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Gloves or not for IV meds?

Shibby3 Shibby3 (New) New

So in my 3rd year of nursing we have a class simulation on how to be supportive and informative "buddy nurses" as nursing has the inevitable duty of educating student nurses. In this simulation I was to pretend to be a buddy nurse to a 2nd year student and guide my student in administering IV antibiotics.

As we were about to administer it we both put on gloves, which the educator then walked in and questioned why we were wearing gloves. On my clinical placements I was always instructed to wear gloves giving medication through the IV, blood present or not.. The educator argued that unless it was not a one way valve cannula, or if there was no blood/bodily fluids present there is no need to wear gloves in this situation. I would partially agree with this, however I would rather my student always wear gloves in this situation than not wear them when it is necessary. I was a little bit annoyed at this, is it really that necessary to savour the resources of gloves to put a student at risk?

So who wears/doesn't wear gloves in this situation and why?

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department.

I normally wouldn't. You're not dealing with blood/body fluids. You're dealing with a port that's upstream of the cath. You're not uncapping the port are ya? No? Then clean the port per instructions... and go from there. Now if the clinical site requires that gloves be worn, then wear them.

As long as you're able to maintain a good aseptic technique, the port will remain clean regardless of you wearing gloves. Here's another issue: Depending upon the drug, I'd consider gloves to minimize my exposure to the agent, not the patient. Make sense?

IVRUS, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vascular Access.

So in my 3rd year of nursing we have a class simulation on how to be supportive and informative "buddy nurses" as nursing has the inevitable duty of educating student nurses. In this simulation I was to pretend to be a buddy nurse to a 2nd year student and guide my student in administering IV antibiotics.

As we were about to administer it we both put on gloves, which the educator then walked in and questioned why we were wearing gloves. On my clinical placements I was always instructed to wear gloves giving medication through the IV, blood present or not.. The educator argued that unless it was not a one way valve cannula, or if there was no blood/bodily fluids present there is no need to wear gloves in this situation. I would partially agree with this, however I would rather my student always wear gloves in this situation than not wear them when it is necessary. I was a little bit annoyed at this, is it really that necessary to savour the resources of gloves to put a student at risk?

So who wears/doesn't wear gloves in this situation and why?

When exposure to blood or body secretion is possible, wear gloves.

When giving an IV medication, or hanging an IV bag, I don't wear gloves either. If I touch or accidently contaminate a portion of the tubing, like the spike, it's just as contaminated with my glove as it would be with my hand. And gloves can increase the possibility of contamination IF the gloves aren't form fitting.

Hope this helps.

I wear gloves no matter what I'm doing in a patient's room. The main reason is because I also work as a tech in a hospital and every day I see people go from changing a messy diaper to touching handrails, IV poles, remotes, the patient, etc.

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics.

I don't wear gloves when giving IVP meds or hanging bags. It's a needless system, (at least where I am at) and I clean all the ports with alcohol really good.

I wear gloves doing anything! We're taught to do so, so therefore I do. I can never imagine not wearing clothes....it has become such a habit. I feel safer wearing them.

blackandyellow

Specializes in CVICU, CCU, MICU.

The hospital I work in I never see people wear gloves but when I do anything I always wear them. I don't know what my hands are touching and who's hands have been there with what on them before.

Seas

Specializes in Telemetry, OB, NICU.

I don't wear them when doing y-port IVP, IVPB, or regular IV fluids. I wear them when I am working on a saline-locked IV line.

I see no reason to. Walk in. Ask name and DOB. Find line. Swab port with alcohol. Insert needleless device. Squirt. Judge for effect. Exit.

Now, I don't touch bodies or products from them without gloves. I won't even touch their hands without gloves. Mostly because it makes me feel too personal with them. I know that's weird, but whatever. There is the whole body funk element though.

I see no need to do it on an IV line.

That Guy, BSN, RN, EMT-B

Specializes in Emergency/Cath Lab.

IV and central lines no. If I am drawing bld from a central line yes. Art line yes, but just hanging a bag or pushing a med, no way.

Oops....meant to say GLOVES not clothes, lol! Actually can't imagine walking around the hospital naked either!

msjellybean

Specializes in Emergency.

Only time I wear gloves with IVs are when I'm hanging blood, drawing labs, or hanging/pushing chemo. It's really useless to do so otherwise.

sandyfeet

Specializes in Emergency Nursing.

So in my 3rd year of nursing we have a class simulation on how to be supportive and informative "buddy nurses" as nursing has the inevitable duty of educating student nurses. In this simulation I was to pretend to be a buddy nurse to a 2nd year student and guide my student in administering IV antibiotics.

As we were about to administer it we both put on gloves, which the educator then walked in and questioned why we were wearing gloves. On my clinical placements I was always instructed to wear gloves giving medication through the IV, blood present or not.. The educator argued that unless it was not a one way valve cannula, or if there was no blood/bodily fluids present there is no need to wear gloves in this situation. I would partially agree with this, however I would rather my student always wear gloves in this situation than not wear them when it is necessary. I was a little bit annoyed at this, is it really that necessary to savour the resources of gloves to put a student at risk?

So who wears/doesn't wear gloves in this situation and why?

My instructor this semester was really big on "knowing WHY you are doing things". In your situation, for example, my instructor would perceive it as "this person thinks they are going to be exposed to blood or body fluids by giving IV drugs" and question if you really understood what you were doing. This may be why the educator questioned you as well.

I don't wear gloves giving IVPs or IVPBs because I'm not putting myself at risk. I always have gloves in my pocket in case something happens while I'm at the bedside, and I wash my hands with soap and water when I'm done.

To everyone feeling safe by wearing gloves: they are not 100% sealed. There is an acceptable amount of pores or holes allowed in manufacturing. To quote my instructor again, "Ask anyone who ever got pregnant while using a condom!"

From what I have seen If your swabing the port with alcohol your way ahead of the game.

noyesno, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Family Medicine.

Oops....meant to say GLOVES not clothes, lol! Actually can't imagine walking around the hospital naked either!

I do all my IV meds naked but I do wear gloves.

[JK, clothes and no gloves for IV meds.]

That Guy, BSN, RN, EMT-B

Specializes in Emergency/Cath Lab.

I do all my IV meds naked but I do wear gloves.

I think I saw that in a movie once....

melmarie23, MSN, RN

Specializes in L&D/Maternity nursing.

don't let the JC catch you without your gloves or not washing your hands when going into or leaving a pt's room. I wear gloves almost always-not so much for my benefit, but for the patient's. And I am super anal about hand washing. Better to get myself in the habit of always doing it now, so that I am not tempted to slack on this later on.

NicuGal, MSN, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PACU.

Actually, you should be wearing gloves when accessing ANY line, PIV, AL or central. This is a huge thing to prevent IV/Central line infections. If you got caught without gloves in my place of employment you would get a talking to. Also, if JC or the Health Dept are in house your unit will get a ding for not wearing gloves. Do a search on Central line bundles and what they entail...even changing bags you should be wearing gloves. It isn't just to protect you, but your patients also. If I saw you accessing my line, PIV or not you'd get a few words from me!

IVRUS, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vascular Access.

Actually, you should be wearing gloves when accessing ANY line, PIV, AL or central. This is a huge thing to prevent IV/Central line infections. If you got caught without gloves in my place of employment you would get a talking to. Also, if JC or the Health Dept are in house your unit will get a ding for not wearing gloves. Do a search on Central line bundles and what they entail...even changing bags you should be wearing gloves. It isn't just to protect you, but your patients also. If I saw you accessing my line, PIV or not you'd get a few words from me!

If you wear gloves, when spiking a bag of IV fluids, and you accidently touch the tip of the sterile spike (perhaps because your gloves are too big), haven't you contaminated the set just as you would have if you accidently touched it with your hand... YES. Are you exposed to blood, in this procedure... NO... So, an organization should not bring a punitive approach to any individual in this instance! Think it through...

dandk1997RN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology.

I wear gloves doing anything! We're taught to do so, so therefore I do. I can never imagine not wearing clothes....it has become such a habit. I feel safer wearing them.

Love this! I prefer wearing clothes, too. (Excuse me for picking on the typo- you made my morning.) ;~)

Back to the original question...aren't you always assessing the IV site by palpating before you give the patient any new IV fluids? If you are (which according to my training, you should) you are possibly going to be exposing the patient to your germs or you to theirs, and therefore, you would need gloves. JMHO

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