Jump to content

Do Bachelor's Degrees Save Lives? - The Facts about Earning a BSN

Nurses Article Sponsor   (46,900 Views 189 Replies 960 Words)
by Rasmussen College Rasmussen College (Sponsor) Sponsor Verified

3 Articles; 5,218 Visitors; 5 Posts

Sponsored Content
advertisement

In most lines of work, there’s one clear path to getting your foot in the door. But nursing is unique in that it offers multiple paths to entry-level positions. Whether you’ve earned a diploma, an associate degree or a bachelor’s degree, you know there is more than one way to become an RN. You are reading page 4 of Do Bachelor's Degrees Save Lives? - The Facts about Earning a BSN. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

4,880 Visitors; 306 Posts

I believe that while my BSN was't too valuable in terms of actual physical and applicable knowledge, it was a gateway for me to a new job, more respect and more job opportunities. Not only that, but it particularly allowed me to pursue a graduate education where I really feel like I am now learning some real science that I was hungering for in nursing school. What I have learned in grad school about pathophysiology and pharmacology makes me realize how little I knew before. I thought I was doing my job just fine (and I probably was according to educational level) but now I understand so much more about the science behind what I'm doing. It's liberating. I'm all for a BSN as entry-level requirement. It hurts the profession not to.

Here's the thing (and it's especially evident to those of us who have practiced for a number of years with an ADN or a nursing diploma and then went back to school for a BSN)... one of the main problems with twisting nurses arms into getting a BSN is that the RN to BSN programs offer almost zero real educational value for your time and money spent. It didn't have to be that way. Take those grad school pathophys and pharmacology classes that you found were actually useful - imagine if they could be substituted for core credits towards the BSN rather than the busywork, theory, and indoctrination courses that make up the core of said programs? There's so much to learn about nursing practice that RN to BSN programs don't begin to cover. Why bog nurses down with subject matter that makes little difference to their practice (and this even includes those nurse who'd like to be managers) while offering so little in the way of education that does? I could offer up some answers to my (mostly-rhetorical) question, but they would probably make me sound even grumpier and more cynical than I already do.

I honestly believe that I would stand to improve my practice more by taking classes in Spanish than by earning a BSN at this point. Much more, in truth. That doesn't speak well of the RN to BSN program.

I understand that a BSN offers some degree of job security, opportunities to get a further education that might actually be useful and practical, or even more prestige/clout for the nursing profession as a whole. But it's also very easy to see an employer-required BSN as a massive load of mandatory overtime for which instead of getting paid, I fork out the cash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CanadianRN16 specializes in Geriatrics.

2,163 Visitors; 109 Posts

In Canada, they successfully transitioned to BSN only nurses in 9/10 provinces, where those with the associate degree equivalent are grandfathered in.

I can understand the reluctance to get a BSN, when there's minimal pay difference and one is happy with their career. However, it only makes sense to streamline educational standards so every one has the same qualifications. Every other health professionals is like that, right?

Given the proven increase in patient safety outcomes, it makes sense to change the standards for future nurses to go about the push...and not penalize already registered nurses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4,880 Visitors; 306 Posts

In Canada, they successfully transitioned to BSN only nurses in 9/10 provinces, where those with the associate degree equivalent are grandfathered in.

I can understand the reluctance to get a BSN, when there's minimal pay difference and one is happy with their career. However, it only makes sense to streamline educational standards so every one has the same qualifications. Every other health professionals is like that, right?

Given the proven increase in patient safety outcomes, it makes sense to change the standards for future nurses to go about the push...and not penalize already registered nurses.

I'm not objecting to your entire post - just the part in bold. If there is a study with a large sample size comparing BSNs to ADNs that actually controls for total years of professional experience and clinical setting in making their calculations that BSNs are safer, I'd LOVE to see it. Otherwise, don't just state it as though it were a fact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Article; 14,357 Visitors; 1,509 Posts

It does not matter as much that some nurses do not see the advantage of a BSN education or want to spend time as well as additional money to obtain it. The job market and desire for non bedside or hospital jobs drives the market for BSN educated nurses. Where I live BSN is standard and nurses without a BSN have a hard time finding desired jobs.

I do not agree that the BSN classes are just added fluff but not everybody finds for example nursing theory valuable and want to apply that knowledge in daily work.

The BSN alone does not save life ... it is the work conditions with too many patients per nurse and not enough CNA that makes good nursing hard to accomplish and increases the risk for unsafe practice imo.

Because there are too many nurses in the market to begin with, healthcare administration does not even have to look and change any ratios or get sufficiently functioning CNA because if a RN leaves there are already new grads in line to take a job , no matter how crappy or unsafe.

In my area there is a shortage of hospice nurses. The work conditions for home hospice case manager (which is not a desk job...) are rough due to time constraints, huge amount of documentation, and salaried employment. You would think that they look at what is going on and change the case load that has been going up for years. But no - instead they just put a stop onto admissions because there are literally not enough nurses to care for hospice patients or nurses with necessary experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Farawyn has 25 years experience and specializes in A little bit of everything..

2 Followers; 97,575 Visitors; 12,645 Posts

RN-BSN vs BSN right out of the gate?

Very different.

I have a BA. Then I got my ASN.

Now in the process of the bridge. All I can say is *yawn*.

I probably won't complete it. I have 2 jobs now, despite being a lowly ASN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

flying_ace2 has 1+ years experience and specializes in Pharmaceutical Research, Operating Room.

5,200 Visitors; 193 Posts

Jobs in acute care are seriously overrated. Everyone (and their mommas) can have those acute care hospital jobs. Meanwhile, the rest of us can enjoy non-hospital jobs that involve less stress, more money, and optimal working conditions.

The wave of nursing's future is away from the bedside. I will attempt to ride that wave for as long as possible, thank you very much!

Could not have said it better myself!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

flying_ace2 has 1+ years experience and specializes in Pharmaceutical Research, Operating Room.

5,200 Visitors; 193 Posts

If this is so wonderful, the next thing since sliced bread, then why aren't the govt and the hospitals willing to shell out for tuition reimbursement and raises!

Because if you can force people into debt slavery through outrageous student loans for years and years to come, you can all but guarantee that those people will be stuck working in low wage jobs with no or almost no opportunity for advancement away from said crap job for years and years to come......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Farawyn has 25 years experience and specializes in A little bit of everything..

2 Followers; 97,575 Visitors; 12,645 Posts

Could not have said it better myself!!!

I don't think everyone can do acute care. It takes smarts, strength and endurance.

I think acute care nurses are underrated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2,289 Visitors; 69 Posts

I think experience is the best teacher, not earning a BSN. I am currently doing a BSN online program and much of the content is repetitive and is what I already learned in my ASN program. I feel that I learn so much more while I am at work every day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,683 Visitors; 67 Posts

They Irony about the whole ASN BSN debate, I have seen more ASN pass the NCLEX on the first try then BSN. Guess all that paper writing didn't give the critical thinking skills after all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

14,257 Visitors; 923 Posts

Diploma program in my state changed hands to a private university. Cost for the BSN $16,000 a semester.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×