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Magnet status

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by dec2007 dec2007 (Member)

Oh'Ello, BSN, RN

Specializes in Heme Onc.

OP, I think its important to temper your expectations about how this impacts patient care. If you look at the requirements and expectations for Magnet Status, you'll realize they have little to do with patient care and outcomes. It's essentially a (convoluted) structuring of nursing impacts in a particular facility.

Most of the requirements have to do with staff's level of education and little else.

Organization Eligibility Requirements

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 24 years experience.

The concept is good. However, the actual result is not what is intended, but an entirely different animal. Like most such initiatives, it falls short of really realizing the goals intended.

The magnet facilities around here have all the same problems the NON-Magnet facilities do. And a HECKUVA a LOT of money went into it. Money that could be far more wisely spent, IMO.

Good points. As a nurse, your core job is completely unchanged. However, you may be asked to participate in many ancillary activities which might amount to nothing more than a song and dance prior to recertification.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Good points. As a nurse, your core job is completely unchanged. However, you may be asked to participate in many ancillary activities which might amount to nothing more than a song and dance prior to recertification.

And most of those ancillary activities in which you are asked/forced to participate are unpaid.

It's easier to sell the Kool Aid to younger nurses who haven't been through it before. I've been in Magnet Hospitals and in non-Magnet hospitals. The Magnet facilities actively court the nursing staff in the months leading up to the certification visit, but it's back to business as usual the moment the surveyors leave the building. I see it all as a huge farce after being through it countless times.

What seems to make the biggest difference to the life of the bedside nurse is not Magnet status but union status.

LobotRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med Tele, Gen Surgical. Has 4 years experience.

And most of those ancillary activities in which you are asked/forced to participate are unpaid.....

....What seems to make the biggest difference to the life of the bedside nurse is not Magnet status but union status.

^^^Exaaaaactly Ruby! Incidentally, we are paid for time in those ancillary meetings. However! Being forced into it and the impact it has on work life balance is horrible.

Be on Shared Governance, sure it's only 2 hours for the monthly meeting. If you get assigned a task? Watch out. Pretty soon you are working for free on some project that is more likely than not to just be a song-n-dance routine. And since we cannot work from home, it means I have to come into the hospital if I want to be paid for the task time. Not. Worth. It. Ever.:nono:

It is smoke and mirrors, gives the illusion that nurses are somehow "in charge" when in actuality, you are doing the job of your managers for less pay and time away from one's personal life....for the powers that be to either take all the credit, (

In my experience, it is "governing yourselves" with the approval of the managers.

Such a marketing scheme. I have yet in my many years ever have a patient say "hold up a moment, I want to be treated in the Magnet hospital!!"

mtjoanna

Specializes in psych and geriatric. Has 5 years experience.

What seems to make the biggest difference to the life of the bedside nurse is not Magnet status but union status.

Agreed! I enjoyed working at the hospital prior to Magnet; the union helped keep the hospital honest but Magnet made it much less pleasant.

Kialya, ASN

Specializes in Detox and Psyc nursing. Has 7 years experience.

Let me start off by saying I do NOT work in a magnet hospital (I have friends that do). From what I am told, the hospitals know exactly when the surveyors are going to show up, they beef up the staff and supplies a week or two before inspection so they look well staffed with happy people then the day after the survey it is back to bare bones staffing etc. Yuck.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

Let me start off by saying I do NOT work in a magnet hospital (I have friends that do). From what I am told, the hospitals know exactly when the surveyors are going to show up, they beef up the staff and supplies a week or two before inspection so they look well staffed with happy people then the day after the survey it is back to bare bones staffing etc. Yuck.

Magnet is not like a JCAHO survey. The site visit is merely one tiny part of what is involved with becoming Magnet certified. The bigger part is the application itself.

BittyBabyGrower, MSN, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, educator.

We have been awarded Magnet 3 times, is my facility better...maybe the first time because we had a fabulous Nursing Director that really worked for us. Now, nope, it is back to all the bad habits the facility had before.

My biggest peeve is that they bounced many people off committees due to the fact they did NOT have their BSN. These people have been on these committees since they started and were the go to people, knew their stuff and had been involved when we started Shared Goverance. And when the new people were in place and projects completed, these people who lead these projects to start with and had worked on them for years were excluded in being recognized for their efforts. Totally rubbed me the wrong way. I had worked with several of them and why should my name be the only one on their because Inhave extra letters behind it???

They make darn sure everything looks good on paper and they handpick the ones for the committees Magnet is looking at. And quite frankly, when patients are looking at hospitals, they 1. Usually don't have a choice on where they go and 2. Have no idea what Magnet is or means.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Let me start off by saying I do NOT work in a magnet hospital (I have friends that do). From what I am told, the hospitals know exactly when the surveyors are going to show up, they beef up the staff and supplies a week or two before inspection so they look well staffed with happy people then the day after the survey it is back to bare bones staffing etc. Yuck.

Yup. That's pretty much how it is.

beckster_01, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU. Has 12 years experience.

We are a "magnet hospital," but all of the hospitals in the area are except for the very small ones, so I have little to compare it to. As far as shared governance goes, it can help improve things. For example I work in a large institution that likes to push for change, some of which is good and some is not so practical. Two recent examples on my unit: the early mobility/sedation reduction program and the recent nurse led rounds experiment. The unit council played a HUGE role in making sure these changes were practical from a bedside standpoint, and not just administration putting their nose where it doesn't belong. The mobility/sedation plan worked GREAT and reduced our re-admission rate and overall patient outcomes. They are still working on the nurse led rounds, but at least the bedside nurses know they have a voice and it is being heard. FYI we are not a unionized hospital either, so it is the best we've got ;)

WKShadowNP, DNP, APRN

Specializes in Hospital medicine; NP precepting; staff education. Has 20 years experience.

I've done shared governance for four years and most of the time the projects implemented stayed that way and one was even adopted hospital wide. We aren't magnet but we are Pathway Center of Excellence. My hospital does support us going back to school even offering education assistance and/or discounts with education partners. (I'm getting a 20% reduction in my tuition toward my NP.)

They aren't laying off those without higher education but they did make it where if you want to transfer, you have to agree to get the BSN by three years. It's unfortunate because some ADNs/Diploma nurses (yes we still have some) have BAs or BSs from other fields. You would think the education would apply.

My hospital just got awarded is 4th magnet designation. We are am award winning hospital for patient and staff satisfaction. Named best place to work year after year.

There is always a bad apple in a group, but one cannot generalize based off that.

Magnet is reflective of nursing excellence and shard governance.

SC_RNDude

Has 7 years experience.

But, you don't have to be Magnet to have shared governance and all the other things to achieve great employee and patient satisfaction.

I work at a Magnet hospital, and it is a great place to work. I don't see why we need the actual Magnet designation to have what we have. To me, it is a marketing ploy.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

But, you don't have to be Magnet to have shared governance and all the other things to achieve great employee and patient satisfaction.

I work at a Magnet hospital, and it is a great place to work. I don't see why we need the actual Magnet designation to have what we have. To me, it is a marketing ploy.

That is my biggest difficulty with fully embracing the concept. All these things could be done without needing Magnet.

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience.

Magnet can be an incentive that drives positive change for nurses, and it can also be nothing more than $2,125,000 logo for the hospital's website that does nothing to improve a nurse's practice environment. Unfortunately more often than not it seems to be the latter. I think this is partly due to a misunderstanding of what Magnet is; it's not an award for nurses, it's an award for hospital and nursing leadership that provides the environment, support, staffing, decisional role, etc to provide excellent patient care. Staff nurses are supposed to use it as leverage to improve these factors and make their leadership earn the award rather than helping them get the award without earning, which is unfortunately what happens sometimes.

The hospital I worked at before I left had Magnet status. I have my ADN and the pressure was on to further my education - this was one of the reasons I left. I finished nursing school in my 40's, needed a job to make ends meet. I have/had no desire to move up the corporate ladder or to get an advanced degree - I just wanted to work & make money. Felt I couldn't do that at the hospital I was at.