Delayed Cord Clamping

Posted
by jloyloe (New) New

Does anyone work in L&D? I'm doing my BSN Capstone Project on delayed cord clamping and am curious if anyone practices it in their facility. My project is aimed towards the benefits of implementing delayed cord clamping and would love any opinions, particularly negative feedback so I can present all sides. All of my evidence-based research has come up empty handed on any negative aspects of implementing. I have a handful of friends in L&D and have yet to come across any facilities who practice it.

Personally I am all for it. The benefits far outweigh the risks and I have yet to come across any evidence-based practice for immediate cord clamping or against delayed cord clamping. However there isn't much clinical opinion from those who actually practice it and their thoughts. Thanks!

Yes this is homework and no I'm not looking for anyone to do it for me :)

nurseprnRN, BSN, RN

2 Articles; 11,114 Posts

It sounds like you've done some work already, so we won't hassle you about doing your homework for you.

Alas, I know no more about OB than "I had two kids," :) You might want to post this on the OB nursing forum for a better response.

jloyloe

10 Posts

Thanks so much GrnTea! Yeah I guess the OB nursing forum makes more sense :)

jloyloe

10 Posts

I'm doing my BSN Capstone Project on delayed cord clamping and am curious if anyone practices it in their facility. My project is aimed towards the benefits of implementing delayed cord clamping and would love any opinions, particularly negative feedback so I can present all sides. All of my evidence-based research has come up empty handed on any negative aspects of implementing. I have a handful of friends in L&D and have yet to come across any facilities who practice it.

Personally I am all for it. The benefits far outweigh the risks and I have yet to come across any evidence-based practice for immediate cord clamping or against delayed cord clamping. However there isn't much clinical opinion from those who actually practice it and their thoughts. Thanks!

Yes this is homework and no I'm not looking for anyone to do it for me :)

Edited by jloyloe
spelling

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,116 Posts

First, I am in favor of delayed cord clamping.

If you're looking for "con" positions, I would try googling delayed cord clamping and jaundice/polycythemia.

Our facility has a standard practice of delaying clamping for 60 seconds on all preterm deliveries. I think it's amazing, especially when you have a 24-weeker and the peds team is chomping at the bit to get that baby.

jloyloe

10 Posts

Thanks klone! I have come across those two and was curious if anyone has complaints/issues first hand from implementing delayed cord clamping. The preterm benefits are outstanding for something as easy as waiting a matter of seconds to clamp the cord. It's great to hear your facility implements 60 seconds! Thanks again for responding.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,116 Posts

I heard, anecdotally from my OB preceptor 10 years ago when I was a student, about a homebirth midwife who stripped the cord, and the baby ended up with kernicterus (sp?). That's all I have.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 16 years experience. 224 Articles; 27,608 Posts

Duplicate threads have been merged into one.

TiffyRN, ADN, BSN, PhD

Specializes in NICU. Has 29 years experience. 2,309 Posts

Anecdotally we've noticed that the little ones struggle to stay warm when they are laying there for 30-60 seconds. Honestly, most of the time the OBs won't wait more than 30 seconds. When we first implemented delayed cord clamping there was a perception that there was increased hypothermia. We modified or procedure and started putting the kids in plastic bags even if they wouldn't usually qualify (

The issue is that providers perceive delayed cord clamping as being dangerous when the majority of the evidence supports it. At least for preterm (which is what I deal with).

I don't feel like making APA references here, I bet you can copy/paste these titles in your school library, they're both pretty recent.

Delayed Cord Clamping in Very Preterm Infants Reduces the Incidence of Intraventricular Hemorrhage and Late-Onset Sepsis: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

[h=1]Beliefs and Practices of Obstetric Care Providers Regarding Umbilical Cord Clamping[/h]

jloyloe

10 Posts

Thank you so much TiffyRN! This is very helpful insight.

liane90

99 Posts

I was the patient in this situation, not an employee. I asked them about the delayed cord clamping, and they assured me that they would do it upon my request. Then I was completely ignored and they clamped it immediately after he was out. I wish that more facilities practiced it and it was common place. They are still seeing benefits after four years of age for those that did it in such a way. It is refreshing to see more taking an active interest in it. Although I cannot be much of an assistance as far as finding a live person to speak with on the matter, usa.gov has been my go to for nearly any subject I wanted clinical trials and studies on. Good luck in your endeavors.

mamagui

Specializes in Eventually Midwifery. Has 1+ years experience. 434 Posts

I attend the medical university's nursing program and we talked about delayed cord clamping and EBP, but during my OB rotation at the same hospital, they did NOT delay the cord clamping. SMH.