Drill weekends

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  • Specializes in Tele, ICU, CVICU. Has 7 years experience.

I am suppose to go to drill in January... I have not been to OBC yet. Will they have someone that walks me through everything? I am nervous about all this. Thanks for any insight into this.

C

deftonez188

442 Posts

Someone will walk you through - nothing to be nervous about, drill is chill :D

armyicurn

331 Posts

Specializes in ICU-my whole life!!.

Call your unit and ask who will be your supervisor. He/she should get you taken care of.

Specializes in Cardiac Tele, Cath Lab, ICU, ICUSD. Has 8 years experience.

My recruiter told me that she would accompany to drill the first time and get me in touch with someone who would walk me through things. Im not sure if that is how it goes everywhere, but it made me feel alot better about things.

QTMedic4life

33 Posts

I will have to agree that drill is chill. I am normally two or three people's sponsor for their first drill weekend. All you do is inprocess usually on day one and day two it's pretty much more paperwork and uniforms ordered etc etc. We show our soldiers around and figure out where they are supposed to be for the remaining portion of drill weekend. Sometimes recruiters come and sometimes they don't. Recruiters offer great entertainment because I will admit before you get an assignment you are pretty bored. I take homework and I have like four or five assignments. So like I said it's pretty chill at drill weekend. Relax have fun and get to know your troops.

~Azi J

pH7.40, LPN

39 Posts

Specializes in MSICU.
I am suppose to go to drill in January... I have not been to OBC yet. Will they have someone that walks me through everything? I am nervous about all this. Thanks for any insight into this.

C

I'm in the same boat and was wondering what this would be like. Thanks for asking. If I find out anything else

will let you know.

patrick1rn, MSN, RN, NP

1 Article; 420 Posts

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

Please dont think that "Drill is Chill". I dont know what kind of unit you are going to. I am still an enlisted medic in the National Guard, but chill is not on the training schedule. I spent my active duty time as a paratrooper and flight medic in a special operations unit, I joined the guard and went to infantry unit and then to a medical company and back again to infantry unit . Please dont think that drill is chill, junior soldiers who have never deployed in combat need as much medical knowledge that you can afford to give them, assuming you know anything about trauma, but any knowledge, even the basics is a great thing. Listen to your senior NCOs, they lead the men and women under your command.

If your assigned to a field hospital, dont be one of those people who think because they have rank, they dont have to set up the field hospital, the longer those tents and equipment are down, the longer a combat medic in the field has to stablize a casualty with limited equipement and supplies.

Do learn as much as you can about going to the field like learning how to put your helmet together, your rucksack and your gear. Learn from the medics that have been in the @#*& ( starts with a S), in combat, those tricks of the trade can save your life and your casualty.

If your in the army, learn to shape your beret so it doesnt look like a bakers hat, shaze it, wet it and form it. Learn how to properly salute as not to do a side arm bicep curl when you salute back to your soldiers.

No, soldiers, marines, airforce and Navy folks out in the battlefield need reserve and guard doctors and nurses that can "soldier" on in the battlefield setting, Drill is not the time to chill, Drill is the time to prepare yourself, your unit and your soldiers for combat.

Patrick, RN, MSN ( FNP graduate Dec 2008)

Combat Medic: Desert Storm, Operation Enduring Freedom:up:

lifeafter40

244 Posts

I fully agree with the sentiment of your post, but i also think that the earlier posters were using the phrase, "Drill is Chill" to ease the nerves of a newly Commissioned Officer who has no previous experience in the Army. Anyone who has gone through that initial induction experience, be it Officer or Enlisted, knows how nerve racking it can be. Their intent, I believe, was not to belittle the importance of weekend drills, but to assure the OP that they had little to worry about when going to their first drill. Remember... many people's only exposure to the military is what they have seen on TV or at the movies, and that can paint a very scary, and inaccurate, picture.

That being said, I appreciate the thoughtful response, and the motivational attitude behind your comments, and hope that all soldiers in every capacity will take them to heart.... every opportunity should be taking to hone skills and prepare our soldiers for what will confront them when they do get deployed... lives are at risk otherwise.

LA40

deftonez188

442 Posts

Please dont think that "Drill is Chill". I dont know what kind of unit you are going to. I am still an enlisted medic in the National Guard, but chill is not on the training schedule. I spent my active duty time as a paratrooper and flight medic in a special operations unit, I joined the guard and went to infantry unit and then to a medical company and back again to infantry unit . Please dont think that drill is chill, junior soldiers who have never deployed in combat need as much medical knowledge that you can afford to give them, assuming you know anything about trauma, but any knowledge, even the basics is a great thing. Listen to your senior NCOs, they lead the men and women under your command.

If your assigned to a field hospital, dont be one of those people who think because they have rank, they dont have to set up the field hospital, the longer those tents and equipment are down, the longer a combat medic in the field has to stablize a casualty with limited equipement and supplies.

Do learn as much as you can about going to the field like learning how to put your helmet together, your rucksack and your gear. Learn from the medics that have been in the @#*& ( starts with a S), in combat, those tricks of the trade can save your life and your casualty.

If your in the army, learn to shape your beret so it doesnt look like a bakers hat, shaze it, wet it and form it. Learn how to properly salute as not to do a side arm bicep curl when you salute back to your soldiers.

No, soldiers, marines, airforce and Navy folks out in the battlefield need reserve and guard doctors and nurses that can "soldier" on in the battlefield setting, Drill is not the time to chill, Drill is the time to prepare yourself, your unit and your soldiers for combat.

Patrick, RN, MSN ( FNP graduate Dec 2008)

Combat Medic: Desert Storm, Operation Enduring Freedom:up:

No need to preach, my statement was aimed at reducing the anxiety associated with new membership in our big boy and girl club. Also keep in mind that your vision of the military will not be the same as the rest, as well, that doesn't make theirs any less noble.

Anyways, drill is chill, we work hard, we play hard - the military stuff is easy, it's your medical knowledge that is the key newcomers!

Specializes in critical care: trauma/oncology/burns. Has 38 years experience.

Hi: Well, I think your Battle Assembly or Drill depends on what the METL of your TPU is. Also, when was the last time the unit, as a whole, was deployed? What kind of unit are you assigned to? A CSH? An IMSU?

At first I was taken aback by the phrase "drill is chill" because I worked my butt off! There were SRPs, MEDRETEs, other medical missions PLUS I had to go to OBLC, keep up with all the on-line Soldier stuff [certificates etc] and, again according to your units METL we 66H's had to TEACH various medical skills needed for when one would be down range.

But now I understand why that phrase was used. Hopefully you will have a good person as a sponsor, someone who can show you the ropes...Help you gather up your completed ACUs (if you already don't have at least one) show you the correct wear of the beret and the class A's, stuff like that. Plus, as another poster stated, lots of paperwork and you get to meet your S1.

Please listen to your NCOs, especially your SFC and your 1SGT. They have been "around the block" several times :p

Do you have an AKO account? If you do there is a wealth of information there, all you need do is seek it out.

All the best to you! Hooah!

athena

Specializes in Med Surg, Geriatrics. Has 7 years experience.

Does anyone know if you are an ASN nurse in the reserves and want to continue your eduacation toward BSN. Can you prevent from being deployed until you finish your schooling. I read somewhere in the post but forgot what it is called.TNX

Dave

deftonez188

442 Posts

Does anyone know if you are an ASN nurse in the reserves and want to continue your eduacation toward BSN. Can you prevent from being deployed until you finish your schooling. I read somewhere in the post but forgot what it is called.TNX

Dave

While you can't completely prevent being deployed in the reserves/guard, you can try to work with the unit you are going to so you can attend school with minimal interruption. For example (AFANG), I worked out with my commander at the time that i'd be able to attend our two weeks a year/other taskings in the summer. I attended everything I could to keep good in the eyes of the unit so that if I DID have to miss something (other than a trip to the sandbox) it wouldn't be frowned upon.

It worked out great for me - so it is possible, but talk with your unit BEFORE signing up otherwise you're taking a risk.

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