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If you can't pass the NCLEX after three attempts....LVN license only!

Posted

Has 21 years experience.

I just read in another thread that some Boards of nursing are allowing multiple attempts at taking the NCLEX exam. Is this true? If so, this is ridiculous! If we are trying to elevate the profession by requiring a minimum BSN to practice, then why are we allowing multiple attempts at taking the NCLEX? No reputable profession would allow this. If you can't pass it after three attempts then you shouldn't be allowed to practice as an RN. Boards of nursing should grant them an LVN license only!

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

While I agree that unlimited attempts at NCLEX are ridiculous I'm not necessarily a fan of "elevating" the profession by requiring a BSN and find the assertion that those who aren't capable of passing RN NCLEX should be given their LVN offensive. I have worked with more than a few LVN/LPNs who blew the doors off the average BSN especially as new grads.

macawake, MSN

Has 12 years experience.

I just read in another thread that some Boards of nursing are allowing multiple attempts at taking the NCLEX exam. Is this true? If so, this is ridiculous! If we are trying to elevate the profession by requiring a minimum BSN to practice, then why are we allowing multiple attempts at taking the NCLEX? No reputable profession would allow this. If you can't pass it after three attempts then you shouldn't be allowed to practice as an RN. Boards of nursing should grant them an LVN license only!

That's hardly the solution. LVNs need to be safe/competent nurses, just like RNs.

Perhaps it's not your intent, but your post is quite insulting to LV/PNs. Their license isn't something you award a person who didn't pass the NCLEX RN as a consolation prize.

Edited by macawake

Here.I.Stand, BSN, RN

Specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro. Has 16 years experience.

Well, to be awarded an LPN/LVN license, shouldn't they have to pass the NCLEX-PN? I'm of the opinion that there should be a cap on attempts, possibly with formal remediation...but after that, no-go. We don't need to award anyone a license to practice nursing for their demonstrated lack of ability to pass a licensure exam.

Your conclusion that a person who fails NCLEX three times is incapable of being a safe nurse is flawed. There are no facts to support this conclusion.

neonurse97

Has 21 years experience.

Forgive me but I was not trying to insult LVNs. I am frustrated that people are being allowed to take the NCLEX 4 or 5 times. When I graduated, you could only take the NCLEX three times max, then you needed remediation. This really needs to stop! I agree that maybe the solution should be to allow them to take the NCLEX-PN only.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 10 years experience.

LPN is not a consolation prize or a junior RN. Practical nurses have a different educational tract and scope of practice. Very few states consider RN education sufficient for a candidate to sit for the NCLEX-PN.

Handing an LVN license to someone who fails the NCLEX-RN 3x is nothing more than insulting. There are nurses who have written both exams and found the NCLEX-PN more difficult than the NCLEX-RN!! Several have failed the RN version and lived in a state that allowed RN students/grads to take the NCLEX-PN and failed that too.

Whether it is test anxiety, insufficient critical thinking, insufficient content knowledge, or poor test taking skills remediation is needed prior to a candidate gaining eligibility to retake the exam.

The NCLEX-PN & NCLEX-RN are minimum competency levels expected of a novice new grad nurse. Regardless of the reason for failing to meet the passing standards in all content areas, the candidate is not safe or competent to practice as a nurse regardless of license type.

neonurse97

Has 21 years experience.

Your conclusion that a person who fails NCLEX three times is incapable of being a safe nurse is flawed. There are no facts to support this conclusion.

My thing is that if this profession is all about being elevated (BSN minimum to practice), then why are people allowed to take this exam until they pass it? Are doctors allowed to take their boards 7 or 8 times? Are lawyers allowed to take the bar 7 or 8 times? Maybe I'm missing something here.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

My thing is that if this profession is all about being elevated (BSN minimum to practice), then why are people allowed to take this exam until they pass it? Are doctors allowed to take their boards 7 or 8 times? Are lawyers allowed to take the bar 7 or 8 times? Maybe I'm missing something here.

Again "elevated" is a relative term, imo.

Forgive me but I was not trying to insult LVNs. I am frustrated that people are being allowed to take the NCLEX 4 or 5 times. When I graduated, you could only take the NCLEX three times max, then you needed remediation. This really needs to stop! I agree that maybe the solution should be to allow them to take the NCLEX-PN only.

If one cannot pass the RN NCLEX what makes you think they would pass the PN NCLEX so easily. I have taken and passed BOTH the PN and RN NCLEX. BOTH exams were equally difficult . They

just differ in content. In order to pass the NCLEX you need to have excellent test taking skills.

My thing is that if this profession is all about being elevated (BSN minimum to practice), then why are people allowed to take this exam until they pass it? Are doctors allowed to take their boards 7 or 8 times? Are lawyers allowed to take the bar 7 or 8 times? Maybe I'm missing something here.

You are missing something. Firstly, the premise for your conclusion is that NCLEX is capable of determining who is capable of being a good nurse. Which is false. I passed NCLEX with the minimum amount of questions and barely felt challenged in the slightest bit. I am a terrible nurse. Once you put your passion and prejudices aside, you can see that NCLEX is a crude tool designed to ensure that students have a minimum knowledge base to practice safely. Like all tools, it's predictive abilities are limited, and far from being 100% accurate. Some students don't test well, perhaps they get very nervous with so much of their future hanging in the balance, or perhaps they were poorly prepared. Personally, I'd be more apt to blame the school than the student. At the very least, if 3 tries at NCLEX should be the max, then any student unable to pass after three attempts ought to be entitled to a refund from their university.

WookieeRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in PACU. Has 3 years experience.

That would be an absolute slap in the face to all the hard work LPN/LVNs go through to become licensed.

neonurse97

Has 21 years experience.

Again, no one should be allowed multiple attempts (more than 3) at passing the NCLEX-RN. Remediation should be mandatory after that many attempts. Something is clearly wrong. If the profession is to become elevated, BSN minimum, then NCLEX_RNmax attempts should be 3...period.

Again, no one should be allowed multiple attempts (more than 3) at passing the NCLEX-RN. Remediation should be mandatory after that many attempts. Something is clearly wrong. If the profession is to become elevated, BSN minimum, then NCLEX_RNmax attempts should be 3...period.

Why 3? Why not 2 or 4 or even 1? If NCLEX is so accurate, shouldn't 1 chance be enough? Can you reference any facts that support 3 as being the magic number, or is that just a gut feeling?

Your opinion is just as valid as any other, but I'm curious if you would hold the same opinion if the shoe were on the other foot. How would you feel if you had just spent 4 hard years of your life grinding away and $40,000 on getting your nursing degree from a university, and then being banned for life after having trouble with passing your NCLEX?

Perhaps NCLEX could share some of their data with the rest of us before making such rash decisions like denying people their license. We could look at what kind of questions were missed most frequently in students who failed. There are likely patterns to be discovered by analyzing that data, which could alleviate the problem by making changes to the RN educational requirements.

Why relegate sub-standard to the practical nurse profession?

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 15 years experience.

I just read in another thread that some Boards of nursing are allowing multiple attempts at taking the NCLEX exam. Is this true? If so, this is ridiculous! If we are trying to elevate the profession by requiring a minimum BSN to practice, then why are we allowing multiple attempts at taking the NCLEX? No reputable profession would allow this. If you can't pass it after three attempts then you shouldn't be allowed to practice as an RN. Boards of nursing should grant them an LVN license only!

An LPN license is not a consolation prize for those unable to pass the NCLEX-RN. A graduate of a nursing program needs to prove competency for the program he/she completed. If one cannot pass NCLEX-RN and wishes to attempt NCLEX-PN, then he/she needs to start an LPN program (excepting states that allow for challenging NCLEX-PN once a portion of the program is completed, but the challenging needs to be done at the appropriate time, not after failing NCLEX-RN).

ThePrincessBride, BSN

Specializes in Med-Surg, NICU. Has 5 years experience.

I keep seeing this topic time and time again...people:

85% pass the NCLEX the FIRST time.

50% pass the NCLEX of those who failed the first time pass the second time.

Do the math, and that leaves about 7.5% of people who fail after the second attempt. I am not sure why people are so hung up on a topic that doesn't even apply to approximately 92.5% of the nursing population.

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