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I hate my current job and want to work in a hospital

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by nr92 nr92 (Member)

nr92 has 1 years experience .

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martymoose works as a rn.

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Also ,the kiddos aren't likely to bite and punch,and I mean right hook punch,you during your shift.my coworker got kicked in the head.

They never told us about that kind of stuff in nursing school.

If that doesn't bother you along with all the other negatives others have come up with, then give it a whirl.id suggest getting certified for cna while you are in school,and maybe do that part time, or as a patient care person in a hospital.

Then maybe you can get some reimbursement.i didn't get any reimbursement as I didn't have the hospital job until after I got my rn.and I'm still paying loans ,10years later.😖

Good luck.

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I think the best thing you can do for yourself is educate yourself about what you have in your local area as far as employment. You say you hate to change diapers, I translate this into I hate to take care of personal issues patient are having. I have changed diapers and "incontinent" products so much in my career I probably changed more than Ms Michelle Dugger (the woman who has approximately 20 kids). Only you can decide what is best for you and for us to search and tell you would be a disservice to you.

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anewsns has 8 years experience.

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In the hospital you'll be changing lots of diapers and also you'll always be exhausted. You'll be lifting big people and handling adult whining and crying. What role would you be in? I saw you said you have an idea of the responsibilities of a nurse. It's probably whatever you think PLUS changing poopy diapers and lots of them. As nurses one of our roles is called "CNA-A". "Certified nurses assistant-assistant" and believe me if you are the type that stays out of manual labor then it will bite you in the end and you'll be doing most of your own CNA work because CNAs would rather help the nurses who help them. No matter how your day goes, you'll be exhausted at the end. A lot of new nurses have to work nights. You'll be exhausted making 22-30 dollars an hour. If you're a person who thinks this will be easier because you'll be making more, it's going to be even harder. There will be a huge reality check as you realize you'll be maxing out your physical, emotional, AND mental limits rather than just the emotional limits of changing toddler diapers. You have to be ready for a challenging and rewarding life where you earn every penny, rather than an easier and less exhausting, higher paid one. If you start as a CNA, you'll be making less than you do now for much harder work. Hospitals that offer tuition reimbursement also hire the best new grads, you'll have to be ready to quickly hang a life saving dilt drip while suctioning a trach while starting a tube feed followed by changing a poopy diaper.

Edited by anewsns

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36 Likes; 10,223 Visitors; 1,369 Posts

As far as tuition reimbursement, I don't know where you live so I can't really say.

But as far as being sick of changing diapers there are lots of jobs where you don't have to do that. Psych tech, patient sitter, unit clerk are fantastic jobs for nursing students that do not involve diaper changing.

Yes, you will have to do it again in nursing school, but once out you can also take a no diaper changing nursing job, even right after school. I did.

Not to pick on you Folks, but I think the advice you gave is unusual and very facility specific. In my experience...

Psych techs: CNAs in a psych ward. There will be patients who cannot or will not toilet themselves. The stories I could tell from my psych unit days....

Sitters: also CNAs who are taking care of the patient one on one. The patients are usually medically complicated and/or with behavior challenges, so they are strong candidates for needing toileting assistance.

Unit secretaries: may also be cnas cross trained to the desk... the expectation of many places is that they can help out of the floor in a pinch.

Also, while it's not impossible to get a non-toileting nursing job right after graduation, I can't think of one in the hospital.

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Meriwhen is a ASN, BSN, RN and works as a Psychiatric sheep...er, nurse.

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But as far as being sick of changing diapers there are lots of jobs where you don't have to do that. Psych tech, patient sitter, unit clerk are fantastic jobs for nursing students that do not involve diaper changing.

Not every psych patient that walks through my doors is continent, and no, this isn't just limited to med-psych. The incidence of toileting patients may be lower than on your average medical floor, but it's a very real possibility. So scratch psych tech off of that list.

Patient sitter...well, we don't expect them to help with that patient's care--their job is to watch the patient like a hawk, stop them from doing anything unsafe, and let us know ASAP if there's an issue. Though a lot of the sitters we have in our place will help pitch in if the patient they are sitting needs some toileting, we don't demand that they do. So that one is a "maybe." Could go either way, really.

Unit clerk: now there's the one job that doesn't involve bodily fluids. Not usually anyway--remember, nothing is ever really normal in psych.

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Wants to be a nurse in a hospital, but first wants to be an aide in a hospital so the hospital pays for RN education.

Also believes basic patient care is beneath them.

Good luck, OP. Can't see how this could go sideways.

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Been there,done that has 33 years experience and works as a case manager.

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any other positions besides front office? names of tuition reimbursement hospitals in NY?

Let me google that for you. Perhaps, I could also help you change that diaper.

Seriously, YOU need to research positions in your area and hospitals that offer tuition reimbursement.

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Hi,

How about speech therapy or physical therapy. Maybe respiratory therapy. All of these involve lots of school. .

It doesn't seem like OP is in a position to take on lots of school at the moment, and these are all require at least as much or more than nursing. RNs can work with an associate degree, or even a diploma in the states that still have diploma programs.

Physical Therapists need a bachelor's degree and then a graduate degree in PT, usually a doctorate. Speech therapy is usually at least a bachelor's degree, and requires a master's degree to be come state licensed as a speech language pathologist. Respiratory Therapy is the most comparable to nursing, having programs at the associate and bachelor degree levels prior to certification.

I actually think these are all good career suggestions that generally bypass the poop we deal with in nursing. However, they aren't quick, easy, or inexpensive routes to a good job.

Since OP is asking for nursing programs with tuition assistance, I assume there is a financial hurdle to overcome, making PT and SLP out of reach at the present time.

RT programs are often found at the community college level for about the same price as ADN programs. It's not the same as having an employer pay tuition, but it's a fairly affordable route to a stable career.

OP, you might also look into some other technical healthcare jobs like sonographer, which is also usually a two-year associate's degree.

I realize you're taking a bit of a beating on here, but I really think you do need to reexamine why you think nursing would be a better fit for you. There are many, many jobs out there that don't deal with poop on the regular, and one of them would probably be a better fit. I strongly encourage you to look at other options.

Edited by turtlesRcool
clarity

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anewsns has 8 years experience.

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It's like saying you're a cashier and you're sick of handling cash all day so you want to work as a bank teller instead and make a little more money handling cash all day. There are thousands of non diaper related jobs in the world.

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Psych is not an escape job. It has its own stressors.

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