Do employers look at new grad grades?

  1. I tried searching for this topic and the most recent one I found was 10 years ago, so I'm looking for some updated information. Just how important are you grades in nursing school? Our instructors always tell us, "C's get degrees", which very well may be true, but do C's get jobs is the bigger question. Do employers ask new grads for grades, GPA's, or transcripts? Would someone with a 3.8-4.0 in nursing school have an easier time getting a job in today's job market than someone with say a 3.0? I'm coming to the end of my second semester of six in an ABSN program and should hopefully keep my 4.0, but it causes me a lot of worry and stress as I'm always focusing or worried about school, grades, and finding a job.
    Last edit by WAboundSN on Dec 10
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    Joined: Dec '15; Posts: 197; Likes: 128

    20 Comments

  3. by   caliotter3
    There are employers who would use this info due to the nature of their offerings or due to the tremendous number of qualified applicants, but in general, no. A good hint might be if the info is even requested at all on the job application.
  4. by   MotoMonkey
    At least in my area, no one asks about grades when hiring new grads. We are even told that it is best to leave GPA off of our resumes. My best advice would be to always keep working towards the highest grade you are capable of, but don't drive yourself crazy thinking a "B" will keep you from getting hired as a new grad.
  5. by   vanGoghplaces
    It depends on the area of where you live. In my area, most new grad residencies require a min of 3.5 gpa to apply. It's an over saturated area so it's their way to weed people out.
  6. by   verene
    Some new grad residencies in saturated markets ask for a minimum GPA, and make take grades into account when ranking otherwise equal applicants. Aside from these highly competitive new grad jobs, most employers care more that you are licensed than the specific GPA you had in school.
  7. by   jtran21
    My school told me not to put my GPA on my resumé as it would give the employers an additional thing to compare between you and another applicant which can work against you. Honestly, I'm graduating in two days with a 3.4 gpa with a residency in the neuro ICU; you'll definitely be able to get a job if you have good interviewing skills.
  8. by   Miiki
    Mine did. Over 200 applicants for 10 spots in the NICU. Grades weren't the deciding factor, but it played a part to an extent. I didn't put my GPA on my resume, but they asked for it on the application.
  9. by   jtran21
    Quote from Miiki
    Mine did. Over 200 applicants for 10 spots in the NICU. Grades weren't the deciding factor, but it played a part to an extent. I didn't put my GPA on my resume, but they asked for it on the application.
    That's interesting, and I'm glad that they chose you!

    I'm sure that if they saw my gpa they wouldn't have hired me. I made sure that they knew why I was here why I wanted it and how I can improve their team, which is what the point of the interview is for cause grades don't determine how good of a nurse you'll be, OP.

    Although it could also be my hospice clinical experience and the cardstock I used for my resumé so who knows
  10. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Some of us view grades as a significant piece of information to help form a complete picture of a candidate; others do not. Some people, in fact, express a bias AGAINST people with excellent grades, the common refrain being that excellent grades somehow indicate that the person lacks "common sense" (whatever that means) or practical skills.

    As with most such questions, the answer is quite simply that it depends upon the person/people doing the screening, interviewing, and hiring decisions.

    Personally, grades are very significant to me and a good indicator of one's mastery of a subject, their intelligence, and their work habits.
  11. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Some of us view grades as a significant piece of information to help form a complete picture of a candidate; others do not. Some people, in fact, express a bias AGAINST people with excellent grades, the common refrain being that excellent grades somehow indicate that the person lacks "common sense" (whatever that means) or practical skills.

    As with most such questions, the answer is quite simply that it depends upon the person/people doing the screening, interviewing, and hiring decisions.

    Personally, grades are very significant to me and a good indicator of one's mastery of a subject, their intelligence, and their work habits.
  12. by   jtran21
    Quote from ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Some of us view grades as a significant piece of information to help form a complete picture of a candidate; others do not. Some people, in fact, express a bias AGAINST people with excellent grades, the common refrain being that excellent grades somehow indicate that the person lacks "common sense" (whatever that means) or practical skills.

    As with most such questions, the answer is quite simply that it depends upon the person/people doing the screening, interviewing, and hiring decisions.

    Personally, grades are very significant to me and a good indicator of one's mastery of a subject, their intelligence, and their work habits.
    That's a good point, and the bias against students who have great grades is uncalled for.

    However, depending on who the person is, they may be better demonstrating their knowledge in different ways other than taking an examination. For example, I was great at clinicals because I'm a tactile learner, but I struggled in examinations related to my (diagnosed) anxiety and testtaking skills.

    Unfortunately, some people are just better at taking tests than others, but I understand where you're coming from in considering grades as part of the hiring process.
  13. by   keshawn007
    I have been RN since 2006. Since then only one employer has asked for my GPA, and it was a place where they were having a "new grad training program".. I did not get the job, and I have moved on.
    I am now APRN, and I cannot complain. Life is great, and the salary is awesome!!!
    Like 200 K awesome annual this year!!!!
    Don't be afraid to walk away from low ball and bad offers. Just work as hard during your job search as you did during school.
    When I get in job hunt mode... I can apply to 100-200 positions in all the internet base search engine you know.. Linked-in, Glassdoor,....
    Good luck!!
    Last edit by keshawn007 on Dec 10
  14. by   Didi425
    Quote from keshawn007
    I have been RN since 2006. Since then only one employer has asked for my GPA, and it was a place where they were having a "new grad training program".. I did not get the job, and I have moved on.
    I am now APRN, and I cannot complain. Life is great, and the salary is awesome!!!
    Like 200 K awesome annual this year!!!!
    Don't be afraid to walk away from low ball and bad offers. Just work as hard during your job search as you did during school.
    When I get in job hunt mode... I can apply to 100-200 positions in all the internet base search engine you know.. Linked-in, Glassdoor,....
    Good luck!!
    Hi, can I ask which field you are in?

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