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I Have An Idea; Please Don't Steal It; Many Witnesses Here

Nurses   (3,353 Views 24 Comments)
by jill48 jill48, ASN, RN (Member)

jill48 is a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Geri, Ortho, Telemetry, Psych.

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Has anyone ever thought of somekind of internal device for diabetics that delivers the appropriate amount of insulin automatically? If they can make an internal defibrillator, why can't there by an internal device that measures blood sugar and delivers insulin? Am I just throwing out a crazy idea or does this have some merit? Not that I would have $1000 for a patent. If I had that, there would be glow in the dark pacifiers floating around right now with my name on them.:idea:

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javanurse2000 specializes in Geriatric/LTC, rehab, home health.

4,069 Visitors; 189 Posts

Its an excellent idea, but already being used in practice:

Insulin Pumps: American Diabetes Association®

I hope you are encouraged that your idea, although already developed was worthy of pursuit!

Edited by Joe V

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purple_rose_3 has 6 years experience and specializes in Intensive Care and Cardiology.

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All kinds of people use insulin pumps. Sorry, but this has already been invented.

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AnnieOaklyRN is a BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in ED, Pedi Vasc access, Paramedic serving 6 towns.

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umm how would you refil the insultin if it was all internal?? They arleady have insulin pumps avalable and I think that is the only way that it woudl work since again you would need a way to refil insulin, and that would put the patient at significant risk for infection if the pump and all were internal.

Swtooth

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8,078 Visitors; 643 Posts

http://www.minimed.com/

This device doesn't automatically administer the insulin, but does continuous monitoring.

"It is important that you continue to use your meter to confirm sensor glucose readings before treatment, particularly since the FDA has approved REAL-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) with conservative labeling. This labeling requires patients to take a fingerstick measurement before adjusting therapy, as well as for calibrating the CGM system." --from the website.

The advantage is that this product can plot trends, which, along with the confimatory fingerstick, give pt and MD much more info on the pt's condition.

Oldiebutgoodie

Edit--let me reword that-it is an insulin pump, but administers insulin based on program, or when pt administers. It does not automatically administer based on the glucose reading of its sensor.

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llg has 40 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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A problem I see with the general idea (for routine use) is that a blood glucose of X does not automatically warrant an insulin dose of Y. A lot of situation factors need to be considered in the interpretation of the blood glucose. The person would have to input those factors into the device before "telling it" to give the dose of insulin.

For example, it is normal for blood glucose to go up during and immediately after a meal. The machine would have to know that the patient was eating and not misinterpret that blood glucose level the same way it would interpret the same number in a fasting state.

If the person is going to have to input all the situational variables so that the device's computer chip can correctly determine the insulin dose, then the device would not really "save time or effort" ... it would just switch the nature of the work from one task to another.

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UM Review RN is a ASN, RN and specializes in Utilization Management.

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A problem I see with the general idea (for routine use) is that a blood glucose of X does not automatically warrant an insulin dose of Y. A lot of situation factors need to be considered in the interpretation of the blood glucose. The person would have to input those factors into the device before "telling it" to give the dose of insulin.

For example, it is normal for blood glucose to go up during and immediately after a meal. The machine would have to know that the patient was eating and not misinterpret that blood glucose level the same way it would interpret the same number in a fasting state.

If the person is going to have to input all the situational variables so that the device's computer chip can correctly determine the insulin dose, then the device would not really "save time or effort" ... it would just switch the nature of the work from one task to another.

Most of the systems deliver a continuous basal dose and then the pump is programmed by the user to deliver bolus doses, based on the situations you mention. Most of the people I know who use these pumps are brittle diabetics who have to accucheck quite frequently and the delivery system keeps them closer to euglycemia.

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queenjean has 9 years experience and specializes in medical.

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Maybe the pump could be refilled by an access port, similar to an implanted chest port or something.

Defibrillators are programmed externally all the time; why not a small hand held device that reads the internal pump ( for things like how full it is, how much bolus to give, any malfunctions, etc) as well as can program it externally?

I think this sounds extremely expensive, but in 20-30 years, who knows? EVERYTHING is extremely expensive it seems to me.

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jmgrn65 has 16 years experience as a RN and specializes in cardiac/critical care/ informatics.

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Has anyone ever thought of somekind of internal device for diabetics that delivers the appropriate amount of insulin automatically? If they can make an internal defibrillator, why can't there by an internal device that measures blood sugar and delivers insulin? Am I just throwing out a crazy idea or does this have some merit? Not that I would have $1000 for a patent. If I had that, there would be glow in the dark pacifiers floating around right now with my name on them.:idea:

It is called an insulin pump, sorry someone already had the idea .

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Dolce specializes in Day Surgery, Agency, Cath Lab, LTC/Psych.

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I have totally thought about that before! It would be such a cool thing. An insulin pump only delivers insulin, it does not check BGs. The pump could be programed to check BGs and deliver insulin on a continuous and bolus basis, like the pancreas does. I think that it may be a problem to have it internal (how would the insulin be stored) but it may work similar to the external pumps that are currently being used. Really, somebody ought to make one of these.

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