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I'm leaving my first nursing job, how do I tell my coworkers?

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by Heartonmysleeves Heartonmysleeves, RN (New Member) New Member Nurse

4 Likes; 128 Visitors; 7 Posts

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Next month I am transferring to a different floor on a different campus. But I don't know how to tell my coworkers I'm leaving. The reason its hard for me to tell them is because I have had a rough year as a new grad nurse on this floor. Overall, I'm disappointed with most of my coworkers because when I went to the nurses I trusted that I was being bullied they didn't care and made it seem like it was my fault it happened to me. Let me explain.

I would get remarks like "you're not assertive enough," "that's not cool" and "I wonder if that would happen to (new grad coming soon who they know)." When the bullying occurred with other nurses watching, they didn't say or do anything and wouldn't approach me to see how I'm doing. I was too embarrassed for a long time to say or do anything because I felt personally attacked and felt it was my fault.

It wasn't until I was fed up that I reached out to a nurse I trust (and have known for years) and who actually listened to me! That nurse understood me and encouraged me to speak up! That nurse told me to listen to my gut. My gut always told me that the way I was being treated wasn't right. My gut told me that those nurses I told first did not care and did not have my back.

Long story short, I told my manager and I prayed something good would come out of it. And it did! The bullying stopped immediately. I still work with said bully but I don't put up with their intimidation tactics.

From that point forward, I decided to focus on myself and patients. I didn't want to socialize with and spend time with those who disappointed me because it hurt that they didn't help me when I needed them the most. Them being seasoned nurses, they knew what was happening but decided to let me to continue to suffer.

Now that I'm leaving, I don't want them asking me questions about my new endeavor. I don't want a going away party, hugs or well wishes from them because to me it feels fake and superficial. I'm not an extrovert or outgoing like most of them so for me, I don't want the attention.

I wish I could just work my last shift and not tell but those who I still trust. However, I know since nursing is a small world and I probably will see some again, I feel like I need to leave on a good note and be professional.

So I wonder, how should I tell my coworkers I'm leaving?

*thank you for reading until the end, it has been a rough year*😕

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23 Likes; 2,091 Visitors; 85 Posts

I personally wouldn’t say anything. If my coworkers weren’t supportive I would just quietly go on with my life and consider it a learning experience. Good luck with your new job.

Edited by jobellestarr

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1,159 Likes; 7 Followers; 21,349 Visitors; 2,703 Posts

You can choose to leave with an air of perseverance and positivity, or an air of defeat.

We're all different, but I would strongly consider the former.

Simple: Plate of cookies on your last day, place in break room accompanied by note/card:

"Hi, all -  I've accepted a position in _________ and just wanted to take the opportunity to say good-bye and wish 2 West all the best in the future~" [sign your name]

Remember: How they choose to receive it is on them.

Edited by JKL33

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Persephone Paige has 15 years experience as a ADN and works as a Med-Surg.

305 Likes; 3 Followers; 1 Article; 3,145 Visitors; 578 Posts

We flatter ourselves by thinking we'll be missed. I like the cookie idea, if you feel you really must take 'a parting glass.' Then, skip to my Lou outta there.

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not.done.yet has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Professional Development Specialist.

301 Likes; 4 Followers; 42,894 Visitors; 5,177 Posts

You don't have to tell them anything. Chances are your manager will share it at a staff meeting or your friend you trust will quietly share it. You will be surprised how swiftly you and they all move on. Just work out your notice being the best nurse you can be and on your last day, smile and say goodbye the way you always do, then walk to your car and feel that weight come off your shoulders.

Best of luck in your new job. I hope you find what you are looking for.

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Lololololoollkkgddfuih has 50+ years experience and works as a CRNA.

-10 Likes; 153 Visitors; 31 Posts

You know what to do, just do your best and try to be as nice as possible. There is nothing to worry about. 

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JackChase1212 has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Surgical Nurse.

28 Likes; 179 Visitors; 25 Posts

First, I’m so sorry that you experienced this behavior. It is definitely still an issue...in 2019. :( Second, hold your head up high as you leave and say very little. You owe them nothing. Sad situation, but unfortunately not uncommon.

Good luck to you 🙂

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traumaRUs has 25 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

505 Likes; 14 Followers; 127 Articles; 185,027 Visitors; 20,515 Posts

No reason to tell them.

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by Orca

Orca has 22 years experience and works as a Corrections RN/DON.

70 Likes; 1 Follower; 25,563 Visitors; 1,728 Posts

You don't owe them an exit speech. If this is not a group who you are close to, let them find out after you're gone.

Edited by Orca

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4 Likes; 128 Visitors; 7 Posts

On 2/6/2019 at 12:28 PM, JackChase1212 said:

First, I’m so sorry that you experienced this behavior. It is definitely still an issue...in 2019. :( Second, hold your head up high as you leave and say very little. You owe them nothing. Sad situation, but unfortunately not uncommon.

Good luck to you 🙂

I wish more nurses were like you and agree that this type of behavior is unnecessary. Thank you for the well wishes!!

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RNNPICU has 13 years experience.

99 Likes; 11,692 Visitors; 874 Posts

On your last day, bring a cake or something and a note saying thank you.  It is always good to leave on a good note.  If people ask just say you are transfering to a different unit.  

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