Do most nurses not want to go into management? - page 2

It seems to me that if a nurse wanted to move up into management/director positions one could do so rather easily and quickly since most nurses do not want to do that. What is your opinion on this?... Read More

  1. by   elkpark
    In addition to the reasons already noted, there's the "sacrificial lamb" aspect of frontline and midline management positions -- many years ago, early in my career, I worked on a high security/acuity adolescent psych inpt unit that had serious problems related to the physical plant (the actual building we were in) and policies put in place by upper management. Upper management was unwilling to make any changes to fix the problems with the building (gee, that would cost MONEY!!) or their unreasonable and unnecessary policies -- instead, they would come in every six months or so, look around, see the problems were still there, and fire the NM of the unit because she had been unsuccessful in fixing the problems. I had, like, four nurse managers in 18 months or so that I worked on the unit ... What amazed me was that, even though all the other staff nurses were watching the same little psychodrama I was (the repeated blaming & firing of the NM), other staff nurses kept being willing to step up and take a crack at the NM job -- apparently, they weren't drawing the same conclusions I was.
  2. by   llg
    Count me with the other people who responded that they would not want to go into management ... for all the reasons stated in the previous posts. That's why I chose to advance my career by focusing on CNS work, staff development, evidence-based practice, research, and education. I get the benefits of better scheduling, higher pay, etc. without having to go over totally to the Dark Side.
  3. by   General E. Speaking, RN
    I recently took the Nurse Educator position on my floor. Hourly supplemental position. I still do floor nursing and relief charge. The position has put me in the middle of Administration and floor nursing. I have been introducing new policies that require more paperwork, etc...

    It is hard. I understand both sides. The policies are necessary, however, I can understand the gripes about the ever increasing work load that translates to more paperwork.
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    It is interesting how management is being described as the "Dark Side". I understand each reason for thinking so. After awhile, it gets to the point where you can compare it to committing your first murder...you get more comfortable with it as time goes by. Not for me.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    It is interesting how management is being described as the "Dark Side". I understand each reason for thinking so. After awhile, it gets to the point where you can compare it to committing your first murder...you get more comfortable with it as time goes by. Not for me.

    You made me laugh.


    steph
  6. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I could be wrong, but I believe most nurses don't want to bother is because they have to 'cross to the other side' and perpetuate the unfair practices and policies that exist and support them, even though they may personally think they are insane. What appears to happen, also, is that most of those positions are non-union.

    For nurses, such as myself that do benefit from union membership, that gets dicey. Most managers I know do not get paid overtime, so, if they have to stay late or come early, do weekends, etc, they do not see any compensation. In addition, they have to operate on survival mode, which means, as I mentioned earlier, support things that screw us or they will get fired. I am only saying these things from my own personal observations; you may get more as others answer this thread. It seems to me that those who go into management don't stay long, transfer around quite a bit and alot of it may not be voluntary. Not worth it to me.
    (sits in front of computer, nodding head so hard it is about to fall off)

    BTDT, got the battle scars to prove it..........What's funny is, now that I'm no longer IN management, I keep running into people with whom I used to be friends, and I can see now how grey-faced and tired they all appear. I must have been the same way, for they remark on how healthy I look nowadays, how much weight I've lost, or how relaxed I seem to be; and as we go our separate ways I thank God again for giving me the sense to get OUT of management when I did. Charge nursing is all the management I can handle, and some days even that is more than I want to do!
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    I knew it was only a matter of time before you showed up Marla. This thread is right up your alley.

    I do not want to go into management either because is takes you away from the patient. I like being my patient's advocate.

    I hate paperwork, meetings, bureaucracy.

    steph
  8. by   llg
    I like to think that managers/administrators can maintain the ideals of the nursing profession rather than convert to the goals of the finance people .... and I have known many wonderful people who have been nursing managers/administrators.

    However, all of the ones I have really respected have eventually left the admin world eventually, saying how happy they are to be out of it. The others become people I no longer respect.
  9. by   marilynmom
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    It is interesting how management is being described as the "Dark Side". I understand each reason for thinking so. After awhile, it gets to the point where you can compare it to committing your first murder...you get more comfortable with it as time goes by. Not for me.
    LOL!
  10. by   marilynmom
    I think you have to be a certain "type" to go into admin. There was only 1 girl in my BSN classes that wanted to get into admin/management.

    It is NOT for me. I didn't get my BSN to get into admin/management, but teaching, research, NP, etc.

    I do relief charge and that is more than enough dealing with management for me.
  11. by   sissiesmama
    Tweety - I'm definetly like you. Give me my how ever many patients and I'm a happy camper. I charge when I get elected, but I don't relish the job.

    Dh has been an RN since 1987, and after the first 3 years, he has always been in management, either nurse manager or nursing supervisor. He kicks butt as a sup, but when he gets home in the evening, it shows on his face how crappy the day was. Especially now with the changes in health care, some days he is the only house sup at 2 different facilities.

    Between SF downtown, as it's known now, and SF North, he runs both hospitals during the week. The excuse is that the managers are inhouse (supposedly) and "could help out", but don't. Between the two facilities, they have approx 900 beds, and it just never stops(like it does anywhere else?) If he takes a minute to call to check on me, if we are on the phone 10 minutes, he gets an average of 6 calls and 4 or 5 pages. Good luck going to the BR!

    Anne, RNC
  12. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from llg

    However, all of the ones I have really respected have eventually left the admin world eventually, saying how happy they are to be out of it. The others become people I no longer respect.
    See, that's just it. I left because I had become someone I no longer respected..........and if I couldn't respect myself, how in the name of all that is reasonable could I expect anyone else to respect me??

    No, no.........'tis far better to be a lowly peon getting NH admissions at 2130 even though it's impossible to get decent admitting orders or clarifications at that hour, than it is to be one of the bean counters so worried about the bottom line that they have to accept any and all patients, at any hour of the day, in any condition.

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