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Is it wrong to leave a job during orientation?

Nurses   (6,518 Views | 38 Replies)

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56 minutes ago, Gennaver said:

I'm in a similar situation myself now. I got hired by two places, both PRN

One is a LTC facility with 8 hour day shift, PRN part time. This works because I can fit it in nicely with the other job that is full time 12 hour dayshifts in a hospital.

However the LTC is now discussing going to 12 hour shifts and in order to keep both I'd end up working five 12 hour shifts a week.

I'm in orientation and on boarding at both but, my decision will have to come very soon because things have changed with the hours at the LTC. Likely that will be the one I let go because they are "changing" on me.

Jen

You will probably end up working way over shift if the place is chaotic.

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On 6/15/2019 at 2:33 PM, Pinson said:

Some people are known to use orientation as easy money and have planned to leave during or after it is complete. To alleviate this problem, we had to start paying for the orientation after 90 days of employment. Also, we started paying a little extra to staff who assist in the floor training process so they don't feel like all that work was for nothing. 

Illegal. What state are you in and why hasn't anyone reported your company? People don't stay because who works 3 months for free?

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Here.I.Stand has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro.

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13 hours ago, Pinson said:

This was the initial one week orientation prior to working on the floor. In addition, they signed an agreement form prior to starting orientation. So yes, completely legal. 

That doesn’t make it legal... an employment “contract” doesn’t supersede federal labor law

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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3 hours ago, Gennaver said:

I'm in a similar situation myself now. I got hired by two places, both PRN

One is a LTC facility with 8 hour day shift, PRN part time. This works because I can fit it in nicely with the other job that is full time 12 hour dayshifts in a hospital.

However the LTC is now discussing going to 12 hour shifts and in order to keep both I'd end up working five 12 hour shifts a week.

I'm in orientation and on boarding at both but, my decision will have to come very soon because things have changed with the hours at the LTC. Likely that will be the one I let go because they are "changing" on me.

Jen

When you sign on with certain scheduling agreements and those get changed on you midstream, I think all bets are off.  You signed up for eights, they sprung twelves, bye-bye.

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14 hours ago, Pinson said:

This was the initial one week orientation prior to working on the floor. In addition, they signed an agreement form prior to starting orientation. So yes, completely legal. 

Ah. So they get a crappy orientation, and they get paid q2wk like everyone else.

 

16 hours ago, adventure_rn said:

I completely understand making new hires sign a contract saying that they'll owe the hospital money if they leave before a certain date

I don't. I suppose if the other party were also negotiating something it would make more sense. As it stands right now, these are nothing more than agreements on the part of new hires to stay somewhere for X time regardless of employer shenanigans, under the guise of payback for training which may or may not be the kind of training anyone in their right mind would ever agree to pay for.

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Gennaver has 13 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Ortho, Med surg and L&D.

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On 6/17/2019 at 8:55 AM, TriciaJ said:

When you sign on with certain scheduling agreements and those get changed on you midstream, I think all bets are off.  You signed up for eights, they sprung twelves, bye-bye.

I agree, I feel like they are chasing to find solutions to loosing PM shift nurses. The job I applied for was a weekender double shift but, the manager said it was off the table for me due to my being in the Reserves, (granted, not right but understandable and not a concern.) Then she asked me to work the 2-10 and even though I agreed it took a couple days before I called her back and told her I would not be happy with that position and I really wanted the shift I applied for. 

They called back and offered me a PRN 8 hour dayshift position and it works great with my other job. I applied for both jobs thinking they'd work well with each other but, I can see that even the flip flop is not going to work.

I should just now be off of orientation and they are about to put me onto the schedule. However, I know what my next, and last, conversation with the manager will be.

Jen

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L-ICURN has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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On 6/15/2019 at 10:29 AM, catladyx8 said:

While in orientation, if you know that it is not the place for you, by all means, leave.  If you see that the facility or policies are not something you can work with, then there is no sense wasting your time, staff time, and facility time going through orientation and dreading every day.  I've done it myself and I have no regrets or heartburn for having done it.

I've done it. I know when something is simply not going to work. It's the orientation period. It's the 90 day trial period to see if you'll make it or if your employer thinks you're a good fit. Better to be honest with oneself and leave before you take up more time, money, and resources.

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Gennaver has 13 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Ortho, Med surg and L&D.

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This morning I finalized my decision in my own recent orientation situation.

I had 4 shifts orientation, (maybe it was 5 but it ended over 2 weeks ago, these were 8 hour shifts.) I had 2 shifts on one unit and 2 on the other.

They were waiting for me to get my full time job schedule and me to call them back with my availability. I'd planned to call them any day to tell them I wouldn't proceed past orientation. "Trust our gut" right?

The day before yesterday the assistant DON called me from vacation to ask if I was going to stay and if I did they would agree to give me the part time position I agreed to before orientation and to not offer my last minute shifts.

However, the very next day they were very short and needed someone. I agreed, and agreed to work yesterday, (my first day off of orientation.) One nurse was on a scheduled time off, her vacation and the unit secretary wasn't there that day.

At shift change the evening nurse was 'hot' about something not getting done, (understandably and she and I both spoke strongly but, moved past it.) I told her it was my first day off of orientation and I was doing the best I could.

Within moment, the DON showed up and asked me to make sure I did 'this' before I left, (it was a phone call regarding an admission from the night before by the same afternoon nurse.) The DON pointed out the phone number I needed to call and stood over my shoulder offering no help as I asked her, "what do I need to do or say exactly?" It was a call to out of state family about a dementia patient on admission paperwork that was something I'd never done before.

Anyway, when I left I felt bad about the patients that heard the loud conversations and after a great day taking care of patients I felt like the DON was more of a toxic micromanager than a team leader, (I mean really, what the hay was stopping her from making the call while the newly off of orientation nurse was finishing her charting?) Still, while it was nice to get a days pay, my gut was right. I worked one day, as a last minute fill in, off of orientation and I will not work another for that facility.

Jen

p.s. yes, I think our gut and spider sense is right, if it doesn't feel right in orientation, take it as a good indicator and move on.

p.p.s. edit to add: I am very lucky I got hired by another place at the same time and it is a huge difference in culture. It really makes it easier but, I do agree to trust your gut and save your sense of wellness

Edited by Gennaver
p.s. and omitted word

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ABfina88 has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiothoracic ICU.

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The biggest mistake is often staying too long as to not disappoint the unit or management not firing soon enough. If someone is not a fit, they aren't a fit. Leaving during orientation is the best thing for everyone. 

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How do you place this scenario on your resume and application? 

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On 6/16/2019 at 10:37 PM, Leader25 said:

Best time to leave.

How do you handle this on your resume and job application though? I had this scenario twice in the last 3 yrs while getting through BSN. Once 3 yrs ago and once recently. I gave notice within a month during orientation. The positions were a bad fit practice wise and for school. No other better offers were coming my way although I had applied for others before accepting my only offer. I feel like my resume is becoming a mess. Do you have to list every job you ever held?

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Ashley9247 has 6 years experience as a ADN and specializes in Certified Nurse Midwife.

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I started a "prn procedure nurse" position that they actually expected me to work full time in the clinic setting. I turned my notice in after a month. I didn't see the point in wasting my time or theirs when it was clear that our expectations weren't the same. The only part I regret is not asking to transfer to a different unit within the facility but what's done is done. I have a different position now that seems to be perfect. 

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