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Every mom, dad, sis, uncle believes they know better than the nurse...

Rock Toon   (174,448 Views | 55 Replies)
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Joe V specializes in Programming / Strategist / Web Development.

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You are reading page 5 of Every mom, dad, sis, uncle believes they know better than the nurse.... If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Maevish has 9 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU, Postpartum, Onc, PACU.

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PenguinsFanRN said:
Ahhhhh, Dr Google. These are some of the worst. I usually just listen as I go about my business of caring for the patient. I initially try to educate them, but usually you just have to smile and do your nurse thing. I would love to ask " oh where did you say your MD/RN degree came from???????"

Or when they say they they're a nurse and they're in school either for nursing or CNA certification...

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Yep! I'm a CNM and had a patient recently that one of the other midwives in my practice had admitted for a therapeutic rest the day before. She was 37 weeks, and had only begun care with us at 34 weeks. According to her, she was induced at 37 weeks at another hospital with her last pregnancy because she was in pain so she was demanding to be induced now because she was in the same pain. She had made no cervical change overnight and I was trying to discharge her since there was no medical reason to induce her at 37 weeks. She and her significant other sat there screaming at me that I didn't know anything and that she was in pain so clearly she needed to be induced and why wouldn't the nurse write down all the medications we had given her because they wanted their lawyer to research the medications. I should also mention that if she didn't know you were in the room, she'd be laughing and texting and seemed completely fine and then as soon as she saw me or the nurses she'd start wailing and saying she was in terrible pain. In the end I told her she was being discharged because I don't induce before 39 weeks without medical reason and that if they wanted to know what medications she had been given, they could go to medical records and get a copy of her chart. I had to call security to get her to leave. It was so lovely trying to explain to them why we don't do elective inductions early because they kept cutting me off because their lawyer (who the father had on the phone) and they knew so much better than I did.

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azhiker96 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in PACU.

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Sometimes I work hard to get pain on my postop from a 10 down to a 3-4. Then I bring in family who immediately ask the pt if they are having any pain. When the pt says yes, the family announces to me that the pt has pain. I confirm the pain, that pain after surgery is normal, and that I've already given quite a bit of pain medicine.

Invariably they ask what I've given so I reply honestly; 200 mcg fentanyl, 2 mg dilaudid, and 4 mg of morphine. I either get a deer in the headlights look or they turn to the patient and say "he gave you morphine, you shouldn't hurt anymore. "

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@ May 22, '16 by @greener22 

I remember working on Thanksgiving and a patient's brother was an anesthesiologist. She decided to have some type of ice cream at 430pm. I was on my ac dinner medication rounds and he went off on me because she had to have her insulin at 5pm exactly, despite the fact that I had 5 patients who needed their supper insulin as well. He did not care about the other patients at all and she was at the far end if the hall so would get her tray last anyway. I had to stop midway and go see her before anyone else as he demanded it.]

My response: Oh brother! (literally)

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As with so many life situations, we need to strike a balance. As some have pointed out, we can often learn from

family/visitors. Other times, we find their comments less than helpful/correct.

A lot of it is in the presentation. We have to guard against thinking we always know more and best, against

being resentful of even the most innocent questions and comments from families, and the like.

And we know, of course, that physicians many times are wrong. And we are the ones who, though often perceived

as inferior to doctors, keep them out of trouble.

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Penelope_Pitstop said:
Background: the patient is on dialysis after years of diabetes. Picture at least ten family members at bedside.

One family member (who knows the relation...sister, maybe? aunt?) says: "Well, I have the 'betes, too! But I don't need that dialysis because I keep glazed donuts in the ice box & I don't have sex."

Well then. Now we know the secret.

BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH! Thanks for telling that story!

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Orca has 25 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Corrections, psychiatry, rehab, LTC.

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Brother-in-law, in his mid 50s and diabetic, believes that enough Benadryl is the solution to pretty much any medical problem, including when his blood glucose level spikes. Even more sobering, he has worked in a medical facility for years, he has been surrounded by nurses and doctors, and he still thinks this way.

Sister-in-law (wife of the above), refused a TB skin test for work because it would give her TB. Also insists that her Turner's Syndrome is a terminal condition for which she should be given disability and be paid to sit at home, and if you say otherwise, "You just don't understand."

A couple of years ago, I was DON at a women's correctional facility (I work in a male facility now). One inmate, who was always complaining about a lack of medical care despite having a medical file about a foot thick, was chronically noncompliant. When asked about it, she said that whatever instructions and medications that we gave her, she would discuss with her family over the phone, and they would decide what she would and would not comply with. She claimed that one of the family members is a doctor. If so, that is one unethical physician. This inmate was notorious for exaggerating and completely fabricating symptoms, and if she was doing it with us, I am equally sure that she was doing it with her family. This inmate eventually sued me and she also filed a complaint against me with the BON. Both were so incoherent that neither the federal court nor the BON could figure out what she was even alleging. I still had to waste time responding.

Edited by Orca

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RNOTODAY has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU, ER, OR.

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I blame fully WebMd and sites like them !!!!

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