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Is it worth it?

Posted

Has 22 years experience.

I am putting this question out there for all you NPs that have made it through and are practicing now. I am 43 yo and have been a nurse for 22 years. I have done all kinds of nursing and currently work for an insurance company ft and eow doing private duty. I recently applied to grad school to the adult NP program but I dont know if my heart is in it. I know its going to be a big time commitment and will probably take over my life for the next few years. In the end I will probably not make much more than I do now. I think i would be happier with my job as an Np since my current one leaves me quite bored and unfulfilled...but by the time i graduate i am going to be pushing 50! . My question is...Is it worth it to go back to school at my age and will I be the oldest geezer in my class?

In my opinion, it is never too late! Just remember that your job isn't all about the money; do you enjoy it?...Does it bring meaning/purpose to your life? How would you feel if your 50th birthday came and went and you were still in the same job as you are now? If you think you would be happier and feel more fulfilled as a NP then go for it! :)

lhflanurseNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Nurse Practitioner. Has 40 years experience.

I am just starting in my practice and love every minute. As to your age...I was several years older than you will be when you graduate when I started! As Maryam'sMom pointed out, if you strongly feel you want to do this...do it. The time only gets further and further along and you will wake up and wonder "what if".

I am young but I believe in going back to school. I would tell you to go for it…If you think about it…the economy is tough….and if you want a solid retirement you may have to work until 65-70 as many people are. So why not sacrifice maybe 2-3 years to have 10-15 years worth of valuable, rewarding, fulfilling work! Plus you will be making probably a lot more :) I would go for it…and by the way you are not a "old geezer" in my FNP orientation the average age was around 35…with quite a few older people! In my ADN class back in the day, I had a older person I Think she was in her 50-60's with a PHD going back to school for nursing…..She actually taught one of our lectures :)

It is possible and never doubt yourself…with your age you bring wisdom and experience. That is priceless in itself.

BCgradnurse, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in allergy and asthma, urgent care. Has 12 years experience.

I got my RN at 44 and my NP at 47. I was the oldest geezer in my cohort but I was also one of the best students. I have no regrets going back to school. I've been practicing as an NP for 6 years now and couldn't be happier. I work in a private practice and love the regular hours. It's not physically taxing and is really low stress. I'm really happy I did it. Age doesn't matter.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

It's worth it if you have a desire for the role. Otherwise, maybe not.

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MikeFNPC, MSN

Specializes in FNP.

Got my RN at 25, BSN at 45, FNP at 47. I've been practicing for 3 months and LOVE it. My job is much less physically demanding than my RN job was. The pay is about 20% more but no long hours, call, or weekends. Most of all, and I can't stress this enough, the challenge of diagnosing, prescribing, and interpreting diagnostic tests makes my day every day.

Nursing, for me, had become a little monotonous. And admittedly, going from expert to novice was the biggest challenge for me. Working as an FNP gives me a higher sense of fulfillment. My best advice for you would be to make a decision then follow it through to the end regardless of the waxing and waning feelings you'll have; because you'll have them. One things for sure, the future for NP's is bright.

Mike

BirkieGirl

Has 25 years experience.

age brings BOTH experience and wisdom. i was an RN for 18 yrs before i was confident enough to go back. there are MANY non-traditional type students in our class and many in their 40s and 50s. it's NEVER too late! financially, aim to find a good position with some loan forgiveness if they are in your area.. i know for many, the loan issue is the deciding factor. good luck!

Im debating the same issue. Everyone says this degree doesn't offer much more pay than an RN, but I don't want to be doing RN work when I'm in my 60s....and I'm assuming I will still have to work at that age

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

Im debating the same issue. Everyone says this degree doesn't offer much more pay than an RN, but I don't want to be doing RN work when I'm in my 60s....and I'm assuming I will still have to work at that age

It's not about the money. But there are few bedside RNs that make more than the majority of practicing NPs without OT.

Sent from my iPhone.

l/dmom

Has 18 years experience.

Im debating the same issue. Everyone says this degree doesn't offer much more pay than an RN, but I don't want to be doing RN work when I'm in my 60s....and I'm assuming I will still have to work at that age

The other thing is that when an RN gets out of a hospital to a "less taxing" job, the pay is "less". I keep having the same concerns. I am also looking at a WHNP program. I want to further my education. I am going on the thoughts that when I do get my WHNP degree, I could use it in private practice, education, or research.

Am I dreaming????? Thoughts

Riburn3

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

If it's something you want to do, it's worth it no matter your age. The other NP I work with didn't go back to school until she was 45 and had just as much RN experience as you. She tells me her only regret is she didn't go back to school sooner.

Before I started as an NP, I had 8 years of critical care experience, and my sentiment is the same, I wish I had gone back to school sooner because I truly love my role.