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It's a Myth that it takes thousands of dollars to train a new Grad RN

First Year   (16,137 Views | 66 Replies)

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You are reading page 6 of It's a Myth that it takes thousands of dollars to train a new Grad RN. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

CrunchRN has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Clinical Research, Outpt Women's Health.

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Why does it even matter?

Thank you. That was my question pages ago.

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BrandonLPN has 5 years experience as a LPN.

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I'm going to echo the "so what?" sentiment. Yes, orienting a new nurse is an expensive investment. Not something everyone doesn't already know. I remain flabbergasted any employee thinks they have to "pay back" their employer for the cost of orientation.

If I find a better job offer that works better for my life, I'm giving two weeks weather I've been off orientation for two days or two years. We have to do what's best for our pocketbooks. Employers lay off employees at the drop of a hat if money's tight. Remember, theyd fire us all and replace us with minimum wage techs in a heartbeat if they thought they could get away with it. To THESE people

we are obliged to pay anything back??? I think not.

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dudette10 has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Academics.

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Because 20% of the 42 new graduates in the Lindy and Reiter study were not retained, the estimated cost to orient each of these 42 new graduates was between $39,000 and $65,000." (The article breaks down specifically how these figures were calculated)

The full reference annotation was this:

reported that the cost to orient 42 new graduates to a hospital was $611,455, or $14,558 each. However, this cost did not include expenses related to turnover. Beecroft et al14 reported that the cost of replacing an RN is between 75% and 125% of the RN's annual salary because of costs related to recruitment, overtime compensation to ensure coverage, orientation of replacement employees, lost productivity, and customer satisfaction. Because 20% of the 42 new graduates in the Lindy and Reiter study were not retained, the estimated cost to orient each of these 42 new graduates was between $39,000 and $65,000.

Now, the huge figures for orienting a new grad actually make sense. It's not the cost of orientation. It's the cost of turnover of new grads that is costing money.

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It's great that the OP is so enthusiastic about using his "critical thinking" skills, but a big piece of critical thinking is at least glancing casually at the literature and info that is already available, and not just looking around your own little plot of earth and seeing what seems to make sense to you based on your personal observations. A formal "orientation" of 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, whatever, is not the total of a new employee orientation. Typically, one isn't formally off orientation until the 6-month mark, and there are costs involved in that ongoing process. Also, however much new grads would like to think differently, they are not as productive as an experienced RN, and remain a financial cost rather than benefit to the emloyer, for quite some time. Are all the figures quoted in the literature just made up? For what purpose?

"Because 20% of the 42 new graduates in the Lindy and Reiter study were not retained, the estimated cost to orient each of these 42 new graduates was between $39,000 and $65,000." (The article breaks down specifically how these figures were calculated)

Nursing Center - Journal Article

 

 

"Recent studies of the costs of nurse turnover have reported results ranging from about $22,000 to over $64,000 (U.S.) per nurse turnover (Advisory Board, 1999; Jones, 2005; OBrien-Pallas et al., 2006; Stone et al., 2003; Waldman et al., 2004)." (This refers to general nursing staff turnover, not new graduates specifically.)The Costs and Benefits of Nurse Turnover: A Business Case for Nurse Retention

 

Cost of Hiring New Nurses on ADVANCE for Nurses (This article includes the chart referenced earlier in the thread, breaking down the specific costs involved in getting a new graduate RN from the hiring process to "competency" and showing those costs add up to nearly $100k at one NY hospital)

 

"The hospital did a study 3 or 4 years ago and came up with $35K-$38K to orient a new grad nurse. That figure has probably changed or gone up since then. She has seen figures of $50K-$90K for all bed size hospitals in orienting these nurses." (Please note this data is from 2008)

LISTSERV 15.5 - MEDLIB-L Archives

"Cost of Hiring New Nurses on ADVANCE for Nurses (This article includes the chart referenced earlier in the thread, breaking down the specific costs involved in getting a new graduate RN from the hiring process to "competency" and showing those costs add up to nearly $100k at one NY hospital)"

From the same article you failed to mention that "The approximate starting salary for a graduate nurse in the New York City and Long Island is between $65,000 and $75,000 annually."

In the middle part of the country, you won't find these kinds of salaries for graduate nurses!!!! Just 2 weeks ago, my friend had offers from a hospital in both Arkansas and Alabama that started her at $19.00/hour + shift differential. At $19.00/hour, it is mathematically impossible for someone to earn between $65,000 and $75,000 for working full time only!!!!!!!

 

"The hospital did a study 3 or 4 years ago and came up with $35K-$38K to orient a new grad nurse. That figure has probably changed or gone up since then. She has seen figures of $50K-$90K for all bed size hospitals in orienting these nurses." (Please note this data is from 2008)

In the beginning of article it clearly states that "A plethora of orientation programs has been developed to meet the needs of novice nurses. These multifaceted residency, internship, or preceptorship programs last from 4 to 12 months and are designed to provide new graduates with supervised hands-on clinical experience."

Again it's like I keep beating a dead horse. 4 MONTHS=Approx 16 weeks and 12 months=52 weeks. Training now a days for med-surge doesn't last 4-12 months. Mine lasted only 6 WEEKS.

All the research you quoted is misleading due to the fact that you are comparing training that last from 16-52 weeks, to my training that has lasted only 6 WEEKS

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NickiLaughs has 11 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency, Trauma, Critical Care.

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From what I can tell, you want us to base all concrete evidence only on your particular situation?

I don't think anyone cares that much....especially with how you have portrayed yourself and responded to others. There's a difference between being classy and knowledgeable and being argumentative and condescending.

Edited by NickiLaughs
typo

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sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

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