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Getting OOB during a Blood Transfusion

Nurses   (9,739 Views | 19 Replies)
by PAKRHMC PAKRHMC (New) New

782 Profile Views; 8 Posts

At our hospital it is a Policy that patients need to stay in bed while they are getting a Blood Transfusion. I am trying to find information from othe rhospitals that may allow patients OOB during the Transfusion. Can they get OOB after the first 2 vital signs or right away? Any other pertinent info???

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KacyLynnRN has 14 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg.

303 Posts; 5,409 Profile Views

You know, I have always been told at my hospital, pt.'s should stay in bed for first 15 minutes, get a set of vitals, then they can get up to go to BR, really don't want them out walking in the halls or anything, but no real restriction unless otherwise ordered. That's just what my preceptor told me when she orientated me 2 years ago. I will have to check out our policy on that and make sure!! :rolleyes:

Kacy

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meownsmile is a BSN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho.

2,532 Posts; 10,745 Profile Views

If after the first 15min.(2 sets of vitals) and pt shows no signs of reaction, as long as they are asymptomatic of low H/H i dont see why they cant be up as tolerated. We have people that come in for transfustions we dont even put in a bed, we let them sit in a recliner, dose them up with their units and let them walk out by themselves.

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8 Posts; 782 Profile Views

If after the first 15min.(2 sets of vitals) and pt shows no signs of reaction, as long as they are asymptomatic of low H/H i dont see why they cant be up as tolerated. We have people that come in for transfustions we dont even put in a bed, we let them sit in a recliner, dose them up with their units and let them walk out by themselves.

I work on an Orthopedic floor and we would like to get patients up to a chair after the first 15-30 minutes of a transfusion. If anyone has a written policy stating this That'd be great! Thanks:)

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1 Article; 5,758 Posts; 32,967 Profile Views

The only thing I object to is unit to unit transfers during blood transfusions. If a patient is coming to my unit from another and has been typed and cross matched with order to infuse they have to stay on other unit untill blood is done. Other than that I think they should at least be allowed to BR. Would you want to use a bedpan during a transfusions? I sure would not. However, I work with nurses that will not allow a patient out of bed during transfusions and I can't figure out why.

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2,399 Posts; 11,962 Profile Views

I would think that if I needed a unit of PRBCs I wouldn't feel much like getting OOB anyway. :chuckle

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unknown99 is a BSN, RN and specializes in Inpatient Acute Rehab.

933 Posts; 8,891 Profile Views

After 1st 1/2hr we let them up and about their room, assuming there are no complications and they are steady enough to be up.

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587 Posts; 7,135 Profile Views

The only thing I object to is unit to unit transfers during blood transfusions. If a patient is coming to my unit from another and has been typed and cross matched with order to infuse they have to stay on other unit untill blood is done. Other than that I think they should at least be allowed to BR. Would you want to use a bedpan during a transfusions? I sure would not. However, I work with nurses that will not allow a patient out of bed during transfusions and I can't figure out why.

Hi Oramar,

What do you do in cases of ER transfers? I've transferred patients w/FFP/PRBC's etc from the ED because it's an emergency. I wouldn't hold a patient in the ED just for blood if he/she is tolerating the transfusion and VS are stable (after the first 1/2 hour).

I don't know why you wouldn't get the patient OOB if they are not symptomatic and can stand w/o dropping. It's better for the patient to do for himself/herself.

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zacarias has 14 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in tele, stepdown/PCU, med/surg.

1,334 Posts; 15,300 Profile Views

This reminds me of a situation that happened at work a few months ago. There was this nurse that was always rude to me and for some reason she didn't like me. She made me feel bad a lot even though everyone else liked me.

Well, I had a patient with blood running and I told her I waited until after the blood was done before sending him to a routine X-ray I think. She got all tiffy with me because she said you can send people with blood anywhere. *I* wasn't comfortable with it.

Turns out the facility has a new policy that says a person with a blood transfusion going can't go anywhere unless accompanied by a nurse.

It just irritates me because nurses like her will always believe that they're right and I'm wrong.

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178 Posts; 3,112 Profile Views

i don't work in any hospital setting but i get frequent blood transfusion due to my illness - i have thalassemia major. so usually they let me do anything, go anywhere however never out by the floor without a nurse. if i need to see someone and its not an emergency then the nurse would cap my IV and send me off by myself to the place where i want to go. i guess it depends on the hospital policy. sorry it's not coming from a hospital staff but this is what i know for nearly 22 yrs.

but once i heard that when i was little getting a regular blood transfusion the resident would not allow my parents to acompany me. i wasn't sick at that time but thought it was werid....

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1 Article; 5,758 Posts; 32,967 Profile Views

Hi Oramar,

What do you do in cases of ER transfers?

Since I work on rehab unit we don't get transfers from ER. I don't know what they do out on the regular floors. We have new protocols that say a person has to be typed and cross matched again if they are transfered to new unit before they can be given blood. Since it would be a shame if the patient has to be stuck again they usually stay and get their blood on the unit where original type and cross match was drawn.

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boggle is a ASN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg.

393 Posts; 6,058 Profile Views

My big question is WHY? Why should we limit the activity of patients getting blood transfusions? Can anyone cite sources telling why? Is it a concern about the patient having a reaction? Is it a concern about the blood product spilling or the flow being altered?

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