Is it really this bad every where?

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Has 17 years experience.

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WertDerFerk16, LPN

Specializes in Traveling LPN- < 1 yr; NA-5 years experience. Has 7 years experience. 3 Posts

For anyone reading this thinking it's "really not that bad everywhere," you need to stand back and look at the whole picture and wake up. THIS IS the new reality we live in. I've been working for a major healthcare system for 6 years now. I also have many friends and a few family members that work in the same system and other major healthcare companies in Northeast Ohio, Columbus, New York, Atlanta, Columbus, Boston...and my list goes on. It really IS THIS BAD EVERYWHERE. 

Here's a great example: Starting a PCNA at $13.00 an hour because the company refuses to raise the starting wage to attract more applicants. PCNA's are alone with 30+ patients on our floors, constantly. For $13.00, no one will take on that amount of stress and liability. Not to mention, how UNETHICAL it is for the staff and patients. New grad's are training with an RN and quitting 2-3 weeks after their start date because they're being thrown to the wolves and given 7 patients with high acuities with not having finished the training. 

If you work in medical-surgical, ICU, ED/ER, and Cardiac; you know exactly what I'm talking about. If you don't, or haven't in a long time, since before COVID-19, then you're certainly NOT paying attention. It blows...and there is no end in sight with the nurse to patient load. 

 

 

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 30 years experience. 30,508 Posts

I can relate to some of the stuff.  

We transitioned to Epic recently but had mandatory in-person classes on our days off.  I live in Florida we act like covid doesn't exist so in-person classes were no big deal.  

Our kitchen is a mess, they spontaneous miss meals and ignore requests.  They apparently are having trouble with keeping staff.  Also there seems to be shortages of some things.  Last week it was coffee we were out of, and the week before it was ginger ale.  But at least we've always had juice.

RN staffing remains and issue, but it always has been an issue the 29 years I've worked here.  They are offering bonuses to work extra days but I burned out on that already.  At least we have no work mandates.

I think where ever you re-locate to there are going to be issues.  Good luck!

 

Olivelove20

Specializes in Adult. 41 Posts

9 hours ago, WertDerFerk16 said:

For anyone reading this thinking it's "really not that bad everywhere," you need to stand back and look at the whole picture and wake up. THIS IS the new reality we live in. I've been working for a major healthcare system for 6 years now. I also have many friends and a few family members that work in the same system and other major healthcare companies in Northeast Ohio, Columbus, New York, Atlanta, Columbus, Boston...and my list goes on. It really IS THIS BAD EVERYWHERE. 

Here's a great example: Starting a PCNA at $13.00 an hour because the company refuses to raise the starting wage to attract more applicants. PCNA's are alone with 30+ patients on our floors, constantly. For $13.00, no one will take on that amount of stress and liability. Not to mention, how UNETHICAL it is for the staff and patients. New grad's are training with an RN and quitting 2-3 weeks after their start date because they're being thrown to the wolves and given 7 patients with high acuities with not having finished the training. 

If you work in medical-surgical, ICU, ED/ER, and Cardiac; you know exactly what I'm talking about. If you don't, or haven't in a long time, since before COVID-19, then you're certainly NOT paying attention. It blows...and there is no end in sight with the nurse to patient load. 

 

 

This is exactly why I turned down a recent job offer for IMCU.

The information I was provided in the interview did not jive with the information I saw while touring the unit nor from the employees working.

I also saw a large amount of travel nurses, which this particular hospital in the past, absolutely would not have brought into the facility.

Too many red flags, too many promises made that just did not line up. One of which was being offered the position with the recruiter and director knowing (as I made it clear multiple times) that I had not worked in a hospital setting in 5 yrs. and said repeatedly I would prefer to re-enter on a med/surg unit..

The fact they were willing to bring me on to a unit such as IMCU knowing I was not comfortable re-entering on a higher level of care unit..well, it told me all I needed to know - which is they just needed a body to fill a position. I miss some things about hospital nursing but not enough to risk my license for the benefit of any employer who wouldn't remember my name 10 minutes after I left.

I'm not sure how all this will play out in the end with the nurses being fed up, leaving the profession or organizations depending more and more on travelers but one thing is for sure, everyone who needs healthcare is going to end up paying the price until hospital leadership "wakes up" and realize THEY are the largest part of the problem when it comes to nursing dissatisfaction. If that ever happens.

 

 

salpn

Specializes in School LPN. Has 3 years experience. 10 Posts

15 hours ago, SunDazed said:

Anyone else out of catheter kits?  

Yes, I just talked to our supplier.  I can still get the silicone catheters individually (you are right, the bard kits are not available here).   Fortunately, I don't have too many with foleys, and I've got enough on hand for the end of quarter changeout, but things are going to be real unhappy if I don't have more for the Thanksgiving holidays and the kids have to keep them in over the long weekend.

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in Long term care; med-surg; critical care. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 1,906 Posts

On 10/12/2021 at 11:14 AM, salpn said:

Anyone else out of catheter kits?  

Yikes, we haven't hit that problem yet, but I imagine it's coming. We did run out of mouth care kits for patient on ventilators. That includes a suction splitter that we need to set up our suction sets for both oral suction and ET tube inline suction. So when we open new kits now, we have a stockpile of the splitters because they aren't changed daily with the whole kit. At least if they're out of supply again we can still get some suction set ups.

We've been out of the smart tips syringes for MONTHS! I have wasted so many syringes to switch out the needle for the individually packaged smart tips.

I imagine we're headed for months and years of shortages of everything, including staff. 

salpn

Specializes in School LPN. Has 3 years experience. 10 Posts

I'm hoping things settle down by the end of the year, but with our administration, I've managed to secure enough catheters and "add a cath" and related stuff (leg bags, and cath securing straps) to get us through to January (provided we don't get too many more students that need them).   I'm going to be out of the full kits this Monday when the kids get back from their catheter-free weekend.

 

Kilbourn Word Slinger, BSN

Specializes in 29 yrs nursing, Health Content Writer. Has 30 years experience. 1 Article; 8 Posts

I have empathy for your situation. Sadly, I feel the only way anything may change is if what is happening inside is revealed to the outside. Perhaps the stakeholders are not privy to what you are seeing?  Just a thought. I keep thinking about the saying, “The squeaky wheel is the one that gets oiled.” Best of luck to you! 

CommunityRNBSN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community health. Has 4 years experience. 722 Posts

On 10/11/2021 at 9:48 AM, morelostthanfound said:

     I wouldn't hold much hope in CMS or JCAHO improving staffing ratios or any working conditions for bedside nurses.  Both are total sham agencies in bed with the hospital systems and the last thing they want to do is rankle these powerful (and wealthy) entities.  Their 'surveys'-wink, wink, nudge-are bought and paid for.  Hence, their M.O. is to zero in on BS, non consequential issues like refrigerator temperatures, restraint documentation, tape residue..... I could go on but I digress.

Just FYI here’s what Joint Commission has decided to focus on, according to their social media this week:

 

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BeatsPerMinute, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 8 years experience. 268 Posts

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