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Interested in the medical field: Nurse or Doctor?

Posted
by Klareh Klareh (New) New

After a long time searching the job market, I have become frustrated with lack of anything that can support my family and give security. I've always had an interest in medicine as a career path, but was never sure where I would fit in.

Both paths seem interesting, but I was wondering if you kind folks with experience on the floors could tell me what would suit me best?

Picking one path is years of commitment, time, busting butt and a big debt, so I definitely want to pick the right one!

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I enjoy using my hands, have no problem getting messy. I want to be hands on, doing sutures, cuts, figuring out x-rays and helping solve the problem with the patient.

I enjoy figuring out puzzles and deduction thinking.

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Problem: I am 27, and I was raised in a household that could care less about my academic success. I was in Gifted and Talented in Middle School, but since my parents didn't care, I stopped caring too. Because of this, I have nothing impressive from my highschool to show to a potential college to start pre-requisites.

Would this matter? Or would the pre-requisites be the time to shine before I apply to my next potential path?

How hard is it to get into Nursing/Doctor schools?

I am planning to rock my GPA in college, so no worries about that part. Is it too late? Would the financial strain of becoming a doctor be too heavy?

THANK YOU for anyone who read all of this. It means a lot to me. I want to give my husband and son a happy, comfortable life!

Both are competitive to get into.

Obviously, becoming a doctor takes longer and costs more. It's not too late, but it is a financial burden

Both are competitive to get into.

Obviously, becoming a doctor takes longer and costs more. It's not too late, but it is a financial burden

Indeed.

How hands on are Nurses? I'm leaning towards Nursing as the time schedule is very appealing.

mindofmidwifery, ADN

Specializes in ICU Stepdown.

Indeed.

How hands on are Nurses? I'm leaning towards Nursing as the time schedule is very appealing.

Nurses are way more hands on than doctors in general. It does vary depending on why type of doctor or what type of nurse you want to be. Nursing school is a lot quicker and cheaper, starting at only one year of schooling.

Nurses are way more hands on than doctors in general. It does vary depending on why type of doctor or what type of nurse you want to be. Nursing school is a lot quicker and cheaper, starting at only one year of schooling.

Oh fantastic!

Which type of Nurse does sutures and/or cutting?

Thanks so much everyone for your replies. They mean a lot!

mindofmidwifery, ADN

Specializes in ICU Stepdown.

Oh fantastic!

Which type of Nurse does sutures and/or cutting?

Thanks so much everyone for your replies. They mean a lot!

I'm not completely sure. I think it varies. I've seen both techs and LPNs do sutures.

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

Nurses won't do surgical procedures, so you'd have to cross that off your list.

Nursing school and med school will look at your college grades leading up to application. Also you'll find school a bit less daunting after getting started because as a "grown up", you've hopefully learned how to prioritize time in an uncomplicated way.

Both are extremely competitive and accept the best and brightest. If it makes you feel any better, many nurses didn't start school until their 30a-50s. Age is just a number, and you'll eventually hit 30, 31, 32 and older with or without progress toward a career. I'd rather have a career (and made that choice at .27-28).

If hands on, time with patients, and really knowing them is important to you, stick with nursing. You will also find yourself part of the diagnostic process as well, you just won't be the one whose responsibility it is to solve the mystery. I personally like that.

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

(Also, the media lies - most patients are not diagnostic mysteries.)

anewsns

Specializes in Neurosciences, stepdown, acute rehab, LTC. Has 8 years experience.

You can also look into mid level practitioners , such as a nurse practitioner or PA.. I agree nurses are more hands on but you'll have to be a doc to do surgeries... I think NPs and PAs can do some more minor procedures while deciding on treatment plans for tbe patient.. You could also get your RN , see if you prefer that , and if desired , continue on to get your NP

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

You can also look into mid level practitioners , such as a nurse practitioner or PA.. I agree nurses are more hands on but you'll have to be a doc to do surgeries... I think NPs and PAs can do some more minor procedures while deciding on treatment plans for tbe patient.. You could also get your RN , see if you prefer that , and if desired , continue on to get your NP

Oh goodness don't use that term!

Oh fantastic!

Which type of Nurse does sutures and/or cutting?

Thanks so much everyone for your replies. They mean a lot!

NPs do sutures. Hopefully no nurses are "cutting". If you mean surgery, only NPs do minor surgery.

Mavrick, BSN, RN

Specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU. Has 30 years experience.

Nursing school is a lot quicker and cheaper, starting at only one year of schooling.

What kind of school would that be?

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

I'm not completely sure. I think it varies. I've seen both techs and LPNs do sutures.

Suturing is not in the scope of practice of RN, LPN or MA. Suture removal is within the scope of RN, LPN and certain MAs. . Sutures are within the scope of physicians, dentists, surgeons, some advanced practice nurses, and some physician assistants. Surgery is physician, surgeon, dentist. First assist and minor surgery may be within the scope of certain PA-C's and advanced practice nurses

mindofmidwifery, ADN

Specializes in ICU Stepdown.

Suturing is not in the scope of practice of RN, LPN or MA. Suture removal is within the scope of RN, LPN and certain MAs. . Sutures are within the scope of physicians, dentists, surgeons, some advanced practice nurses, and some physician assistants. Surgery is physician, surgeon, dentist. First assist and minor surgery may be within the scope of certain PA-C's and advanced practice nurses

Actually, some states/facilities do allow RNs to place minor sutures.

Mavrick, BSN, RN

Specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU. Has 30 years experience.

ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON

That's it! All that banging around fixin' stuff. Sometimes a lot of blood 'specially with revisions. Solving problems on the fly. What plate or screw will fit in this particular situation. And the most X-Ray reading.

That'll be $1.00 career consultation fee.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON

That's it! All that banging around fixin' stuff. Sometimes a lot of blood 'specially with revisions. Solving problems on the fly. What plate or screw will fit in this particular situation. And the most X-Ray reading.

That'll be $1.00 career consultation fee.

Watch Napolean Dynamite MD on youtube.

Mavrick, BSN, RN

Specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU. Has 30 years experience.

Watch Napolean Dynamite MD on youtube.

Really, Boston! Where is my link???

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

Um, maybe the ones that don't require any pre-reqs for their LVN programs? Example: LVN (Licensed Vocational Nursing)

MOM, please take this as advice, not criticism, as it truly is intended to strengthen your ability to make strong, valid points come across as such.

Using the word "um" when in a written conversation takes away the ability to have everything after it be taken seriously. Remove "um", your point is well made and valid. Add "um", and it doesn't matter if it is valid, it's attitude-laden and will not be taken seriously.

We have a one-year LPN program here and to complete it in one year, the pre-requisites are taken as co-requisites. I would not in a million years approach nursing school this way because you are learning patho plus nursing interventions without knowing the a&p or micro beforehand. This makes it impossible to put all nursing concepts together while learning them because you lack the basics.