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DNP required for NP?

Posted

Hi guys I'm new here, does anyone know if they are requiring DNP now for NP because I'm planning to start my masters FNP this December.. Because I read in some articles that starting in 2015 they are supposed to be required? I'm from Nevada

Edited by ronrandallgabiola

There is no requirement. The AACN has been pushing this idea for a long time now, but most of the professional groups are not jumping on the bandwagon. The only advanced practice group that has embraced the mandatory-DNP idea is the CRNAs,, and their target date is 2025, not 2015. If it were actually going to be required as of 2015, there would have been a lot more publicity about that long before now.

Thank you very much for the reply. So lets say i finish my masters fnp 2017. Then say at 2025 they require DNP as entry level degree for np. What will happen to us who has masters degree? Do we need to go back to school again?

So far, all the discussion has involved "grandfathering in" the existing, MSN-prepared NPs, but no one really knows what will happen, and it may vary from state to state.

Rocknurse, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Critical Care and ED. Has 32 years experience.

A friend of mine fell for the hype and went to do her DNP which she regretted when she realized there was no requirement. She's stuck with $100,000 in loans now. She just graduated and has her doctorate and landed a good job, so she feels better about it now. My MSN will cost a fraction of her DNP. If they bring in the requirement after I've graduate I might consider a post grad certificate if I felt it was necessary. Right now I just want to get my NP.

PMFB-RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response. Has 16 years experience.

There is no requirement. The AACN has been pushing this idea for a long time now, but most of the professional groups are not jumping on the bandwagon. The only advanced practice group that has embraced the mandatory-DNP idea is the CRNAs,, and their target date is 2025, not 2015. If it were actually going to be required as of 2015, there would have been a lot more publicity about that long before now.

Good and informative reply elkpark. Just wanted to point out that CRNA will require a doctorate in 2025, not necessary a DNP. Most CRNA programs can't grant nursing degrees and so will grant other types of doctorates like doctor of nurse anesthesia.

Sweet&Petite, RN

Specializes in Women's Health.

They are trying to push for the DNP for NP but it may take many more years. MSN is the minimal degree for NP at the moment. I don't know if its worth it to spend a whole lot of extra money for the DNP. I don't think many companies are really going to pay that much more. If you get your MSN now, its a really easy transition to get the DNP once you have a MSN.

Thank you very much for the replies. I'm gonna start my msn fnp this december 11. goodluck to me!

hi! I just got accepted at llu for the dnp program. I'm excited but at the same time worried abt how much it will cost me!! I'm actually thinking twice if I should do msn first - cheaper.. I'm in such dilemma!!

xenogenetic

Specializes in Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Nursing.

Not only consider the extra money necessary to obtain your DNP, but also factor in the time involved for what you are getting back in return. Its the "opportunity cost" of what you are actively choosing to give up to devote to your DNP studies. Family time (spending time with kids, or aging parents sometimes can't wait because father time slows for no one) especially after already dedicating a lot of time to obtain your MSN, depending how old you are, might be worth much more to you than $ or the title of "Dr." This is not even factoring in whether the market will actually pay you more being a DNP versus a MSN prepared NP, which is definitely debatable.

I def agree with you. Here's the thing, I'm only 24, no kids, and I do want to just get over with school by just going all the way to dnp rather doing msn then dnp. But then, I don't want to owe 100,000 + after. So it's really time vs money. It's like going to west coast univ for bsn spending 130K VS getting associates at a community college then getting the bsn degree for less than 10k in a private school. Also, Im not even sure if I will get paid more than those with MSN if I get my DNP later. So much to think about. Loma linda is such a beautiful university, its tempting but then again, way too expensive 😫

Good and informative reply elkpark. Just wanted to point out that CRNA will require a doctorate in 2025, not necessary a DNP. Most CRNA programs can't grant nursing degrees and so will grant other types of doctorates like doctor of nurse anesthesia.

Yes -- I was just using the term "DNP" in a generic sense to avoid making the topic any more confusing than it already is for people who are new to the issue.

PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry.

There's no enhancement to outcomes, practic, revenue, etc. so associates with the DNP so I doubt it'll ever be a requirement. How does filling the physician gap with people who have to spend time and money taking research and policy courses benefit sick people?

Goldenfox

Has 12 years experience.

The DNP is not a research degree, nor does it focus much on health policy. I'm in a DNP program right now, and I would say that it is a hodge podge of all sorts of things that are supposed to guide the doctoral candidate towards implementing EBP change processes in the clinical setting. Some of it makes sense. A lot of it doesn't...just like much of nursing academia. For that reason I agree with you that the DNP will perhaps never actually become a practice requirement.

I suspect that they rushed to implement the DNP degree without fully sussing out what it should actually be. I like my DNP program, but I still don't see why every NP should need to study these things because much of it has no relevance at all to the bulk of what we do for the patients.

PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry.

The DNP is not a research degree, nor does it focus much on health policy. I'm in a DNP program right now, and I would say that it is a hodge podge of all sorts of things that are supposed to guide the doctoral candidate towards implementing EBP change processes in the clinical setting. Some of it makes sense. A lot of it doesn't...just like much of nursing academia. For that reason I agree with you that the DNP will perhaps never actually become a practice requirement.

I suspect that they rushed to implement the DNP degree without fully sussing out what it should actually be. I like my DNP program, but I still don't see why every NP should need to study these things because much of it has no relevance at all to the bulk of what we do for the patients.

But its definitely not clinical

applesxoranges, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

Ok, I feel better now. I know one of my job's this rumor is flying around. I heard it was only a recommendation but hadn't heard it was official. Supposedly the ANCC was requiring the DNP to test if you hadn't started a program before the end of 2015.

Bumex, DNP, NP

Specializes in Assistant Professor, Nephrology, Internal Medicine. Has 11 years experience.

I'll just leave my two cents on how I choose between the DNP and MSN level NP preparation.

I already have an MSN in a non-clinical area, so I originally thought, "why in the world would I get another MSN or post master's cert?!" So I applied to a few DNP programs and got accepted. Now some of these schools had MSN and DNP level NP education. When I was discussing tuition, transfer credits, etc. I found out that the bulk of my MSN wouldn't transfer, due to various issues, mainly being that something like advanced health policy for a MSN.Ed program has a different emphasis than a DNP/MSN-NP program. I thought, no big deal, until I looked at the tuition differences.

For example, take advanced Health Assessment:

MSN tuition was X, DNP tuition was X +$200 per credit

Same class, in fact the cohorts from MSN and DNP were mixed together, but the DNP was more expensive.

I did calculations and figured out that I basically had to redo the MSN level classes I took (minus a few because they were fluff and did transfer). So, if I wanted to go for the right now, I would pay more for the same classes.

So, I eventually decided to do a post-masters. Tuition is master's level, and I can get done in 1.5 years as opposed to 3.5. I plan on going for the DNP sometime, but this way I can get it after already being an NP.

SO, MY PROS AND CONS LIST: (off the top of my head from what I can remember)

MSN/PSM

PROS:

-cheaper

-can complete program in two fewer years

-get out there and gain NP experience sooner

-Possibly get a bigger paycheck depending on specialty

CONS:

-Not doing terminal degree

-losing out on the advanced leadership courses that most DNP programs offer

-losing out on clinical hours (MSN 500-700 hours, DNP 1000 hours)

-Losing out on specialization rotations (d/t fewer hours and less chance to diversify rotations)

DNP:

PROS:

-gaining extra leadership courses

-gaining extra specialization opportunities

-Terminal degree in field

CONS:

-extra time required before you can certify

-extra money, and a lot of it

-usually higher tuition per credit hour

-territory issues with physicians about having a doctoral degree (I've discussed this with several physician's, the vast majority don't care, but some do find it an issue"

Feel free anyone else to chime in! Like I said, this was my two cents, take it for what it is. In reality you need to evaluate your situation and make a choice based on what you desire!