Fired From First NP Job: Struggling Emotionally

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by CH_NP CH_NP (New) New

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I was let go today from my 1st NP job after working there for 10 days. I was told I wasn't a good fit and I needed more training. It is ironic that they have so many students in the clinic yet they won't spend enough time training me. I feel defeated and I am struggling emotionally. I was told they like me and I can get in touch with them when I am more equipped and have gained more experience. I was upfront with them that this is my first NP job. They should have not hired me if they will just let me go this quick. If only I would get fired I should have not resigned from my previous RN job. I don't know what to do. I don't know anymore if NP is for me or if should I just go back to working as an RN. Any advice? 

Freckledkorican, MSN, APRN

Specializes in MSN, FNP-BC. 84 Posts

I am sorry to hear about your experience☹️. I am a newbie NP myself (graduated August 2021) and dipping my toes in the provider pool by gaining experience through a year long primary care residency starting next month. I have to move for it and leaving my husband behind to battle it out with our soon-to-be 13 yo, but it is totally worth it in my eyes. There is no way I would be prepared to navigate on my own as a provider; I am well acquainted with my limitations.

Is that something you would be interested in doing? I don't know your situation, but if I didn't get accepted into the one in my state, I was going to apply to one in NC and one in VA. I'll leave the links just in case for you or for anyone else who'd like the information.

https://atriumhealth.org/education/center-for-advanced-practice/fellowships

https://www.carilionclinic.org/fellowships/np_pa#programs

CH_NP

CH_NP

12 Posts

seems like a good idea and thank you for the suggestion.. However, I have a baby and a 4 y/o and I don't think this will work for my family 😞 

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 11 years experience. 3 Articles; 5,570 Posts

18 hours ago, CH_NP said:

I was let go today from my 1st NP job after working there for 10 days. I was told I wasn't a good fit and I needed more training. It is ironic that they have so many students in the clinic yet they won't spend enough time training me. I feel defeated and I am struggling emotionally. I was told they like me and I can get in touch with them when I am more equipped and have gained more experience. I was upfront with them that this is my first NP job. They should have not hired me if they will just let me go this quick. If only I would get fired I should have not resigned from my previous RN job. I don't know what to do. I don't know anymore if NP is for me or if should I just go back to working as an RN. Any advice? 

How did you feel in those 10 days of working? Did you feel like you were equipped to do the job? 

 

CH_NP

CH_NP

12 Posts

It was chalenging for me because I was trying to learn everything. I know my limitations and I know I have so much to learn. I was honest with them that I need mentorship. For a new grad, I am most likely not “equipped” compared to the majority of the providers who were working there for 15-30 years. 

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 11 years experience. 3 Articles; 5,570 Posts

29 minutes ago, CH_NP said:

It was chalenging for me because I was trying to learn everything. I know my limitations and I know I have so much to learn. I was honest with them that I need mentorship. For a new grad, I am most likely not “equipped” compared to the majority of the providers who were working there for 15-30 years. 

What kind of clinic was it? Did you feel comfortable with the clinical role you were in (seeing and taking care of patients)? Did they allow you to start with a reasonable patient load (like 1 patient an hour)? Did you have anyone to help support you with CDM? Did you feel like you needed more CDM support? Some practices have an immediate need for providers: they want to bring a provider in and have them start with a full schedule on day 1. This can't happen for a new grad and you are better off in a place that will mentor you and allow you to grow so this just wasn't a good fit right now. Like they said, after some experience you could probably go back and step right in. 

The administrative role absolutely requires training; it is different at ever facility and getting used to workflow and EMR takes time. If they were expecting you to be efficient at admin work in the first 10 days it is (IMHO) an unreasonable expectation. 

CH_NP

CH_NP

12 Posts

I worked in a primary care clinic. I admit was not very comfortable seeing most of the patients. There are some easy visits I feel I can handle but for the majority of the visits, I have to double-check with the doc. I didn't have my own patient load since I was technically "shadowing" the providers. What do you mean by CDM support? 

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 11 years experience. 3 Articles; 5,570 Posts

Primary care can be extremely difficult especially when you don't know any of the patients. 

At the end of the day, if you were comfortable seeing most of the patients, then it was goign to be a tough and dangerous road for you at that practice. It may be a blessing in disguise to not end up there right now. 

Clinical decision making, did you feel comfortable making the clinical decisions for the patients you were seeing. In primary care this can be very challenging, especially as a new grad. 

CH_NP

CH_NP

12 Posts

Yes, I agree. Primary care is extremely difficult. Normally, I would check the chart first before I see the patient but there's a specific provider who just wants me to go straight to the room without reviewing the chart or bringing my computer into the pt's room. 

To calm myself, I try to look on the bright side and as you have said, it may be a blessing in disguise. However, the stings stay there and now I am torn if I should continue working as NP or should I just go back to working as an RN as I am more comfortable in that role. 

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 11 years experience. 3 Articles; 5,570 Posts

I am sure it stings. I still vividly remember the first job I was fired from at age 13 and a half. It has shaped my work ethic my whole life but it also still stings a bit. 

My advice would be that any job you take as an NP is going to be less comfortable for you than the RN role you know well; only time and experience working in the NP role will change that, but, that doesn't mean you shouldn't do it. This was a single, short, experience. There are lots of other jobs that will invest more in training you or allow you to work in a more confined practice area until you feel more comfortable. I have a great friend/colleague I went to NP school with that had a similar experience, she went to work in retail clinic (CVS) and she loved it. 

CH_NP

CH_NP

12 Posts

I actually worked at CVS as a nurse reviewer working from home for 6 months and did not want to leave the job because I just started there and I am more the type of person who likes to stay in the company longer.  But because I wanted to work as an NP and I do not want to slip the opportunity I took the chance and accepted this NP job. Never did I realize I will be fired this quick. It was indeed a tough decision because I love the company and learned to love the job. Despite the fact that it is a different role, I don't know if CVS will still hire someone who just resigned, although I left on good terms with the company. 

manxx

manxx, ASN, BSN, MSN, LPN, RN, APRN

Specializes in Adult NP. Has 32 years experience. 3 Posts

This is going to sound harsh, but be glad you were fired from there. Any place that is not willing to train you knowing you were a brand new NP is not the place for you! Passing the standardized test demonstrates that you have basic knowledge proficient enough to practice as a novice. If after 10 days you were fired it makes me wonder if (1) the another candidate decided they wanted the job and you were a "placeholder" until they decided (2) there were some discriminatory issues going on there, or (3) they did not really want to be bothered with a new graduate?? Look carefully at the job ad did it specifically say "new grad friendly? I am sure many NPs have been in a similar situation, we are still practicing having learned from the situation. 

If I can impart some sound advice?? "Know your worth, know your value!" You will find a niche and when you do you will love it. Until then, enjoy knowing why you became an NP. You got this!!

Be Blessed and veiled!

MLH NP