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For those planning to get or have gotten an ASN..

Students   (776 Views | 9 Replies)

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Do you plan to start working toward your BSN after graduating or will you work as a nurse for the time being and get it a bit more down the road?

I'm asking this as I finish my final semester of nursing school. I'm very conflicted right now and would like to hear others opinions or experiences with this. Thank you!

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1 Follower; 137 Posts; 1,353 Profile Views

I'm in my last semester of my ADN program, but my school offered a dual-enrollment option so I've also been taking classes that count toward my BSN. I'm sure it depends on your area and the job market, but I've found when I was interviewing a lot of hospitals were requiring enrollment in a BSN program within six months to a year of your hire date.

If it's any consolation- the BSN program has been a serious breeze compared to the ADN. There's just some papers to write and a handful of PowerPoint based projects (I'm enrolled in Frostburg's RN-to-BSN; all online).

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NurseKat has 7 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case Management/Utilization Management.

3 Posts; 381 Profile Views

I waited about 6 months after finishing my ADN program and working a little while before I started my online BSN. I agree with the above comment that although it's not easy, it's much more chill than the actual nursing program. You won't regret taking at least a small break from school after you graduate. It's difficult to learn a new job at the same time you start a new degree.

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Nature_walker has 4 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in psych.

211 Posts; 4,355 Profile Views

I had to work for my hospital for a year full time before I qualified for the tuition benefits. I did that so that I wouldn't have to pay so much for school and then I could avoid loans.

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27 Posts; 259 Profile Views

I'm in my second term of an ADN program right now, and am planning on going on to a BSN program the next term after I finish my associates degree. My reasoning is that the jobs I am interested in do not hire nurses who have an ADN, and, I'm a non-traditional student, so I need to get my career on track. My hope is to do well academically in both the ADN and BSN programs so I can get a residency in an area that I'd like to work in. Also, my husband has a good job, so I am not in a hurry to work as soon as I have a license. Personal finances definitely factor into a lot of people's decisions about weather or how to continue on with a BSN.

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Vix is a CNA and specializes in Geriatrics.

6 Posts; 68 Profile Views

I'm currently a 2/4th level ASN student, heading into my 3rd level. My school allows us to take the BSN bridge courses that are non-clinical along with our ASN if we make it to 3rd or 4th level ASN, so I am working on both degrees at the same time. I've taken all co-reqs required, and will be starting my first RN-to-BSN course in the Fall of this year. I've managed to keep my grades up so far, but my school definitely understands if I get overwhelmed and is willing to pause my RN-BSN progression if need be. I rather go ahead and get them done within a similar time frame, however. If everything goes according to plan, I'll graduate with my ASN in May '21, and my BSN in Dec '21.

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29 Posts; 83 Profile Views

I plan on working once I finish my ASN. But I also plan on going directly for my BSN. The school I'm in has a transfer program with another school that offers the BSN and they give a size-able tuition break if you go that route. 

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SnipRN has 1 years experience and specializes in Dialysis.

14 Posts; 193 Profile Views

I graduated in June last year, started working full time as a nurse immediately after graduation, and signed up for BSN courses in August. It was hard.. but worth it in my opinion. I'm down to only 2 classes left to finish my BSN this Summer. Personally, I think it is easier if you go early, to stay in that 'student' frame of mind. You should already be used to handling the assignment workload, writing papers, etc.  I would think it would be difficult to get back into the swing of things once you've taken a year (or more) off from school.

You have to be able to manage your time well though, and consider your work schedule when deciding how many classes to take. Online school is a LOT of written assignments. It's very time consuming. After working a 12-14 hour shift, I just physically (and mentally) cannot get any homework done... so my days off are entirely dedicated to homework. That part of it kind of sucks. 🤷‍♀️

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,447 Posts; 33,507 Profile Views

On 4/20/2020 at 10:21 AM, Lovelylifestlye said:

Do you plan to start working toward your BSN after graduating or will you work as a nurse for the time being and get it a bit more down the road?

I'm asking this as I finish my final semester of nursing school. I'm very conflicted right now and would like to hear others opinions or experiences with this. Thank you!

I finished my ASN ten years ago and am unlikely to continue on for several reasons. I graduated in an employee's market, I'm happy working in non-competitive specialties, I have no desire to manage anything, I'm not young, and I have young children that I'd like to enjoy being home with as much as possible.

In fact, I planed to be an LPN, but the wait list was so long that I "took a few RN prerequisites" and ended up accepted into a competitive entry RN program faster.

I think anybody young should go for their BSN as soon as possible. For those of us who are a little bit older, it may or may not be worth it.

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21 Posts; 128 Profile Views

I just recently graduated from my ASN program. I am obviously not going to get hired anywhere anytime soon so I figured why not start my BSN courses while I'm just sitting around waiting. 

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