Pet Nurse?? - page 3

while i have answered several discussions over the years this is my first thread. my question involves the use of the term "nurse". i thought that the term was protected by law in most states. my... Read More

  1. by   Soup Turtle
    Quote from fuzzy

    veterinary technology is a young field when compared to nursing. like nurses, technicians have a problem with recognition, pay, and respect. while on the job trained people have their place in the animal hospital team, they should not be called "nurses" or veterinary technicians unless they have proper education and have sat and passed their state and national exams. i wonder how many nurses are trained on the job before they go to school.

    fuzzy




    i would venture to say that a lot of nurses are trained on the job. my understanding is that school prepares you for an entry level position where you're far from knowing everything. when you deal with people, you deal with red tape and lots of it. i don't doubt that an rn could be trained to be a wonderful rn without ever stepping into a classroom. the fact that you learned something sitting behind a desk doesn't make that knowledge superior. if you knew everything you know now and didn't learn it in a classroom, would you be any less capable or educated? the fact that one hasn't taken a test doesn't mean that one couldn't take it and pass with flying colors.

    our skilled, experienced techs get plenty of respect. i doubt that vet tech pay will ever equal rn pay for obvious reasons.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Long and heated thread about this very subject here:

    https://allnurses.com/forums/f8/vet-...ght=veterinary
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I have not changed my stance since answering those threads. I believe the term "nurse" should be protected and limited to those of us in NURSING of humans. Let vet techs stay just that: vet techs.

    And that is all I will say on this thread.
  5. by   hogan4736
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes

    And that is all I will say on this thread.

  6. by   tridil2000
    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    ANA that says it all....

    I could care less who calls themselves nurses...I know and the public is also smart enough to klnow who are people nurses. You do not get doctors getting their nose all out of shape when some calls themselves Dr Jim, you car doctor, or a company called Car Doctors. Now if some called himself a car nurse nurses would be foaming at the mouth. Lets look at important issues like who is going to win American Idol and how much do we hate Rob & Amber on the amazing race...

    see, i think this does matter. i think things like this contribute to OUR public image, and subsequently the shortage.

    medical doctors would not, and have not, stood for the same situation. a veterinarian is the title of an animal doctor. a long time ago doctors made the distinction quite clear.

    we should also insist that caregivers of animals have their own title just like medical docs did.
  7. by   Jules A
    These threads make me less than proud to be a "nurse". There are so many more important issues in this sad world that deserve attention.
  8. by   xokelly2
    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    ANA that says it all....

    I could care less who calls themselves nurses...I know and the public is also smart enough to klnow who are people nurses. You do not get doctors getting their nose all out of shape when some calls themselves Dr Jim, you car doctor, or a company called Car Doctors. Now if some called himself a car nurse nurses would be foaming at the mouth. Lets look at important issues like who is going to win American Idol and how much do we hate Rob & Amber on the amazing race...

    ...I really appriciate your closing statement!!!! So funny! Made me laugh while trying to stay awake at 5am......... thanks
  9. by   ABerryGirl
    I'm not sure yet how I feel on the term "PetNurse". I will tell you that a certified veterinary technician or someone who has been in the veterinary field for some time does have a great amount of knowledge. (That is, those that put some effort into learning.) As a vet tech they have the potential to do so much more than an A.S. or A.A. RN.
    For instance:
    - they take their own radiographs, that need to be good enough for the doctor to make a diagnosis. Taking a good radiograph takes skill, especially when the patient is not cooperative. (They don't send the patient to radiology or have radiology come up to the room.)
    - they draw their own blood and place their own catheters. (Keep in mind that the animal may be in constant motion while doing this, and trying to bite them.) They don't have a phlebotomist that they can call to do it for them.
    - an experienced vet tech can place an NG tube or nasal cannulas. Which in animals need to be inserted into the nose sometimes 4-5 inches and then sutured in. Again, all while the animal is moving and trying to bite.
    - many vet techs can make a read their own blood smear. Doing a full differential and cell blood count. (How many nurses do you know who can do this?)
    - they also look at various other specimens under the microscope.... urine, feces, ear debris or pus from an abscess. They have the responsibility to guide the doctor in finding a diagnosis with these samples. Nurses send EVERYTHING to the lab.
    - depending on which hospital a vet tech works at, they may need to know the anatomy and physiology of various species. You wouldn't treat a bird or reptile the same as a cat or dog. RN's only have one species to work with, humans.

    I could go on and on about this. The point is, some veterinary techs are VERY knowledgeable and competent... while yes, others may not be.
  10. by   Fuzzy
    Quote from ABerryGirl
    I'm not sure yet how I feel on the term "PetNurse". I will tell you that a certified veterinary technician or someone who has been in the veterinary field for some time does have a great amount of knowledge. (That is, those that put some effort into learning.) As a vet tech they have the potential to do so much more than an A.S. or A.A. RN.
    For instance:
    - they take their own radiographs, that need to be good enough for the doctor to make a diagnosis. Taking a good radiograph takes skill, especially when the patient is not cooperative. (They don't send the patient to radiology or have radiology come up to the room.)
    - they draw their own blood and place their own catheters. (Keep in mind that the animal may be in constant motion while doing this, and trying to bite them.) They don't have a phlebotomist that they can call to do it for them.
    - an experienced vet tech can place an NG tube or nasal cannulas. Which in animals need to be inserted into the nose sometimes 4-5 inches and then sutured in. Again, all while the animal is moving and trying to bite.
    - many vet techs can make a read their own blood smear. Doing a full differential and cell blood count. (How many nurses do you know who can do this?)
    - they also look at various other specimens under the microscope.... urine, feces, ear debris or pus from an abscess. They have the responsibility to guide the doctor in finding a diagnosis with these samples. Nurses send EVERYTHING to the lab.
    - depending on which hospital a vet tech works at, they may need to know the anatomy and physiology of various species. You wouldn't treat a bird or reptile the same as a cat or dog. RN's only have one species to work with, humans.

    I could go on and on about this. The point is, some veterinary techs are VERY knowledgeable and competent... while yes, others may not be.
    Thanks A Berry Girl. This is why I'm defensive about my job title just like many nurses. Granted having a diploma and passing the state and national boards dosn't necessarily make one a good veterinary technician but it does PROVE that they have enough general knowledge to hopefully do the job safely without risking the life of the patient. Does this sound familar to you nurses? People who are trained on the job without any formal education are not bad, in fact they are an important part of the team, BUT they are not veterinary technicians either but veterinary assistants. There are states now that are writing veterinary technician terminalogy into their practice acts to protect the title which is similar to what the nursing industry had done many years ago.
    What bother's me is that a large corparation gets away from this by hiring people with little or no education and calling them a "nurse". The term nurse to me has always ment that the person has attended nursing school and has learned some skills before going out into the real world instead of "practicing on the patients" in a real life setting. To me this is deceiving the public. I'm sure that their name tags don't say "PetNurse In Training" or "Student PetNurse" but just "PetNurse". From reading other threads, I thought that the response would be different as nurses always seemed to be very protective of their nurse title. But again that was 2002-03. Times change.

    Fuzzy, CVT who will always be a veterinary technician.
  11. by   Jules A
    [quote=Fuzzy;2088912]What bother's me is that a large corparation gets away from this by hiring people with little or no education and calling them a "nurse".

    say "PetNurse In Training" or "Student PetNurse" but just "PetNurse". From reading other threads, I thought that the response would be different as nurses always seemed to be very protective of their nurse title. But again that was 2002-03. Times change./quote]



    Sheesh, I knew this was where you were headed. So basically you came here with the intention of getting our knickers in a twist so that nurses would cause a fuss and hassle the Corporation that hires vet assistants rather than vet techs under the guise that they are calling them Petnurse. Touche.

    As per my posts I have a huge respect for the work Veterinary Technicians do and the fact that their education is so similar to ours. I would love to see you called Vet Nurses. However, the big problem lies in the lack of unity among RVTs and CVTs. My state doesn't even have a local NAVTA group so that speaks volumes to me. If your profession wants recognition (and the pay you deserve) you will have to band together, do a little leg work and get legislation passed so that Vets are required to hire licensed personel. This thread is a decent example of that, apparently you won't even contact the company and voice your concerns instead you came here for us to do it.
  12. by   Cattitude
    Quote from jules a
    [


    sheesh, i knew this was where you were headed. so basically you came here with the intention of getting our knickers in a twist so that nurses would cause a fuss and hassle the corporation that hires vet assistants rather than vet techs under the guise that they are calling them petnurse. touche.
    and
    this thread is a decent example of that, apparently you won't even contact the company and voice your concerns instead you came here for us to do it.
    i agree jules. i too have a lot of respect for vet techs. love my pets and want to keep them healthy and cared for by well trained/educated people.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]i also have participated in threads/discussions regarding the use of the term"nurse" by a person who is not.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]however, i feel this is not our fight. if the vet techs want to go for it, so be it. i am not offended by the use of the term "pet nurse" whatsoever. it doesn't take anything away from my profession. i would feel ridiculous asking this co. to stop using the term nurse.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]as someone esle said, more important stuff to do.. jmo.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    In my opinion, if the vet 'nurse' has been educated to advocate, medicate, comfort and include most of the skills that are being performed for humans, but are done for animals instead, then, I see no reason why the word 'nurse' should not be included in their title. LPNs and RNs are nurses, but there the "LP" stands for "licensed practical" and "R" means "registered"...letting us know that there are different functions under that word "nurse". If they place the word "animal" or even "pet", then, it may be self explanatory what domain this person nurses over. For what it is worth, as an licensed practical NURSE, I have been told by others that I'm not a nurse, either...lol

    There ARE bigger fishes to fry than this...it ain't that serious
    Last edit by pagandeva2000 on Feb 28, '07

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