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Hating Nursing Currently

Nurses   (4,901 Views 36 Comments)
by vanaly vanaly (New Member) New Member

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AnnieNP has 20 years experience as a MSN, NP and specializes in Adult Primary Care.

1 Follower; 3,337 Visitors; 443 Posts

I was terrified my first year as a nurse. When I started my first job (a long time ago) one of the nurses in charge of hospital orientation told our group to consider the first year on the job as our last year of school!!! I kept an index card in my pocket and every shift I would write down things that I needed to read about before going back to work. It was my own homework assignment. It really did help me. Take a deep breath and know you are not alone.

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1 Follower; 12,902 Visitors; 1,600 Posts

Yep,

You have described the first year of nursing!!!! It gets better. Hang in there!!! Good Luck we have all been there & are here for you

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Meriwhen is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

2 Followers; 4 Articles; 59,231 Visitors; 7,879 Posts

Welcome to reality shock. It's when new grads leave the ivory tower NCLEX nursing world and start working in the real world, where they don't have unlimited supplies/resources/time, where things don't always go as planned, where patients/coworkers/administrators aren't always grateful for the hard work nurses put in, and where the NCLEX answer doesn't always solve the problem.

It does get better. Everyone's already given you great advice.

And it's OK to cry if you need to, as that is a form of stress release. Don't feel bad in the least for doing that. Though do try to time it for when you're alone or at least off the floor, as it can be a bit awkward having to explain tears to a patient :)

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Medic_Murse has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-P.

855 Visitors; 96 Posts

As someone that worked in a hospital setting for several years (even during school), and in no way am I saying this is you, but I would always get a kick out of the students that had little to no experience in healthcare. They would tout their 4.0 GPA's and look down on other students that weren't that book smart. I would sit there through classes and just chuckle, shake my head, and sigh. I've seen that attitude before and knew they were in for a rude awakening. You don't learn squat in nursing school (as a previous poster alluded to) the real learning starts day one on the job.

Now! More relevant to your situation. There are two types of new grads that come in...the one that knows everything, gets overwhelmed (when they realize that GPA didn't mean squat), refuses to learn and shut down. Then there are those that get overwhelmed, have a small brake down, but then pick themselves up and face the challenge head on refusing to be defeated! Be that person! Don't give up!

For example, several years ago I was working in an ER and the patient of the new grad deteriorated rapidly and she did the right thing by yelling for the doctor. I ran in as she was doing compressions, I yelled at her to stop and I'd take over. She was frozen, I told her to get him hooked up to the pads....think like a nurse. She bolted around that room like I've never seen someone move! By this time we had the entire ER in there working the patient. By the time the situation was under control, and most were leaving, I looked around and she was gone. I found her in the staff room literally curled up in a ball and crying. I looked at her and asked, "What the hell is this?" She explained she was in over her head and no clue what she was doing and she's a horrible nurse and should quit. I sat next to her, and said, "Possibly, but did the patient die?" She said no, and I told her...you know what you're doing, but you have to realize...this isn't sim lab, this is the real deal. You handled yourself well for a new grad and that I was proud of her.

Tell ya something. She's now a Nurse Practitioner in emergency medicine and damn good at it. Don't give up on yourself, keep plugging away. You know the basics, just build on it and if you need a little bit of help...ask for it. You'll do great things, I'm sure of it.

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Have Nurse has 25 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg/Infection Control/Geriatrics.

15 Articles; 7,881 Visitors; 713 Posts

Are you working with a Preceptor? If not, request one. A kind and strong Preceptor is like gold! Being organized and prioritizing is something that is necessary, but it will strengthen over time if you make it a habit. Please don't lose heart!

This is very normal. Ask for help and guidance. No one hits the bulls eye on the first arrow, Honey. In addition to being kind to your patients, be kind to yourself. You are well on your way, you'll see!!

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Have Nurse has 25 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg/Infection Control/Geriatrics.

15 Articles; 7,881 Visitors; 713 Posts

As someone that worked in a hospital setting for several years (even during school), and in no way am I saying this is you, but I would always get a kick out of the students that had little to no experience in healthcare. They would tout their 4.0 GPA's and look down on other students that weren't that book smart. I would sit there through classes and just chuckle, shake my head, and sigh. I've seen that attitude before and knew they were in for a rude awakening. You don't learn squat in nursing school (as a previous poster alluded to) the real learning starts day one on the job.

Now! More relevant to your situation. There are two types of new grads that come in...the one that knows everything, gets overwhelmed (when they realize that GPA didn't mean squat), refuses to learn and shut down. Then there are those that get overwhelmed, have a small brake down, but then pick themselves up and face the challenge head on refusing to be defeated! Be that person! Don't give up!

For example, several years ago I was working in an ER and the patient of the new grad deteriorated rapidly and she did the right thing by yelling for the doctor. I ran in as she was doing compressions, I yelled at her to stop and I'd take over. She was frozen, I told her to get him hooked up to the pads....think like a nurse. She bolted around that room like I've never seen someone move! By this time we had the entire ER in there working the patient. By the time the situation was under control, and most were leaving, I looked around and she was gone. I found her in the staff room literally curled up in a ball and crying. I looked at her and asked, "What the hell is this?" She explained she was in over her head and no clue what she was doing and she's a horrible nurse and should quit. I sat next to her, and said, "Possibly, but did the patient die?" She said no, and I told her...you know what you're doing, but you have to realize...this isn't sim lab, this is the real deal. You handled yourself well for a new grad and that I was proud of her.

Tell ya something. She's now a Nurse Practitioner in emergency medicine and damn good at it. Don't give up on yourself, keep plugging away. You know the basics, just build on it and if you need a little bit of help...ask for it. You'll do great things, I'm sure of it.

I can sense that you mean to offer her encouragement here, as we all are, but excuse me. I must take exception to your idea of "you don't learn squat in nursing school."

I had exceptional instructors and lots of clinical both as a L.P.N., (more actually,) and as a R.N. student.

If it wasn't for my education, my patients WOULD have died.

But as I stated earlier, I know you mean to help......(smile)

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665 Visitors; 14 Posts

I didn't have this experience but I have previous medical experience and started nursing in the ICU, with lower ratios. So it wasn't terrible.

However, I have floated to med-surg floors and felt that way. It's just brutal and unsafe for patients to have ratios like that. 1:7 with no tech, I feel like patients are going to have to wait after calling for something, because we can't be in 7 places at once, and have to prioritize. I hate to have a bad attitude, but the hospitals are to blame for call bell wait times, not me. I do not like this type of work and I genuinely don't know how people do it.

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Leader25 has 35 years experience.

2 Followers; 4,641 Visitors; 796 Posts

Sometimes it is forever,as soon as you get comfortable along comes administration with we are changing this,now you have to also do that,no OT,NOt enough staff etc. Sigh

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RNpathoteacher has 23 years experience and specializes in OB/L&D/ patho.

820 Visitors; 27 Posts

We all go thru this as new nurses. Once you are more comfortable, in a year or so, it will be better! You are still learning and it is tough!

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411 Visitors; 5 Posts

Thank you all so much

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ChristineS2004 has 7 years experience.

318 Visitors; 3 Posts

It is so normal to feel this way. Running around with my head cut off, never taking a break for the whole shift, and cry when you get out. It does get better. I end up trying hospice and after 7 years I feel like it was my calling along with oncology. Good luck! You can do it.

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