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How long did you study for the NCLEX

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How many weeks should you start studying for the NCLEX? I want to study as soon as possible to get the best grade I can. Is there a thing as too early?

technically you "study" for the NCLEX while you are in your nursing program. Then most students start a review, using various programs and books, shortly following graduation or even shortly prior to graduation. 

This review is generally question banks that offer tips on answering the different type of questions, help to review information learned and the opportunity to identify and brush up on areas of weakness, and build testing stamina (tip: prepare to answer the max number of questions so you don't risk testing fatigue regardless of the number of questions you get.)

Depending on where you are in your nursing program, you may also find these sources helpful during your course testing since programs design exams in "NCLEX style."

Best of luck. 

PS -

There is no grade for the NCLEX.... it is PASS or FAIL.

Hannahbanana, BSN, MSN

Specializes in Physiology, CM, consulting, nsg edu, LNC, COB. Has 51 years experience.

Four years. Passed the first time. 

There is definitely no such thing as studying too early. Some people need a lot of time to build up to answering 100+ questions so they start early doing 25 a day then 50 then 100 and so on. Some people have the stamina but need a review that helps them with rationales to understand how to answer certain questions. And some people just take the first available appointment after they get their ATT because they feel like if they wait they will forget what they learned in school. Answering some questions everyday and looking at the rationales and only going to study material of things I know I am weak on worked for me so I really only “studied” for a couple days before the test but one of my last classes was basically all NCLEX prep questions with rationales so I probably did thousands of questions my last semester so you could say I studied for months. One of my friends did practice questions every day from the first day of nursing school so you can say she studied for years. Depends on your personality and what you testing weakness are

5 hours ago, kandi.kendall said:

There is definitely no such thing as studying too early. Some people need a lot of time to build up to answering 100+ questions so they start early doing 25 a day then 50 then 100 and so on. Some people have the stamina but need a review that helps them with rationales to understand how to answer certain questions. And some people just take the first available appointment after they get their ATT because they feel like if they wait they will forget what they learned in school. Answering some questions everyday and looking at the rationales and only going to study material of things I know I am weak on worked for me so I really only “studied” for a couple days before the test but one of my last classes was basically all NCLEX prep questions with rationales so I probably did thousands of questions my last semester so you could say I studied for months. One of my friends did practice questions every day from the first day of nursing school so you can say she studied for years. Depends on your personality and what you testing weakness are

Thank you for the reassuring post. I am in my last semester of school and am nervous to sign up and take the NCLEX, as well as start applying for new grad programs. I hope everything works out!

Tacocat, ADN, RN

Specializes in Community/Public Health. Has 1 years experience.

What semester of school are you in? 

After I graduated, I took a mental break for a week or two, and then I did about 4 weeks of studying with UWorld while I waited for my ATT and booked my exam for the first available date.

Edited by Tacocat

8 hours ago, mc156 said:

Thank you for the reassuring post. I am in my last semester of school and am nervous to sign up and take the NCLEX, as well as start applying for new grad programs. I hope everything works out!

I remember that feeling so well! It wasn’t that long ago for me! It is so nerve wracking. I tried to just take one task at a time. I would say broadly that practice questions at the best preparation. The more you can do, the better. And read all the rationales. Then go over notes on areas that you are weakest in. At least that is what my school pushed and our passing rate is 98%. As for applying, if you haven’t already focus on your resume and cover letters. I tailored each one to the job I was applying for. I did it before the jobs even opened up. I just thought about what that job would need and tailored both to show how I have those skills. Then prepare your behavioral interview questions. An interviewer told me to use the STAR method and to use a very specific example to answer each question. She said they get general answers all day and it doesn’t help them get to know you. It is so nerve racking but you can do it. One step at a time!

1 hour ago, Tacocat said:

What semester of school are you in? 

After I graduated, I took a mental break for a week or two, and then I did about 4 weeks of studying with UWorld while I waited for my ATT and booked my exam for the first available date.

I haven't started yet, I am entering my first semester this fall. I want to know is it worth it to start now or should I settle into the program first and give it maybe a semester or two to start studying.

On 6/15/2021 at 11:33 AM, 203bravo said:

technically you "study" for the NCLEX while you are in your nursing program. Then most students start a review, using various programs and books, shortly following graduation or even shortly prior to graduation. 

This review is generally question banks that offer tips on answering the different type of questions, help to review information learned and the opportunity to identify and brush up on areas of weakness, and build testing stamina (tip: prepare to answer the max number of questions so you don't risk testing fatigue regardless of the number of questions you get.)

Depending on where you are in your nursing program, you may also find these sources helpful during your course testing since programs design exams in "NCLEX style."

Best of luck. 

PS -

There is no grade for the NCLEX.... it is PASS or FAIL.

Thank you, I didn't know there wasn't a grade and here I am freaking out.

Tacocat, ADN, RN

Specializes in Community/Public Health. Has 1 years experience.

1 hour ago, cblossom78 said:

I haven't started yet, I am entering my first semester this fall. I want to know is it worth it to start now or should I settle into the program first and give it maybe a semester or two to start studying.

Thank you, I didn't know there wasn't a grade and here I am freaking out.

At the risk of sounding mean...you can't start studying for NCLEX if you haven't even started the program. What material would you study, if you haven't had a class? You don't even know how to answer NCLEX-style questions yet. Start with learning your class material first. As you learn, you can reinforce your learning with practice NCLEX-style questions. 

How can you study for something you haven't learned yet? 

 

 

10 hours ago, Tacocat said:

At the risk of sounding mean...you can't start studying for NCLEX if you haven't even started the program. What material would you study, if you haven't had a class? You don't even know how to answer NCLEX-style questions yet. Start with learning your class material first. As you learn, you can reinforce your learning with practice NCLEX-style questions. 

How can you study for something you haven't learned yet? 

 

 

You don't sound mean at all, you're 100% correct. I should take this one step at a time and shouldn't rush into anything before I even started yet. 

Neo Soldier, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatry. Has 6 years experience.

On 6/18/2021 at 6:51 AM, Tacocat said:

After I graduated, I took a mental break for a week or two, and then I did about 4 weeks of studying with UWorld

Excellent advice. Taking a mental break is necessary before the NCLEX. I took one as well. 

Medic2RN72, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Medicine, Critical Care, Research.

I graduated 05/17, got my ATT on 24th. I took NCLEX on the 28th. I figured that I've been studying for NCLEX the entire time. Now the 2nd part to this is that all my "indicators" stated that I was ready. My exit HESI score was 921 (benchmark was 900). I passed the CAT HESI. Before I started UWorld, the 1st assessment stated "Highly Likely to pass". At 75% of test bank completion, I was at 63% (put me at 86% percentile). After listening to Mark Klimek audios, I figured now is my shot, and I have a better chance NOW, than latter! I moved my date up from 06/15, to 06/03, to 05/28 at the last minute. I'm glad I did! NO AMOUNT of study would have prepared me any different. I passed at 75. You have to look at your indicators........ just my 2 cents...good luck!