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If the US started a system like the NHS in the UK should nurses expect a cut in pay

Posted

I believe that in the UK the nurses who work in the NHS get paid less than their US counterparts.

They get paid much less. I know if an ICU nurse in the UK who posted her pay. It was the equivalent of $15.73 an hour here.

And yes, if we went to a single payer system, nurses would get paid less. Our ratios would be higher as well.

Tenebrae, BSN, RN

Specializes in Mental Health, Gerontology, Palliative. Has 9 years experience.

3 hours ago, LovingLife123 said:

They get paid much less. I know if an ICU nurse in the UK who posted her pay. It was the equivalent of $15.73 an hour here.

And yes, if we went to a single payer system, nurses would get paid less. Our ratios would be higher as well.

nope on the ratios

I work in a single payer system

ICU: 1:1

ICU step down 1:2

Med surg 1:3-5, I once had five patients on a weekend, however it was a young patient who went to theatre and was minimal care. Usually numbers between 3-4

Acute pysch: 1:2-4. Usually I have a load of 3, however on a bad day that may get up to four.

K+MgSO4, BSN

Specializes in Surgical, quality,management. Has 12 years experience.

Single payer has less costs to the tax payer. UK, Ireland and Australia and NZ all pay less tax for health than US (have the textbook somewhere with the reference). Also less outgoings for nurses as not paying massive HI premiums.

Disagree about ratios.

Everywhere I worked ICU 1:1 HDU 2: 1 med surg 4-6:1.

What's the pay and ratio for CNAs?

Tenebrae, BSN, RN

Specializes in Mental Health, Gerontology, Palliative. Has 9 years experience.

18 hours ago, K+MgSO4 said:

Single payer has less costs to the tax payer. UK, Ireland and Australia and NZ all pay less tax for health than US (have the textbook somewhere with the reference). Also less outgoings for nurses as not paying massive HI premiums.

Disagree about ratios.

Everywhere I worked ICU 1:1 HDU 2: 1 med surg 4-6:1.

And I think better health outcomes and longer life expectancy

Tenebrae, BSN, RN

Specializes in Mental Health, Gerontology, Palliative. Has 9 years experience.

15 hours ago, DaniDesi P said:

What's the pay and ratio for CNAs?

All CNAs had a pay raise a few years ago in New Zealand. The mimum starting wage is about $20. Goes up to a maximum of about $25 I think

Working in aged care the ratios arent brilliant. Fully staffed in the mornings its usually about 1:6. In the afternoons 1:8 working on the premise less full care is done in the afternoons. Working in the public hospital you usually dont have a set patient ratio, you are there as auxillary staff to help out the nurses, however the work load is still better because you are only working as a CNA role. In aged care often you are expected to do CNA role, kitchen duties, laundry duties etc

On 4/27/2020 at 2:08 AM, Tenebrae said:

nope on the ratios

I work in a single payer system

ICU: 1:1

ICU step down 1:2

Med surg 1:3-5, I once had five patients on a weekend, however it was a young patient who went to theatre and was minimal care. Usually numbers between 3-4

Acute pysch: 1:2-4. Usually I have a load of 3, however on a bad day that may get up to four.

I’m just going off of what I saw a UK ICU nurse state.

I also couldn’t survive in the US on 15-16/hr. Right now, I have a two income household to afford life. I live in a major metropolitan area raising 3 children. I’d have to take two jobs working 60 hours a week as opposed to my 36 I work now which works well with my boys and all they’d activities. My husband works 50 hours a week.

GrumpyRN, NP

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 39 years experience.

On 4/27/2020 at 1:27 AM, DesiDani said:

I believe that in the UK the nurses who work in the NHS get paid less than their US counterparts.

What's your point? Nurses in the NHS get 7-10 weeks paid annual leave. Nurses in the NHS get 6 months full pay and a further 6 months half pay if they are off sick. They get up to a year paid maternity leave. They have better job security than US and costs are different.

Nurses in the NHS don't have to pay for healthcare it is included in their national insurance - NO bills regardless of cost or length of treatment. In Scotland and Wales you don't pay for prescriptions. As stated by a previous poster UK also has better life expectancy than US.

57 minutes ago, LovingLife123 said:

I also couldn’t survive in the US on 15-16/hr. Right now, I have a two income household to afford life. I live in a major metropolitan area raising 3 children. I’d have to take two jobs working 60 hours a week as opposed to my 36 I work now which works well with my boys and all they’d activities. My husband works 50 hours a week.

Excuse my language but.... sod that... No nurse in the UK needs to work 2 jobs especially if they are in a double income family, and the fact your husband has to work 50 hours a week is just appalling, 40 hours for full time work is the norm (nurses work 37.5 hours). Occasionally some nurses will do bank shifts or agency shifts for a bit of extra cash but not 2 jobs. There are also extra pay for working weekends, unsocial hours and overnight. Any overtime worked is paid at time and a half and double time for Sundays.


I have stated this in other threads but it is irrelevant what the hourly rate is as costs are different. The pay rate quoted was the starting salary for a brand new staff nurse and it goes up every year.

It is also a bit disingenuous of the OP to title the thread, "If the US started a system like the NHS in the UK should nurses expect a cut in pay." and then to comment about what UK nurses earn as the UK is not the only country with socialised medicine. Danish nurses average ~$41/hr, French nurses ~ $30/hr, Italian nurses ~ $12/hr, German nurse $20/hr. (Figures given are averages).

Well Grumpy. You are making way too much over a question. I'm sure it is fitting. If you like you can include "pay cut with the benefit of free healthcare and maternity leave". What's wrong by the way of asking if US nurses should expect a pay cut? Truth is truth, even if you do get the extra benefits.

Thanks for the insight and info, much appreciated

11 hours ago, Tenebrae said:

. In aged care often you are expected to do CNA role, kitchen duties, laundry duties etc

There isn't a seperate staff to do laundry and kitchen? At nursing homes CNA get paid less, but they don't have to do kitchen or laundry duty whatever that is?