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How would you feel if a dentist was your boss?

Nurses   (609 Views | 19 Replies)

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U.S. nursing research institute appoints dentist as interim director

The National Institute for Nursing Research, which disburses federal grants, recently announced that its interim director would be...a dentist. But non-nurses are non-qualified to evaluate grants for nursing research. And the appointment reinforces the inaccurate stereotype that nurses are unskilled handmaidens, rather than autonomous health professionals.

Join the petition here https://truthaboutnursing.salsalabs.org/ninr/index.html

In August 2019, a dentist and a biologist were appointed interim director and deputy director of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), after the resignation of Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN. NINR is the division of the U.S. National Institutes of Health that makes grants for nursing research, and its FY 2019 budget was about $163 million. It should be obvious that non-nurses are in no position to ably perform these important nursing jobs. Would NIH appoint a nurse to oversee dental research funding? But what may be less obvious is the damage such appointments cause to nursing as a whole. They wrongly suggest that nursing is not a distinct health profession, but something anyone with some health-related background can do.

In fact, nursing is an autonomous profession with a unique knowledge base and scope of practice. Nurses are educated by nurses, licensed by nursing bodies, and supervised by nurses in the clinical setting. Nurses independently engage in 24/7 surveillance to detect and resolve life-threatening problems. And nurses spend many years obtaining doctorates in nursing so they can pursue their own ground-breaking research, sometimes with funding granted by NINR. The idea that a non-nurse could competently oversee an elite nursing institution or evaluate proposals for nursing research with a view to spending taxpayer dollars on them presents a threat to both nursing and society. Most decision-makers do not understand the value of nursing or know that nurses save lives. So nurses do not receive enough respect or resources. Clinical nurses are understaffed, threatening patients' lives. Many nursing faculty are also overworked and underpaid. The stereotype of nurses as low-skilled handmaidens who need physicians to oversee them remains common, fueled by the news media and of course Hollywood. (We admit that suggesting nurses need dentists and biologists to oversee them is an innovation.) But damaging ideas about nursing can also be fueled by public sector leaders who make high-profile decisions that reinforce these inaccurate stereotypes, as this one by NIH does. Please join our campaign to urge NIH to reverse these interim appointments and immediately appoint qualified nursing leaders instead!

Join the petition here https://truthaboutnursing.salsalabs.org/ninr/index.html

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Nurse SMS has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

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Signed. How shocking.

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1,702 Posts; 17,747 Profile Views

I am fine with this.

As long as he doesn't mind if I put in his next filling.

 

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Rodman has 25 years experience.

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Please keep in mind that this is research oriented and not as over the top as you might think.  The dentist has a terminal clinical doctorate with a PhD.  That makes him/her qualified for this position.

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wtbcrna is a MSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

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1 hour ago, Rodman said:

Please keep in mind that this is research oriented and not as over the top as you might think.  The dentist has a terminal clinical doctorate with a PhD.  That makes him/her qualified for this position.

And if a nurse was placed in charge of dental or medical research there would be an even larger outrage by their respective professional organizations. 

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beachbabe86 specializes in Oceanfront Living.

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1 hour ago, Rodman said:

The dentist has a terminal clinical doctorate with a PhD.  That makes him/her qualified for this position.

Really, how?

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Rodman has 25 years experience.

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3 hours ago, wtbcrna said:

And if a nurse was placed in charge of dental or medical research there would be an even larger outrage by their respective professional organizations. 

The nurse is not a doctor

3 hours ago, beachbabe86 said:

Really, how?

This is a research position that is how

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

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Rodman - I understand your logic.

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12 minutes ago, Rodman said:

The nurse is not a doctor

He or she certainly could be a PhD RN. (I assume you didn't mean the nurse is not a physician, since that would mean your logic is inconsistent).

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Rodman has 25 years experience.

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A PhD nurse would be appropriate depending on what the PhD is in.  The key here is that the director has to be well versed in the research process.  The people at the NIH design clinical trials and then parse the data   The PhD would most likely have to be in one of the basi sciences-- Biochem, Pharmacology, Physical Chemistry, Analytical Chem etc etc  Not many nurses have those PhDs as their undegrad education does not have the core sciences to qualify them for those grad programs.

6 minutes ago, JKL33 said:

He or she certainly could be a PhD RN. (I assume you didn't mean the nurse is not a physician, since that would mean your logic is inconsistent).

Physician with a PhD in the sciences who could sign off on clinical trials in this case

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12 Followers; 3,807 Posts; 28,688 Profile Views

7 minutes ago, Rodman said:

The people at the NIH design clinical trials and then parse the data   The PhD would most likely have to be in one of the basi sciences-- Biochem, Pharmacology, Physical Chemistry, Analytical Chem etc etc

Okay, but then what you are saying overall with this ^ comment, is that the person should have a PhD in a discipline that is core to the nature of the research.

Not trying to argue, but I think people (in whatever discipline) would tend to have a natural concern about things other than just having a director with the technical qualifications to sign off on clinical trials.

That person could also be expected to be making decisions about what research is going to be funded, for example, and what kind of efforts or research is deemed worthy of pursuing in the first place. For  reasons like that I think it's natural to want someone who has some sort of skin in the game that directly relates to the profession in question.

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