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Discrimination Against ER Nurses?

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by DaveBSN DaveBSN (Member)

1,270 Profile Views; 24 Posts

You are reading page 2 of Discrimination Against ER Nurses?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

ChristineN is a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatric/Adolescent, Med-Surg.

3,464 Posts; 28,613 Profile Views

According to the ANA, there's a shortage.

So then how do you explain all the unemployed RN's?

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calivianya is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

2,418 Posts; 35,576 Profile Views

I think the people talking about shortages are looking at how staffing should be done, and not how it is actually being done. It is like the NCLEX world vs. the real world. In the NCLEX world, a 5:1 ratio for med/surg sounds great, but in the real world, nurses who really need to put food on the table cannot leave if the ratio has crept to 8:1. Also, in the short run, it is cheaper to abuse the staff you have until they break than it is to hire new people. Let's say a hospital pays its staff $20/hr, which is what I made last year. Me working an overtime shift at $30/hr is cheaper than having me plus an orientee, where they would be paying $40/hr for the same number of patients being cared for. Look at that, they just saved around $120 over just one 12 hour shift. Of course this is not sustainable in the long run, but who cares as long as they save money right now? So yep - the shortage is imaginary.

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24 Posts; 1,270 Profile Views

I'm just trying to find my way and get with a good hospital system. That's all... Every hospital in this area is looking for nurses and has residency programs for new nurses. In the Dallas area alone there are more than 1,000 open nursing positions that hospitals are looking to fill. That number does not decrease. Page after page after page of nursing positions. Every day there are new positions being listed. This does not speak to a surplus but rather a shortage on the whole. I appreciate all of your comments.

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24 Posts; 1,270 Profile Views

I get what you're saying and appreciate your comments.

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itsmejuli specializes in Home Care.

1 Article; 2,188 Posts; 18,964 Profile Views

Read through the forums here on AN and you'll find your reality check.

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24 Posts; 1,270 Profile Views

There's no need to be abrasive.

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2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 104,169 Profile Views

I'm just trying to find my way and get with a good hospital system. That's all... Every hospital in this area is looking for nurses and has residency programs for new nurses. In the Dallas area alone there are more than 1,000 open nursing positions that hospitals are looking to fill. That number does not decrease. Page after page after page of nursing positions. Every day there are new positions being listed. This does not speak to a surplus but rather a shortage on the whole. I appreciate all of your comments.

As already noted, openings listed by a hospital does not equate to number of positions they are actually looking to fill. Lots of hospitals list large numbers of open positions that they have no intention of filling. In my last job before my current positions, that large "healthcare system" listed tons of open nursing positions on any given day. We used to joke that, if the hospital were really that short of nurses (as the number of job postings suggested), the hospital wouldn't be able to continue operating from day to day -- yet it was operating just fine. And the number of nursing positions listed never seemed to decrease. And new graduates in the area had a v. hard time finding work.

There may be, in some areas, a shortage of experienced RNs, and RNs with specific skills and credentials. But there is no shortage of warm bodies with RN licenses and, in the current economic and employment climate, employers are getting, in many cases, hundreds of applications for open positions. They can afford to be extremely choosy.

Best wishes.

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meanmaryjean has 40 years experience as a DNP, RN and specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia.

3 Followers; 7,565 Posts; 65,439 Profile Views

Can you share how your previous contract was breached? Was it a written contract?

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24 Posts; 1,270 Profile Views

Yes, it was a written contract that guaranteed 4 to 6 weeks training with a preceptor on the systems used to chart, place verbal orders, etc. I needed training on 3 different systems and barely received training on one of them. I was pulled out of training and put on my own after only 6 days without a word. In those 6 days with my preceptor, we perhaps had no more than an hour or two to go over the system so I was completely unprepared and placed on a no win situation.

There was no consultation with my nurse manager before this was done. There was no inquiry made to either my preceptor or myself as to how I felt about it. Suddenly I was just placed on my own. I'm a very good skilled nurse but if I do not know how to use a system, I am dead in the water as any nurse would be. Within just a few days, I had physicians yelling at me because things weren't documented when I had never been shown where to document them but as we all know, physicians don't care. They just want it done.

When this issue became coupled with extreme patient overload and only two actual breaks in 3 months, I decided it was better to seek other opportunities before my license was put in jeopardy which is why this particular ER still has a revolving door to this day. The hospital lost $6,000 in signing bonuses and relocation due to the breach. They are not seeking to recover the funds and I am a re-hire. HR openly admits to the contract being unenforceable. Needless to say, I won't be returning. Basically, I moved 800 miles only to be completely screwed over.

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452 Posts; 8,961 Profile Views

According to the ANA, there's a shortage.

"The long-predicted nursing shortage may have been averted, according to Vanderbilt professor Peter Buerhaus.

Buerhaus, one of the nation’s leading experts on nursing labor supply, spoke at a recent healthcare workforce summit in Grapevine sponsored by Irving-based AMN Healthcare."

http://healthcare.dmagazine.com/2014/01/08/nursing-shortage-not-in-dallas-fort-worth/

Forbes:

"Has Nursing Shortage Been Over-hyped As a Career Choice?"

http://www.forbes.com/sites/alisongriswold/2012/06/18/has-nursing-been-overhyped-as-a-career-choice/

The Wall Street Journal

"Ms. Smith, 27 years old, received a bachelor’s degree in nursing from theUniversity of San Francisco last year. But despite graduating summa cum laude and volunteering in both the U.S. and Guatemala, she has been unable to find a nursing job. Instead, she is working as a nanny and living on food stamps."

http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2013/04/25/the-myth-of-the-nursing-shortage/

CNN Money

I can't find a nursing job!

"Whatever happened to the nursing shortage? These new grads can't find jobs, after months of searching.

Where's this so-called shortage?"

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24 Posts; 1,270 Profile Views

Seems like there are some really vindictive nurses commenting on this post. If you're just going to laugh at me, there's no need to post. Nurses are supposed to be compassionate, not laughing at others expense or trying to tear someone down.

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