Is it okay for RN to ask recovery patients not to swear?

Posted
by SweetieBeeSandy SweetieBeeSandy (New) New

You are reading page 5 of Is it okay for RN to ask recovery patients not to swear?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

eCCU

eCCU

Specializes in CCU, CVICU, Cath Lab, MICU, Endoscopy.. Has 14 years experience. 215 Posts

Sounds like this was their way of coping with the pain. I'd be more concerned with managing it than what coming out of their mouth. Besides every one has different tolerance levels.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience. 6,878 Posts

Best get out of PACU if you so proper. Patients that are in pain are going to use their vernacular to express it.

How exactly, do these "dirty" words hurt you?

cynmrn

cynmrn

Specializes in School Nursing, Telemetry. Has 2 years experience. 124 Posts

I don't think it's terrible to ask a patient politely to stop swearing if it makes you uncomfortable. Yes, making a big deal of it and causing drama or being rude to the patient because they aren't complying would be inappropriate, but I'm not sure why everyone thinks it's insane to just request they watch their language. Just because you're a nurse, doesn't mean you don't deserve respect, and sometimes the use of foul language is seen as disrespect if you're not the swearing kind.

Personally, I don't really care if they're not swearing AT me and there aren't other patients nearby that might hear and be offended.

Wrench Party

Wrench Party

Specializes in Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Surgical. Has 3 years experience. 823 Posts

Almost all of my post-CABG, post-sternotomy patients swear like sailors, especially their first day out of the ICU and transitioning to PO pain meds. Doesn't matter race, gender, etc. Usually they're more lucid and way more horrified the next night I get them, and they apologize profusely. I tell them swearing increases pain tolerance! :D

Personally, as long as it's not directed at me or someone else, I don't care. Curse till you're blue in the face!

Libby1987

Libby1987

3,726 Posts

Good grief I was thinking the hard part of my job has been telling patients it's time for hospice and I read this post. I can't imagine being bothered by someone swearing coming out of anesthesia and in pain.

I echo everyone else.

AnonBoston

AnonBoston

1 Article; 10 Posts

Haven't they shown that swearing can increase your pain tolerance? As long as it isn't directed at me, I wouldn't care. I have worked with nurses that actively encourage patients in pain to swear. She said: "Honey let it fly, because if you don't, I'll do it for you". Sometimes just swearing or making a patient laugh is therapeutic

As a frequent patient these last few years, I can confirm that YES, letting loose with a good run of "f--k f--k f--k...." is extremely therapeutic mentally, and also therefore physically.

If I have the opportunity though, I will ask permission first. Like the first time I had my first NG tube pulled out. I said "wait, do you mind if I swear? I think it might help a bit" and that wasn't the only time. They never say no, it's always "if that helps you get through this, you go ahead and do it".

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 41 years experience. 4,292 Posts

I had to have an incision and drainage of an axillary abscess 2 years ago. The anaethetist suggested using ketamine as conscious sedation as it would have meant I didn't need to be intubated during surgery and the recovery time would be easier.

I woke up from surgery thinking I was an 80 year old Mexican woman (I was 37 and european) on my way to market and had been stopped by red coat soldiers on my way to market. I could have sworn I was speaking spanish, the people around me were speaking spanish, i could see the buildings and the market place. Now if a pacu nurse had of told me to stop swearing, i think my brain would have simply interpreted it as another person trying to stop me from getting to the market.

My point, I feel you were being over sensitive. Now if the patient was saying "nurse you are a blanketity, blank blank, blanks" you would be well within your rights to ask him to stop swearing. However people often wake up in pain. They are also dealing with the impact of a general anaesthetic if it was about you, then no, not ok. If you were concerned that his swearing might be upsetting to the patients around him, fair call

Oh my goodness, were you reliving a past life? That was a fascinating experience.

Amen to that... where is the compassion?

WheresMyPen

WheresMyPen

129 Posts

Oh man. You would hate some of my patients then. I work in LTC SNF. When I change this one pt's wound vac she calls me a little wh***. I love it though. Keeps the job interesting 😂

WheresMyPen

WheresMyPen

129 Posts

Good attitude. In response to OPs response.

Magsulfate, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 13 years experience. 1,201 Posts

I dropped dozens of f bombs when I was coming out of anesthesia. It didn't even cross my mind that I might have been offending someone because I hurt like crazy. I don't normally use foul language but I'll probably do it again if I'm faced with the same situation.

Horseshoe

Horseshoe, BSN, RN

5,879 Posts

I don't think it's terrible to ask a patient politely to stop swearing if it makes you uncomfortable. Yes, making a big deal of it and causing drama or being rude to the patient because they aren't complying would be inappropriate, but I'm not sure why everyone thinks it's insane to just request they watch their language. Just because you're a nurse, doesn't mean you don't deserve respect, and sometimes the use of foul language is seen as disrespect if you're not the swearing kind.

We're not talking about an oriented person. The OP is referring to a patient coming out of anesthesia! Why would anyone hold a person who is under the effects of anesthesia to the same standards as a person who is alert and oriented? The nurse's "comfort" and desire for "respect" has no standing in this situation because the patient is not in total control of their actions. Imo, she needs to get over it because it's really not about her.