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Riburn3

FNP-C, AGACNP-BC
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  1. Riburn3

    NP Wikipedia Article

    I think the issue is the person that edited the article is a preferred editor, sooverriding him/her is more difficult. The article also has a soft lock until November.
  2. Riburn3

    NP Wikipedia Article

    Well it is True True, but I admit one of the program struggles initially was getting the right kind of NPs into the job as it requires a very high level of autonomy and critical thinking (we cover ICU as well). Once we found our core, it’s been smooth sailing, but we did burn through a couple folks quickly that weren’t ready for it. I also dont disagree with your comment about precepting. There are certain schools I won’t precept from, and I usually now only agree to take student that I know.
  3. Riburn3

    NP Wikipedia Article

    Hmmm you sure like to just make up a lot of bologna. My comment on consults was in regard to you saying they would run away at an NP run hospital. My point is lots of NPs isn’t scaring anyone away, we live in an underserved area so many consultants come here to finish their visas, then end up staying. You seem to live in the world and have a mentality that if you haven’t heard of something happening or seen it , then it must not be true. What’s it like being so omnitient?
  4. Riburn3

    NP Wikipedia Article

    It’s sort of funny you mention “an NP run hospital”. I work as a hospitalist in a group that is 50/50 physician and NP hospitalists. We are part of a pilot program by our company to determine if a larger pool of NPs in a group is effective and safe. Effectively our company wants to know if they can get away with this model because we are paid a lot less than the physicians, so it’s a big cost saver. We split the assignments, admissions, acuity, hours worked, committee memberships, and everything else evenly. It’s an independent practice state so there’s no co-signing. After two years, the NPs as a whole have a better satisfaction rating, lower readmission rate, equal length of stay, equal consultation frequency, fewer adverse outcomes, and fewer core metric fallouts. As a result, several of our sister hospitals are eliminating physician positions in favor of more NPs in the practice group. Since our group started this we surprisingly have more consultants that have moved to the area. No one has fled!
  5. Riburn3

    NP Wikipedia Article

    So because those are the only studies you’ve seen makes it definitive I guess? Many states have had independent practice for over 20 years. You’d think it would be all fire and brimstone there with how terrible NPs are. Look at a map of states that have independent practice, and they coincide with some of the healthiest states in the country. Look at the most restrictive practice states ( the south), and you have some of the most unhealthy states in the country. I’m not saying NPs are the cause of that either way, but it’s clearly not a detriment, and just perhaps patients that have greater access to more providers is a good thing, and a net positive. Lets not beat around the bush. Physicians against independent practice are worried about their bottom line. Plain and simple.
  6. Riburn3

    NP Wikipedia Article

    I agree most surgeons are adequate. Most I’ve met are fantastic. When you took a generalized shot at the NP profession and our personality not understanding shortcomings (which had you actually ever been on this site would know there’s literally hundreds of pages worth of NPs discussing the profession and our shortcomings), I decided to make a joke about surgeons. Surgeons are experts at deflecting their own mistakes and shortcomings onto others. Clearly not all of them are, but there’s a reason for the profession being associated with the term “God Complex”. At the end end of the day, comparing education has done nothing to enhance the physician lobby, and more and more states are granting NPs their independence, not the other way around. When I sat in a recent hearing where the government of New Mexico passed a law allowing all APRNs the ability to admit their own patients in a hospital without a physician, the senators asked point blank, if the physicians there fighting the bill had any proof that nurse practitioners, particularly in independent states like New Mexico, provided inferior care or their patients suffered worse outcomes, and they straight up said no proof exists, and spouted on again about education. They were promptly silenced. The bill passed easily and was signed by the governor just this month.
  7. Riburn3

    NP Wikipedia Article

    Clearly never met a surgeon.
  8. Riburn3

    NP Wikipedia Article

    Has anyone taken a gander at this recently? Looks like someone with a pro-physician lobby has gotten ahold of the page and it really casts NPs in a very negative light. Some of the statements like contact hours and education aren’t inaccurate, but they definately go out of their way to make us look bad and it’s very one sided. Many of the “articles” cited are actually just surveys conducted by physicians. Kind of funny. Theres a whole section on “quality of care” that is basically bogus and doesn’t care to reference or mention any articles that are based on systemic reviews that say we actually have better ourcomes than physicians in many regards.
  9. Riburn3

    Real learning happens after graduation

    Hachi machi! Definitely don't recommend waiting that long after graduation to take boards. Boarding within the first month or so yields the best outcomes. Either way, glad you passed!
  10. Riburn3

    Real learning happens after graduation

    Credentialing length is probably the biggest thing people don't realize. For any NP it takes a significant amount of time just to get boarded, licensed, and all your DEA stuff. I graduated in mid December, took and passed my boards 2 days after graduation, and between the time it takes to send transcripts around, I wasn't licensed by the State of Texas until late January. From there it took another 5 weeks for my DPS license to be issued (no longer required in Texas), and another 2 weeks for my DEA license. From graduation to having all my stuff was 3 months. Thankfully I was working in a private practice and didn't need credentialing at a hospital, but when that time came, it was another 8 weeks. I would tell most people planning on working in a hospital after graduation to expect another 6 months post grad in your RN job.
  11. Riburn3

    Why you shouldn't become a nurse practitioner

    Sorryiamanaprn, out of curiosity, where do you live? Your situation sounds absolutely terrible. Was there no inclination that this was the job environment before you started NP school? Or even during your education? I find it almost unbelievable that NP job offers in your area are for less than what new RNs make.
  12. Riburn3

    Why you shouldn't become a nurse practitioner

    Likely based on their own limited personal experience. While I agree that having solid nursing experience during NP school is useful, the closer I get to graduation (3 months away), the more I realize that it probably isn't as important down the road. To start, my CVICU/ICU experience has been huge in helping me understand patho, various medications, and with independent thinking, all critically important to any learning NP student. Additionally, it was really useful in helping me find preceptors because I knew such a wide array of physicians across numerous disciplines. That said, down the road a few years from now, I imagine the differences between myself and classmates that had much less experience going into the program is going to be minimal, and largely based on the work experiences obtained after graduation. I think of it somewhat similar to classmates during undergrad that were seasoned CNA's or MA's during our program, with tons of bedside experience, to individuals like myself that had never stepped in a hospital before the first day of clinicals. During school they had a very large upper hand, but a few years out of school, there probably wasn't a single difference. Overall, the role of any APRN isn't for everyone, and it takes desire and strong constitution to will yourself back to school and completely start anew. Too many people here are focused soley on salary in all aspects, which don't get me wrong, is important. However, that are several other things such as quality of life and personal satisfaction that comes with being an APRN.
  13. Riburn3

    Why you shouldn't become a nurse practitioner

    Very true. When you become an NP you are another provider with a scope of practice that differs greatly from a regular RN. The big difference is the approach to a situation and the type of thinking comes from a nursing perspective. I find myself to be a much better teacher than many physicians I've worked with during my clinicals simply because I've spent so much time teaching patients as an RN. Similarly, previous experience helps, but the quality of that experience is important. I've worked 7 years in critical care, most of it as a charge nurse. The type of nursing I do is very independent and full of critical thought, which has been a tremendous help in my NP program. If I were a cath lab nurse handing over supplies, I probably wouldn't value my experience as much in NP school. Additionally, having experience was a huge asset when it came time to having to find my own preceptors. I can't imagine being less than a year out of school and having to find people.
  14. Riburn3

    Why you shouldn't become a nurse practitioner

    BlueDevil nailed it. Paycut is the only real plausable downside of that entire list, and it likely only applies to a select few. Just about everything else applies to regular nursing as well, and at that point you're opening up a different can of worms.
  15. Riburn3

    To those that have gotten into CRNA school....

    Thanks. Yeah this is helpful. I'm seeing I have fairly similar stats to a few people that have gotten in, and I actually have noticed not too many people have the CCRN in the research I have done. I contacted the admissions director at one of my top choices and asked them what they like, and they told me the CCRN is very useful in helping someone stand out. So I'm very encouraged by this. Thanks again for the info, I'm feeling like I'm a farily strong candidate after reading through these forums and talking to a couple of CRNA's.
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