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Married / engaged nurses...

Specializes in Oncology, Apheresis, Clinical Research. Has 8 years experience.

Do you wear your wedding / engagement rings to work? In what setting do you work (hospital, doctor's office, etc)? Newlywed here, just curious!!

I just got married in July, and didn't wear my rings to work on the hospital unit I'd been workng at for 4 years (they all knew I was married, so I didn't care), but I just started a new job at a different hospital, and I almost feel bad not wearing my rings (like I'm betraying my new hubby or something...haha I know that's probably dumb, but I'm just curious how other folks do it). So far, I've been wearing my wedding band and not my engagement ring, and I work on a M/S unit in a hospital.

mrscurtwkids4

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry.

I'm still a nursing student, but I do still wear my wedding rings during my clinicals. I think it depends on how comfortable you are with it. And how large the setting might be on the engagement ring.It might make it more likely to hurt a patient with it. I think the wedding band is fine, but might refrain from wearing the engagement ring just for safety reasons.

Gompers, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU.

I wear my wedding band but not my engagement ring. I work in an ICU where I have to do a 2 minute surgical scrub at the beginning of each shift and the only hand/wrist jewelery we're supposed to be allowed to wear is a plain band.

While I am a bit jealous of my friends' fancy diamond-encrusted wedding bands or combo wedding band/engagement ring settings...I still chose to get the plain band so I wouldn't have to take it off. These bands look nice with either diamond solitaires or three-stone rings like mine. When I was engaged I safety-pinned my diamond ring to my ID badge and scrub top.

It's not worth the risk of infection - both to your patients and to you! Lots of germs can get trapped in ornate rings!

Here's some recent threads on this topic...

https://allnurses.com/forums/f8/wedding-rings-work-158276.html?highlight=wedding+ring

https://allnurses.com/forums/f98/silly-question-wedding-rings-155093.html?highlight=wedding+ring

https://allnurses.com/forums/f8/wedding-rings-sit-high-up-vs-gloves-113720.html?highlight=wedding+ring

Nurset1981

Specializes in community health, LTC, SNF, Tele-Health. Has 7 years experience.

I just recently became engaged about 6 months ago. I wear my engagement ring and another silver band on my right hand. I feel funny without them. I tried not wearing it and I'd notice that my ring was gone and my heart would leap into my throat thinking I'd lost it! I had enough of heart palps and decided to wear it. =)

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

i wear my wedding ring. it's fairly plain with one stone in a channel setting. no rough or sharp edges to hurt anyone. my husband designed it for me so it wouldn't be a problem to wear with gloves. our rings were blessed by the priest, and i never take mine off.

gentle

Specializes in Med-Surg, Tele, DOU.

Plain comfort band to protect both myself and my patients.

Marie_LPN, RN, LPN, RN

Specializes in 5 yrs OR, ASU Pre-Op 2 yr. ER.

I wear a plain comfort band, and not the original band either. I put it on a safety pin, and pin it on the left side of my scrub shirt, i put the pin through the brastrap as well, so i can't get the shirt off w/o taking the pin off, and therefore, making sure i have the ring.

RGN1

Specializes in med/surg.

We are allowed to wear plain wedding bands but not any other rings. It's right because of infection control.

If I've been off & got to work before remembering to take my engagement ring off I have a small & very deep top pocket in my uniform where I can safely put it until the end of my shift.

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 43 years experience.

After the day shift laundry staff called to tell me they found my engagement ring in the washer, (long night shift...never even missed it), stayed at home. Wisely chose wider plain wedding band that still have 31yrs later.

Depends on what your facility dress code has in place.

Where I work, we are advised to wear flat band. High settings can tear glove, or tear a person's skin.

It is infection control who has this in place.

Good idea in my opinion.

am17sg05

Specializes in psych,emergency,telemetry,home health.

when i first came here in the us,i was not wearing my wedding band at work.they were asking me if i am really married.so a wedding ring or band is an indication in the hospital where i used to work if you are available or not.since then on,i wore my wedding band.

suzy253, RN

Specializes in Telemetry/Med Surg.

I don't wear my wedding band to work.

nursedawn67, LPN

Specializes in Geriatrics, LTC.

I wear my wedding band and my engagement ring...as far as losing any of my stones from it, it is under my house insurande. As far as work goes I am always careful to be sure it isn't in the position to "catch" any ones skin and I am always sure to wash it good with the antbact soap and /or alcohol gel, and havn't had a problem getting gloves on, other then really small ones, so I carry the appropriate size for me with me.

muffie, RN

Specializes in cardiac med-surg. Has 25 years experience.

yes i do and i take them off as necessary

I think it's always better to wear your weddign ring / engagement ring to your badge with safety pin ........the only concern is you want the wedding band to be with you.....you cannot take a chance to hurt your patient and can't experiment till you hurt him.Reality is most important than sentiment.........what say????:yeah:

When I work in L&D, I wear my engagment/wedding ring - they are soldered together and I almost regret that decision now. When I work in NICU, I can't wear rings there d/t infection control. Although it's a little high and a princess cut, I haven't had any problems with gloves tearing it.

If they ever allow rings in NICU, I have found a plain band that matches my ring, and it doesn't cost that much. Of course, the jeweler added that it's really popular with nurses. Could she have gotten that because she saw that I was reading "Nursing Against the Odds" when waiting for my ring to be fixed? :idea:

NeoNurseTX, RN

Specializes in NICU Level III.

I see nurses wearing huge stones at all the hospitals I've done clinicals at. When I was engaged, I left the ring at home because, just, EW.

I see nurses wearing huge stones at all the hospitals I've done clinicals at. When I was engaged, I left the ring at home because, just, EW.

I've seen that as well. I think it's unprofessional.

Flame away.

augigi, CNS

Specializes in Critical Care, Cardiothoracics, VADs. Has 10 years experience.

I see lots of people wearing their engagement rings on a necklace so they have it with them, but not getting ickies on it.

RNLifesaver

Specializes in Birthing Center, Gerontology, LTC, Psych. Has 12 years experience.

I wear an engagment ring. HOWEVER- I do not do patient care at the moment. I currently work in administration. I also wore it when I worked as a Supervisor in Long term care. Again, I had minimal if any patient contact. My job consisted primarily of paperwork, delegating, and troubleshooting-- (IV pumps, etc....)

If I am ever in a position that involves more direct patient care, I think that it is a better habit to get in to just to remove them for work. It's basic nursing.

Fomite-n.

An inanimate object or substance that is capable of transmitting infectious organisms from one individual to another.Now, I realize that you will undoubtedly see many nurses with rings on. That does not make it right. You will also see nurses with FAKE NAILS painted! Is it a big deal? Maybe not. But with the incidence of nosocomial infections, why take a chance?

On another note- we should always strive to look as professional as we can. Nurses always fight for our "professionalism" and the fact that we as nurses are "professional". Well, we need to LOOK professional too.

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