Fired From First NP Job: Struggling Emotionally

Updated | Posted
by CH_NP CH_NP (New) New

You are reading page 3 of Fired From First NP Job: Struggling Emotionally. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

HP Nelson CPC CPCO CCS

Specializes in Medical coding and documentation improvement. 5 Posts

On 8/11/2022 at 5:31 PM, CH_NP said:

I actually worked at CVS as a nurse reviewer working from home for 6 months and did not want to leave the job because I just started there and I am more the type of person who likes to stay in the company longer.  But because I wanted to work as an NP and I do not want to slip the opportunity I took the chance and accepted this NP job. Never did I realize I will be fired this quick. It was indeed a tough decision because I love the company and learned to love the job. Despite the fact that it is a different role, I don't know if CVS will still hire someone who just resigned, although I left on good terms with the company. 

Try anyway! You'll save them a ton of money by not needing to be retrained!

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 11 years experience. 3 Articles; 5,579 Posts

2 hours ago, CH_NP said:

Hi nitenurse,

I can't deny that I am actually struggling with imposter syndrome. I graduated 2 years ago and it feels like I did not get adequate hands-on training. There were times I resorted to doing virtual clinicals during the peak of the pandemic. I also had a medical condition that prevented me from working and pursuing NP after graduation. I am interested in shadowing other providers while working as an RN. How does that work though? I thought you can only do that when you are employed.  

I know this wasn’t to be but I’m going to respond; forgive me. 
I think most novice providers (NPs, PAs, MD/DOs) have some degree of imposter syndrome. This isn’t a bad thing. It keeps us in check. You are always better off underestimating your skills vs overestimating. Don’t feel bad about that. 
 

Don’t take this the wrong way (because it is not your fault) but “virtual clinicals” is a joke. It shouldn’t be counted towards what are already a staggering low amount of required hours. A huge failure of advanced nursing education. IMHO they should give you your money back because they set you up to struggle. 
 

It really sounds like you could use a mentor: a local experienced NP that you can talk to, shadow, and would help guide you as you look for the right fit. Normally mentors are organically established during your clinical rotations but your program failed you on that front. 

CH_NP

CH_NP

12 Posts

10 minutes ago, BostonFNP said:

I know this wasn’t to be but I’m going to respond; forgive me. 
I think most novice providers (NPs, PAs, MD/DOs) have some degree of imposter syndrome. This isn’t a bad thing. It keeps us in check. You are always better off underestimating your skills vs overestimating. Don’t feel bad about that. 
 

Don’t take this the wrong way (because it is not your fault) but “virtual clinicals” is a joke. It shouldn’t be counted towards what are already a staggering low amount of required hours. A huge failure of advanced nursing education. IMHO they should give you your money back because they set you up to struggle. 
 

It really sounds like you could use a mentor: a local experienced NP that you can talk to, shadow, and would help guide you as you look for the right fit. Normally mentors are organically established during your clinical rotations but your program failed you on that front. 

I concur. NP education should be more rigorous and should require more hours. Unfortunately, it was also tough looking for a different clinical placement when COVID started since some clinics did not want to have students.

You are correct, I definitely need a mentor. I am even thinking of paying a mentor so I can just have one. Do you know anyone? 

 

Numenor

Specializes in rounding on the floors probably. Has 10 years experience. 555 Posts

11 hours ago, CH_NP said:

Hi nitenurse,

I can't deny that I am actually struggling with imposter syndrome. I graduated 2 years ago and it feels like I did not get adequate hands-on training. There were times I resorted to doing virtual clinicals during the peak of the pandemic. I also had a medical condition that prevented me from working and pursuing NP after graduation. I am interested in shadowing other providers while working as an RN. How does that work though? I thought you can only do that when you are employed.  

This is the standard for my health system now.

nitenurse

nitenurse

65 Posts

21 hours ago, CH_NP said:

Hi nitenurse,

I can't deny that I am actually struggling with imposter syndrome. I graduated 2 years ago and it feels like I did not get adequate hands-on training. There were times I resorted to doing virtual clinicals during the peak of the pandemic. I also had a medical condition that prevented me from working and pursuing NP after graduation. I am interested in shadowing other providers while working as an RN. How does that work though? I thought you can only do that when you are employed.  

o.k I am a bit unclear as to your current employment status; are you working as an RN now? If so, then ask one of the providers if they don't mind having a shadow on (insert day off here) for 2 or 4 hours. Of course its up to the physician, however, if you are a bit squeamish with approaching one that you may not know all too well, you can also shadow another NP (maybe someone from your class, if you still have any contact) if that avenue is easier to navigate.  If you are not employed, then the process is the same, however, it may take a bit longer to execute. Either way, you have a plan to move forward and no one will care if you are employed or not as long as you have an active license -this is for you, not them 🙂 

CH_NP

CH_NP

12 Posts

25 minutes ago, nitenurse said:

o.k I am a bit unclear as to your current employment status; are you working as an RN now? If so, then ask one of the providers if they don't mind having a shadow on (insert day off here) for 2 or 4 hours. Of course its up to the physician, however, if you are a bit squeamish with approaching one that you may not know all too well, you can also shadow another NP (maybe someone from your class, if you still have any contact) if that avenue is easier to navigate.  If you are not employed, then the process is the same, however, it may take a bit longer to execute. Either way, you have a plan to move forward and no one will care if you are employed or not as long as you have an active license -this is for you, not them 🙂 

Hi, I am not currently employed but I am planning to work as an RN for now. 
I see. Thanks for the advise. 

Mergirlc, RN

628 Posts

3 hours ago, CH_NP said:

Hi, I am not currently employed but I am planning to work as an RN for now. 
I see. Thanks for the advise. 

I'm very sorry about losing your first job.  I know it probably doesn't feel great right now, but don't let it throw your FNP plans away.

I wanted to add, don't let working as a RN sidetrack you on your road to working as a FNP.  The longer you wait, the harder it may become to not only get a job as a FNP, but to also remain motivated.  I know you already mentioned you waited a bit after graduation to pursue employment due to personal issues.  This has already put a bit of a damper on the FNP track.  

I know you already mentioned working for CVS before.  Did you make any FNP contacts during your time there?  Any way you can go back to work as a RN working inside a Minute Clinic location?  This way you would be working alongside a FNP since they are the ones who are normally employed there.  This might open the door to make some contacts there to see if they can help you out.  I only suggest this route since it sounds as if you're looking for a mentor, which is a great idea.  

Somebody else suggested to contact former classmates.  I think this is the best idea by far, if you still have their emails/phone numbers!

Edited by Mergirlc
extra words

CH_NP

CH_NP

12 Posts

10 minutes ago, Mergirlc said:

I'm very sorry about losing your first job.  I know it probably doesn't feel great right now, but don't let it throw your FNP plans away.

I wanted to add, don't let working as a RN sidetrack you on your road to working as a FNP.  The longer you wait, the harder it may become to not only get a job as a FNP, but to also remain motivated.  I know you already mentioned you waited a bit after graduation to pursue employment due to personal issues.  This has already put a bit of a damper on the FNP track.  

I know you already mentioned working for CVS before.  Did you make any FNP contacts during your time there?  Any way you can go back to work as a RN working inside a Minute Clinic location?  This way you would be working alongside a FNP since they are the ones who are normally employed there.  This might open the door to make some contacts there to see if they can help you out.  I only suggest this route since it sounds as if you're looking for a mentor, which is a great idea.  

Somebody else suggested to contact former classmates.  I think this is the best idea by far, if you still have their emails/phone numbers!

Hi,

No. I only worked at CVs Health for 6 months. It's a work from home type of job and I’ve worked as a nurse reviewer. I did not have any contacts in minute clinic since I really never met anyone in person. 

Papersoup

Papersoup

1 Post

I understand you may feel discouraged but don't even think of giving up. When I first came out of school I volunteered at a free/ reduced priced clinic it gave me exposure and alot of the times you will have other volunteer providers there to bounce ideas off of. Check in your area for places that need volunteer nps. Maybe you could look into fellowships around the U.S.. Or ask an Md to shadow them at a local office . that way you can look at the thought process even if you don't get to physically touch the pt because you would probably need insurance for that. Keep trying, don't give up hope. This is just the beginning for you and a story that will help you to help someone else 

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in New Critical care NP, Critical care, Med-surg, LTC. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 2,290 Posts

I am late in responding, but so sorry to hear about your frustrating experience. I think that in almost any career, proper orientation and support is the key to finding success in a role. When I was interviewing for my current position, almost all of my questions were around the orientation process and expectations. I knew that they had successfully oriented many new NPs to the role and felt there was going to be adequate support when I was on my own. Of course staffing changes disrupted much of that, but I had enough of an orientation to get a solid base and I'm fortunate to have understanding coworkers as resources since I've been on my own. 

I've been fired before and I know what a hit it can be. You can start questioning yourself and your abilities beyond what really is necessary to question. You got through school, you passed your clinicals and board exam (even if the clinicals weren't what you would have wanted). Does it automatically mean you'll be successful? No, but it's an indicator that you have the tools for success. You have to pick yourself up, don't let it rock you entirely, know that you'll find a successful situation. Good luck!