Omsbudsman experiences?

  1. I'm training to become a volunteer omsbudsman/ resident advocate. I'm really exited about doing this, but wanted to know what the omsbudsman looked like from the point of view of the nurses and staff? We are trained to advocate for the wants of the resident and not to take no for an answer, but I can think of all sorts of situations where residents can ask for things which are very difficult. Are they looked at favorably by staff as another voice for the residents- or as a pain in the behind?
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    About germain

    Joined: Dec '03; Posts: 128; Likes: 4

    15 Comments

  3. by   steelcityrn
    From a nursing standpoint, if you were called in a facility where I worked, I would be glad to see you. It would probably mean a patients family member, or a patient themselves had a problem. I am sure there are some calls to you that will be stupid, or just being done in spite, I have seen a few patients who are just plain nutty and full of trouble. But, its a good thing if there is a real problem going on. What you should first do would be to hear out each side without forming any opinion. Pay attention to your surroundings, make sure if its about neglect that you check clothing, look in drawers. I have found urine soaked clothing. If its a feed problem, check weights on admission. Im not sure your a nurse, but there are signs of malnutrition that could be evident. If its a battery charge, look and document any marks, the locations of them are very important. Im not sure you would be able to actually see a patients chart, maybe someone else can tell you that. Good luck...its a very very important job you will do!!!









    We are trained to advocate for the wants of the resident and not to take no for an answer, but I can think of all sorts of situations where residents can ask for things which are very difficult. Are they looked at favorably by staff as another voice for the residents- or as a pain in the behind?[/QUOTE]
    Last edit by steelcityrn on Feb 23, '05
  4. by   donmomofnine
    I LIKE the ombudsman! They are there for my resident and I am there for my resident, so it's a win/win situation! I see them as a valuable resource, as a last resort.
  5. by   BadBird
    I don't know what a ombudsman is but it sounds interesting.
  6. by   germain
    I'm currently working on my pre reqs for nursing school and have been an aide for 11 years in various fields. I'm partly doing it because it will look great on my application, but a big part is to learn to advocate because it is something I believe so strongly in. I'm not called but assigned to a facility to interview residents and see if they have problems, and amplify their voice. The program works differently in every state, but staff can ask an omsbudsman to come in on behalf of a resident, if they know we don't work for the facility but for the resident. I'm sure I will learn a lot. I'm sure the complaints will vary from the serious to the impossible. Lack of staff is the biggest complaint- are you surprised?
  7. by   germain
    "Im not sure you would be able to actually see a patients chart,"

    We can if the patient or POA gives us permission.
  8. by   CapeCodMermaid
    THe ombusdman we have is viewed as a giant pain in the a**. She knows nothing about nursing, nothing about the regs and is always there to be annoying.
  9. by   germain
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    THe ombusdman we have is viewed as a giant pain in the a**. She knows nothing about nursing, nothing about the regs and is always there to be annoying.
    What does she do? Harrass staff, look for problems that aren't there, self serving trouble maker? I imagine that it can be like that.
  10. by   happthearts
    As I have said in other post the ombusdman can be your best friend when asking question about the law so they can keep you withen it . But if your Rehab or hospitial has any complaints .The ombusdman can be Your worse night mare.
    They time you how long it takes you to get to a light .If you have 5 that are ringing at the same time the ombusdman doesn't care how long it took you to tolet someone They just notice you have 4 other lights on .
    How soon meds were given after request .Sometime the Pt needs to wait because the last dose was too close.The ombusdman Talks and speak with all your Pt's about your care. Even when I was doing care the ombusdman walked right in. I told the lady ombusdman my Pt has the right to privacy when she is dressing and asked the ombusdman to leave .
    Then the ombusdman talks to the PT's to see if the food is good and hot enough.If there special diets are being met, If any complains they go and check all the temps in the kitchen.
    I don't have a problem with the ombusdman being there .I do have a problem if they are interfering with care time with the PT's time with me .I must have said 50 times that day excuse me I have to do care for my pt's be it incontance ,PT getting to the meal on time or bathing. I had a secudule in the past of what to do all day and then try to do it and try to follow it close because my PT's liked routine with there care.
  11. by   debRN0417
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    THe ombusdman we have is viewed as a giant pain in the a**. She knows nothing about nursing, nothing about the regs and is always there to be annoying.
    Ours is a ding-dong too!
  12. by   NurseFirst
    Quote from germain
    I'm training to become a volunteer omsbudsman/ resident advocate. I'm really exited about doing this, but wanted to know what the omsbudsman looked like from the point of view of the nurses and staff? We are trained to advocate for the wants of the resident and not to take no for an answer, but I can think of all sorts of situations where residents can ask for things which are very difficult. Are they looked at favorably by staff as another voice for the residents- or as a pain in the behind?
    I looked into becoming an Ombudsman, but the training times interfered with my nursing classes . The training in mediation (at least taught at my loc? my state?) is highly regarded and have seen it as pre-req to other jobs that might require mediation. (Although Ombudsman is, in our state, a volunteer position.)

    NurseFirst
  13. by   Marti Ann
    Quote from germain
    I'm training to become a volunteer omsbudsman/ resident advocate. I'm really exited about doing this, but wanted to know what the omsbudsman looked like from the point of view of the nurses and staff? We are trained to advocate for the wants of the resident and not to take no for an answer, but I can think of all sorts of situations where residents can ask for things which are very difficult. Are they looked at favorably by staff as another voice for the residents- or as a pain in the behind?

    What is an Ombudsman?
    An ombudsman is a specially trained and certified volunteer, who has been approved by the governor. He/she has been given authority under federal and state law to identify, investigate and resolve complaints made by, or on behalf of, long-term care facility residents. Ombudsmen respond to resident complaints and concerns ranging from lack of communication with staff to quality of care issues. It is the ombudsman?s job to protect the legal rights of residents, and assure that they receive appropriate treatment and quality care at the maximum extent possible.

    Ombudsmen typically volunteer approximately 20 hours per month to protect residents' rights. Each year, they advocate for thousands of long-term care facility residents in Florida, and have won numerous awards for their tireless dedication and exemplary work with the elder community.

    The program is comprised of 17 local councils, existing to serve residents in the most personal and effective way possible.

    People of many personal and professional backgrounds lend their strengths to the program. We are continuously seeking conscientious individuals who want to make a difference.

    I have been an ombusman for 8 years. It is my passion in life. I make a difference as a nurse but mostly as an ombudsman to so many resisdent in LTC.
    Any questions feel free to email me.


    Be an Ombudsman, one smile lasts a lifetime in your heart.
    "To the world you might be one person, but to one person you might be the world."
    Marti Ann Benenfeld, RN, FNC, ALA, LTC
    The Long Term Care Ombudsman Council
    North Miami Dade, FL
    Nurse Consultant, Long Term Care
    MartiAnnRN@aol.com or BestLittleNurse@aol.com
    Assisted Living Administrator: Core Trained
    Family Council Consultant
    Research and Development nurse



    Recognition Award 1998
    Achievement Award 1998
    Ombudsman of the Year: 2001
    Ombudsman Chairwoman: 2003 - 2005
    Governor's Golden Choice Award 2004
    Award of Excellence 2004


    Ombudsman 1997 to present




    ADVICE FOR THE DAY:


    Be nice to your kids. They will choose your nursing home one day!
  14. by   happytobehere96
    I live in FL. Could you lead me to a website on the ombudsmen process in FL.? Thanks






    Quote from Marti Ann
    What is an Ombudsman?
    An ombudsman is a specially trained and certified volunteer, who has been approved by the governor. He/she has been given authority under federal and state law to identify, investigate and resolve complaints made by, or on behalf of, long-term care facility residents. Ombudsmen respond to resident complaints and concerns ranging from lack of communication with staff to quality of care issues. It is the ombudsman?s job to protect the legal rights of residents, and assure that they receive appropriate treatment and quality care at the maximum extent possible.

    Ombudsmen typically volunteer approximately 20 hours per month to protect residents' rights. Each year, they advocate for thousands of long-term care facility residents in Florida, and have won numerous awards for their tireless dedication and exemplary work with the elder community.

    The program is comprised of 17 local councils, existing to serve residents in the most personal and effective way possible.

    People of many personal and professional backgrounds lend their strengths to the program. We are continuously seeking conscientious individuals who want to make a difference.

    I have been an ombusman for 8 years. It is my passion in life. I make a difference as a nurse but mostly as an ombudsman to so many resisdent in LTC.
    Any questions feel free to email me.


    Be an Ombudsman, one smile lasts a lifetime in your heart.
    "To the world you might be one person, but to one person you might be the world."
    Marti Ann Benenfeld, RN, FNC, ALA, LTC
    The Long Term Care Ombudsman Council
    North Miami Dade, FL
    Nurse Consultant, Long Term Care
    MartiAnnRN@aol.com or BestLittleNurse@aol.com
    Assisted Living Administrator: Core Trained
    Family Council Consultant
    Research and Development nurse



    Recognition Award 1998
    Achievement Award 1998
    Ombudsman of the Year: 2001
    Ombudsman Chairwoman: 2003 - 2005
    Governor's Golden Choice Award 2004
    Award of Excellence 2004


    Ombudsman 1997 to present




    ADVICE FOR THE DAY:


    Be nice to your kids. They will choose your nursing home one day!

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