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FNP jobs with RN schedule: 3-12 hours shifts

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Specializes in ICU, Triage, Home Health, soon-to-be FNP. Has 16 years experience.

Other than hospital or inpatient, where else can I find an FNP job that has the 3-12 hour shift schedule? I don't mind working every other weekends. Thanks

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care. Has 3 years experience.

That's going to be very hard to find. That is not the nature of primary care or outpatient care. The best you're going to get is 4-10s. Why on earth did you become an FNP if you don't want to work normal FNP hours?

RNFANP, BSN, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in OR/NP/RNFA. Has 8 years experience.

Maybe minute clinics/urgent care?

jensfbay, BSN

Specializes in ICU, Triage, Home Health, soon-to-be FNP. Has 16 years experience.

15 hours ago, RNFANP said:

Maybe minute clinics/urgent care?

thank you. I think I'll need primary care experience first to work Urgent care, right?

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care. Has 3 years experience.

2 hours ago, jensfbay said:

thank you. I think I'll need primary care experience first to work Urgent care, right?

Very, very few minute clinics or urgent care clinics will hire a new grad NP. Almost all require a minimum of 1 year, most require a minimum of 2 years experience.

ThePrincessBride, BSN

Specializes in Med-Surg, NICU. Has 6 years experience.

Hey OP,

I too have no desire to work Monday through Friday. Corrections, Urgent Cares and even some school districts do a few days per week.

5 minutes ago, FullGlass said:

Very, very few minute clinics or urgent care clinics will hire a new grad NP. Almost all require a minimum of 1 year, most require a minimum of 2 years experience.

CVS hires them like crazy and they are huge.

jensfbay, BSN

Specializes in ICU, Triage, Home Health, soon-to-be FNP. Has 16 years experience.

I'm glad I'm not the only one. Yeah, I think corrections is a great idea. Thanks!

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care. Has 3 years experience.

1 hour ago, ThePrincessBride said:

Hey OP,

I too have no desire to work Monday through Friday. Corrections, Urgent Cares and even some school districts do a few days per week.

CVS hires them like crazy and they are huge.

CVS requires 1-2 years of NP experience

ThePrincessBride, BSN

Specializes in Med-Surg, NICU. Has 6 years experience.

9 minutes ago, FullGlass said:

CVS requires 1-2 years of NP experience

Nope. I have plenty of NP friends who started as new grads

Edited by ThePrincessBride

jensfbay, BSN

Specializes in ICU, Triage, Home Health, soon-to-be FNP. Has 16 years experience.

new grads in UC? WOW!! did they get any training prior to starting there?

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care. Has 3 years experience.

1 hour ago, ThePrincessBride said:

Nope. I have plenty of NP friends who started as new grads

The reason CVS, at least in California, does not hire new grads is because the NP usually works alone in these Minute Clinics. I find the thought of a new grad in such a role to be truly alarming and a very irresponsible hire. A new grad NP would be OK in an Urgent Care where other providers are present.

Aside from care quality, a new grad that puts themself in this position is just asking for a boatload of stress and is also creating a huge liability for themselves (working as sole provider in an UC)

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine. Has 8 years experience.

4 hours ago, jensfbay said:

new grads in UC? WOW! did they get any training prior to starting there?

In Michigan, new grad FNPs are hired in UC all the time straight from school with 3 months orientation. It is "dependent" state, so M.D. provider must be there on regular basis to sign charts. Many students, knowing that their chances to get first job in UC are pretty high, try to arrange as much clinical time as possible in this enviroinment.

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care. Has 3 years experience.

17 minutes ago, KatieMI said:

In Michigan, new grad FNPs are hired in UC all the time straight from school with 3 months orientation. It is "dependent" state, so M.D. provider must be there on regular basis to sign charts. Many students, knowing that their chances to get first job in UC are pretty high, try to arrange as much clinical time as possible in this enviroinment.

In California, that is not the case. I was offered a UC job as a new grad, but this was a large UC, part of a hospital, that had multiple providers on all shifts.

Even in remote rural areas, which are desperate for providers, I was told they absolutely would not hire a new grad for primary care or UC if they were going to be the only provider on site. I ended up in a rural clinic, but one that had 6 providers every day.

My favorite clinical rotation in school was UC, and that UC was trying to hire someone. My preceptor said I did a great job, but she was not going to hire a new grad for the role. She tried that once and she said never again, and that UC had 2-3 providers every day.

Maybe I'm a lot dumber than other NPs on this forum, but when I graduated, I was very anxious and felt like I knew nothing. I was running to my MD and NP mentors multiple times a day. That tapered off, of course, but I have no idea how any new grad NP thinks they are going to be competent to be the sole provider in a UC or primary care clinic.

New grad NPs should be very careful to choose a first job that will provide them with ample support and mentoring. Training is fine, but that is no substitute for the real thing. It took me 6 to 9 months to feel more comfortable and it was 1 year before I started to feel confident inside as an NP. The goal should be to provide the safest, highest quality care to patients.

sleepwalker, MSN, NP

Specializes in Occupational Health. Has 17 years experience.

On 5/25/2020 at 8:31 PM, FullGlass said:

New grad NPs should be very careful to choose a first job that will provide them with ample support and mentoring. Training is fine, but that is no substitute for the real thing. It took me 6 to 9 months to feel more comfortable and it was 1 year before I started to feel confident inside as an NP. The goal should be to provide the safest, highest quality care to patients.

Ain't it the truth...I remember when I first started I would feel really good and "confident" about my diagnosis and treatment but often turnaround to one of the more experienced providers and "double-check"😀. Now, years later, it's more "it is what it is because I say it is...and that's good enough"...LOL

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

On 5/25/2020 at 12:46 PM, ThePrincessBride said:

Nope. I have plenty of NP friends who started as new grads

That sounds like a recipe for disaster....

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

On 5/25/2020 at 5:31 PM, FullGlass said:

In California, that is not the case. I was offered a UC job as a new grad, but this was a large UC, part of a hospital, that had multiple providers on all shifts.

Even in remote rural areas, which are desperate for providers, I was told they absolutely would not hire a new grad for primary care or UC if they were going to be the only provider on site. I ended up in a rural clinic, but one that had 6 providers every day.

My favorite clinical rotation in school was UC, and that UC was trying to hire someone. My preceptor said I did a great job, but she was not going to hire a new grad for the role. She tried that once and she said never again, and that UC had 2-3 providers every day.

Maybe I'm a lot dumber than other NPs on this forum, but when I graduated, I was very anxious and felt like I knew nothing. I was running to my MD and NP mentors multiple times a day. That tapered off, of course, but I have no idea how any new grad NP thinks they are going to be competent to be the sole provider in a UC or primary care clinic.

New grad NPs should be very careful to choose a first job that will provide them with ample support and mentoring. Training is fine, but that is no substitute for the real thing. It took me 6 to 9 months to feel more comfortable and it was 1 year before I started to feel confident inside as an NP. The goal should be to provide the safest, highest quality care to patients.

Overconfidence. People don't know what they don't know. Thinking 600 clinical hours and a 1-2 years as a med surg medication passer will prep them to independently assess and properly diagnosis patients is the definition of insanity.

ThePrincessBride, BSN

Specializes in Med-Surg, NICU. Has 6 years experience.

20 hours ago, Numenor said:

That sounds like a recipe for disaster....

Not really. Retail clinics usually have very strict protocols and a narrow amount of conditions they can treat.

ThePrincessBride, BSN

Specializes in Med-Surg, NICU. Has 6 years experience.

On 5/25/2020 at 5:13 PM, FullGlass said:

The reason CVS, at least in California, does not hire new grads is because the NP usually works alone in these Minute Clinics. I find the thought of a new grad in such a role to be truly alarming and a very irresponsible hire. A new grad NP would be OK in an Urgent Care where other providers are present.

Aside from care quality, a new grad that puts themself in this position is just asking for a boatload of stress and is also creating a huge liability for themselves (working as sole provider in an UC)

I agree that they shouldn't work as a sole provider in an UC. From what some of the NPs I know have told me, they are usually alone but help from multiple sources is just a quick phone call away.