For someone with little to no experience and time to burn, its a good idea.

On another note, you may want to review basic English. Your punctuation is lacking and needs work, text speak shouldn't be used (for example "bc"), and your sentences should be in plain English. I don't mean to be rude, but when I have to re-read a sentence to understand whats being asked, its an issue. That won't fly in a nursing program, and the professos would probably not look highly at you or recommend you retake a basic English class.

My english is great! I was in a rush and using text code because I was in a hurry. I have seen it used here before, shouldn't be that much of a deal.

Anyways I was just asking since I have time this summer should I read the Medical Terminology book? I didn't fail because of terminology, it was simply because of the way the test were constructed. I have a business degree but we know Nursing tests are very different and that's why I didn't pass the first time.

I have read several books since my year off of school such as "Test Taking Strategies For Nursing Students" as well as others. So im confident I have that figured out. As far as Medical Terminology I was asking did most of you just learn as you go? ( I did in my first semester in regards to the medical terms). What would you suggest? I'm not sure how semesters 2-4 are relating to terminology and if its ok to just learn them as they come up.

Thanks

CT Pixie, BSN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

Many times you can figure out a questions if you understand what the words mean. I am an LPN and started in the RN nursing classes the 2nd year. During my LPN schooling we had a very short Intro to Med Terminology class. The RN program does not. It's a learn as you go. My jaw drops when some of my fellow students don't know what some words are (regularly used, nothing out there) this far into the program (we graduate in a few weeks).

Getting some med term in won't hurt you at all, I would think it could only help. Get the prefixes, suffixes and roots of the words down and you can pretty much figure out any med term word thrown at you.

Many times you can figure out a questions if you understand what the words mean. I am an LPN and started in the RN nursing classes the 2nd year. During my LPN schooling we had a very short Intro to Med Terminology class. The RN program does not. It's a learn as you go. My jaw drops when some of my fellow students don't know what some words are (regularly used, nothing out there) this far into the program (we graduate in a few weeks).

Getting some med term in won't hurt you at all, I would think it could only help. Get the prefixes, suffixes and roots of the words down and you can pretty much figure out any med term word thrown at you.

Ok great thanks! Would you suggest taking the class or just reading the book on my own until school starts in august?

Thanks

CT Pixie, BSN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

If you have money and time to burn, take the class. Otherwise, I think anyone with normal intelligence can get it down without much difficulty or needing a formal class.

As I said, my class in med term was a very brief 'class'. It was pretty much self taught.

Ok great thanks! Would you suggest taking the class or just reading the book on my own until school starts in august?

I hope I don't get slammed for my spelling or writing style. I'm tired and I can't spell so be nice!

I would suggest taking the class. It's not complicated and you can study it on your own but there are a couple things a class gives you

1) hearing the proper way to say things. It sounds simple but hearing the right way to say some things can be immensely helpful. There's nothing worse than feeling embarrassed in front of a group when a doctor or professor corrects your pronunciation, or worse when a patient corrects you. Our pattern of speech is important and part of professionalism.

2) I haven't had any test questions that ask "what does X Y Z mean" but I have had question that have asked what test would u do for XYZ?" Many of the students did not take med term and they had no clue what to answer. I took two semesters for my previous degree (not nursing) and I've never gotten these type of questions wrong. I get at least 1-2 questions that end up being "free points" to me because I understood the terminology.

3) Some of the things you learn in term will help later in clinical. Nursing courses can't possibly teach you everything and when you get on the floor and start doing chart reviews you can figure out whats going on with your patient without looking everything up. You might not know what it means exactly but you can get the big picture.

4) I have struggled with vocab in other classes like micro or chem. You take time away from studying just to learn the jargon. It can be intimidating trying to study new concepts when all the words are foreign. When you know med term it takes some of the OMG-ness of seeing a whole page of new words away and lets you focus on concepts.

3) It can be a good way without the stress to get back into the nursing mindset before your thrown back into the semester.

Best of luck with whatever choice you make.

weemsp

Has 21 years experience.

I must say, I agree 100% with the comment written by 'fireman727'. It is imperative to use proper and complete English grammar.

To be frank, I am SO tired of " text speak" being more common than correct English! Are we really that lazy that we can't write a complete word?... Do we have to use text acronyms in everything we write?

This WILL NOT be acceptable in your course studies, nor will it be allowed in the workplace.

This is a forum to allow us to support and help one another. Sometimes that help is seen by offering hard but honest truths.

Tait, MSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Cardiac, Education, Prof Practice. Has 14 years experience.

I must say, I agree 100% with the comment written by 'fireman727'. It is imperative to use proper and complete English grammar.

To be frank, I am SO tired of " text speak" being more common than correct English! Are we really that lazy that we can't write a complete word?... Do we have to use text acronyms in everything we write?

This WILL NOT be acceptable in your course studies, nor will it be allowed in the workplace.

This is a forum to allow us to support and help one another. Sometimes that help is seen by offering hard but honest truths.

This is a thread on its own and has been clearly addressed by the OP.

In other more relevant news, I think with your schooling background you could pick up a med term book and just self-review. I feel nursing school preps you for any medical terminology you will need within the curriculum. I wouldn't necessarily throw much money towards the cause.