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IV Help

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i know this may sound really stupid but i was wondering when do you use the ml/hr or cc/hr and when do you calculate the drop factor i know how to do it but when it is phrased in an actual hypothetical math question i go blank.

also were any of you really nervous when you did your first iv i almost just want to do one so i can get over the initial apprehension.

Thanks

hi, i know how you feel about 'the first iv.' honestly, i didnt get my first iv in until after i was out of nursing school. it just takes A LOT of practice. im not the best now, and still sometimes call for help. but good luck in school and w/your iv skills!! ~ Amanda

when do you use the ml/hr or cc/hr and when do you calculate the drop factor

Ml and cc are interchangeable. They are practically the same. It depends on the pharm or pixus of that facility which one will be on the mars. ml's are typically displayed on the pumps.

Drip/drop factor is used when you do not have access to a pump which only occurs in very rural settings. In fact most of our instructors have never had to use this in the real world.

I was very nervous when I started my first IV. We practiced on each other in the skills labs and that was nerve wraking but it was also the same way on my first pt but luckily the good ol stress mechanism kicks in gives you a bunch of epi and you feel the rush and do your best. Just hope that your first is someone with good veins. Love when they say ohhh they have a hard time starting an iv on me

Good luck

RedSox33RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept, M/S.

I'm peeved that our nursing school does not teach us to start IV's. They said most hospitals in our area have their own IV teaching program for new grads, but we were free to take a course on our own. I decided that I'm going to take the Red Cross IV course this summer when I renew my CPR license. There will be so much to still learn as a new grad nurse (even though that's many, MANY moons away for me!), that I don't want to be throwing IV training into that also.

I'm peeved that our nursing school does not teach us to start IV's. They said most hospitals in our area have their own IV teaching program for new grads, but we were free to take a course on our own. I decided that I'm going to take the Red Cross IV course this summer when I renew my CPR license. There will be so much to still learn as a new grad nurse (even though that's many, MANY moons away for me!), that I don't want to be throwing IV training into that also.

You have a good point. It is a real catch-22. The school thinks you will/should be taught this on the job while the hospital thinks you should have learned this in school (what are clinicals for then?). I feel for you. As a student I think I started(attempted) maybe 2 Iv's. Why not take a course on your own? Show's initiative!

i know this may sound really stupid but i was wondering when do you use the ml/hr or cc/hr and when do you calculate the drop factor i know how to do it but when it is phrased in an actual hypothetical math question i go blank.

also were any of you really nervous when you did your first iv i almost just want to do one so i can get over the initial apprehension.

Thanks

I'm assuming you know the number of ml/hr, right?

Take it step by step.

If you know the # of ml/hr, and you know how many drops there are in a ml, then you know how many drops there are in an hour.

(e.g., 200 ml/hr with 10 drops/ml is 2000 drops/hr.)

Then, since you know how many drops there are in an hour, divide by the number of minutes in an hour and you then have the number of drops/min.

(By the way, it is better to start by increasing the size of numbers than by decreasing the size of numbers; that is, first figure out that you have 2000 drops/hr, rather than 200/60 ml/min. Most of the time it won't matter; but in some cases it will. Your accuracy is improved (and especially if you are using an electronic device to help you figure) if you first multiply then divide, instead of dividing and then multiplying. This is a concept that is well-known among experienced computer programmers.)

NurseFirst

meownsmile, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho.

Nursing schools dont teach iv instertion BECAUSE they have a class,, you buy it you learn it. Its a money thing. Yes you can learn to do it at your employment so dont pay to take the class unless you HAVE to.

IV insertion is a skill that is learned and will depend on how well you like to do it as to how skilled you become at it. Kind of like skiing, the more you do it the better you get at it.

angel Ann

Specializes in ICU,acute respiratory care.. Has 10 years experience.

i know this may sound really stupid but i was wondering when do you use the ml/hr or cc/hr and when do you calculate the drop factor i know how to do it but when it is phrased in an actual hypothetical math question i go blank.

also were any of you really nervous when you did your first iv i almost just want to do one so i can get over the initial apprehension.

Thanks

Hi there!.As long as you have your IV calculation formula on hand and know how to compute properly, there's no need to worry about.If you're not confident yet, I suggest that you bring some examples or pre calculated standard rate of infusion with you.This is how I do it:

Example:

macrodrip drop factor = 15 (usually for regular adult IV giving set)

microdrip drop factor = 60 ( usually for pediatric )

1.let say you are using the macrodrop formula

Volume to be infused

--------------------

hours of infusion X 15/60

the doctors order is 1 liter IVF for 8 hours

Ex: 1000 ml or cc

------------- = 125 ml or cc/hr (this is the rate you will set in IV pump)

8 hours

then if you want to know how many drops/min:

125 x 15/60 = 31.25 drops per minute or (31)

same computation with microdrop.Hope this helps:)

General E. Speaking, RN, RN

Specializes in floor to ICU.

i know this may sound really stupid but i was wondering when do you use the ml/hr or cc/hr and when do you calculate the drop factor i know how to do it but when it is phrased in an actual hypothetical math question i go blank.

also were any of you really nervous when you did your first iv i almost just want to do one so i can get over the initial apprehension.

Thanks

when i was in lvn school 15+ years ago, we were only able to get 18 gauge needles- and we practiced on EACH OTHER...ouch :crying2:

Antikigirl, ASN, RN

Specializes in Education, Acute, Med/Surg, Tele, etc. Has 13 years experience.

My school did not teach IV insertion, only drop rates and flushing. We were told the insurance at school didn't cover mistakes made by IV's so we had to learn as we went!

Lets just say I learned IV's in a very nontraditional way...(a funny story about 6 nursing students, new years morning, hang overs, IV hydration taught via medical friends of mine, and lots of laughs and 'oh my gawd I don't believe we did that!!"...). I don't suggest the untraditional way of course, but us gals are some of the best IV starts in the county now! LOL!!!!!

Suggestion if you can get this...learn IV starts from Respiratory therapists or paramedics! I learned from them and it was great and I felt comfortable the whole time!

They really taught me NOT to look for a vein, but to FEEL it...those ones you see on the surface are made to move easily because they are superficial and need to move easily for temprature changes, pressures, or being hit...so don't look at those guys and think "oh wow I see that one so clearly...easy poke!"...you will be fishing if not loose it almost everytime! FEEL for them...it is the deeper ones that don't move as quickly...and don't hit an artery or tendon!

(I use to feel for my own while in the bathtub so I knew tendon from artery from vein...veins when you tap lightly feel very soft and bouncy...now I can do it no probelm...)

Hairstylingnurse

Specializes in Med-surg > LTC > HH >.

Nursing schools dont teach iv instertion BECAUSE they have a class,, you buy it you learn it. Its a money thing. Yes you can learn to do it at your employment so dont pay to take the class unless you HAVE to.

IV insertion is a skill that is learned and will depend on how well you like to do it as to how skilled you become at it. Kind of like skiing, the more you do it the better you get at it.

Hi, I just wanted to let you guy's know that we did get IV certified in LPN school ( in tennessee ). It was a standard part of our curriculum. We as usual practiced on one another. But most places are happy to train you at thier cost, well at least where I have worked. There is a great thread somewhere on here with some awesome iv tips. I don't know the exact name but it is well worth finding. good luck:p

I was taught how to insert IV's in school we just didn't practice on each other. It was learning from a book and then practicing on the "dummies" in the skills lab. We learned how to flush, how to set up tubing and spike a bag, all that stuff. We started IV's in clinical.

steph

Hairstylingnurse

Specializes in Med-surg > LTC > HH >.

Yeah we used the dummies and the dummie arm that actually had a real flash(the blood return) we used red kool aid.Then when we were comfortable with the dummie we did it on each other:chair: . Boy I hated that, I had a very obese student to attempt it on and it didn't happen. Even my instructor didn't get it because the student was really fussing. The dummie arm ofcourse had nice firm veins that syuck up beautifully. Too bad most pts. aren't that good:roll .

I appreciate this refresher of iv calculation thanks Angel

Hi there!.As long as you have your IV calculation formula on hand and know how to compute properly, there's no need to worry about.If you're not confident yet, I suggest that you bring some examples or pre calculated standard rate of infusion with you.This is how I do it:

Example:

macrodrip drop factor = 15 (usually for regular adult IV giving set)

microdrip drop factor = 60 ( usually for pediatric )

1.let say you are using the macrodrop formula

Volume to be infused

--------------------

hours of infusion X 15/60

the doctors order is 1 liter IVF for 8 hours

Ex: 1000 ml or cc

------------- = 125 ml or cc/hr (this is the rate you will set in IV pump)

8 hours

then if you want to know how many drops/min:

125 x 15/60 = 31.25 drops per minute or (31)

same computation with microdrop.Hope this helps:)

lil' girl, LPN

Specializes in LTC. Has 4 years experience.

Aren't you just asking when ml's and when gtt(drops). mL's are in an IV pump and drops per minute would be gravity (no Pump)

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