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Dear Doctor

Posted

Saw this today, thought it was interesting

Dear Doctor,

I know it's almost doctor's day, and I know in a couple of months nurses get a whole week. But there's a serious intricacy that I think is lacking in our healthcare system. Doctors need to let the nurses who with them, that go above and beyond on a daily basis, that they notice and that they are appreciated. I find this very appropriate...

"Did you see me anticipate your need? That I knew what you wanted, even before you did? Did you notice me pay attention and pull open the chart to the exact part you were wondering about, even though you weren't talking to me? Did you see me take the patient for the test you ordered stat, even though I didn't have to, just so it would be done quicker? Did you hear me on the phone demanding an ICU bed so your patient could get the care they so desperately needed? Did you see me catch your near fatal mistake? Did you hear me question your order when you were heading in the wrong direction? Did you listen to my suggestions when you hit a roadblock of your own? Did you notice my offer to help, even though it wasn't my patient or even my unit? Did you notice my incredible technical skill as well as my compassion? Did you tell me?

- An Anonymous Nurse"

You should. You should tell them. A nurse is always a patient advocate, but if you make your nurse feel valued and appreciated they will go the extra mile for you as well. A great nurse is worth their weight in gold, and if you realize this and have on in your life, the least you can do is tell them so.

Copied and pasted from...

Dear Doctor... - FearlessBlogging.com

Edited by Joe V

You should go the extra mile not because the doctor appreciates you, but you should go the extra mile because its better for the patient.

I am a physician. I work close to 100 hours a week. When I am not in the hospital, all the nurses have my personal cell phone number so that they can call me at any and all hours of the night about my patients. I come in and see my patients every day of the week if I am in town, even if there is a doctor covering me.

I think about my patients while I am driving, while I am eating, and I even dream about my patients, because I am so worried knowing my decisions could mean their well-being or their death.

That is going the extra mile on the physician's end. I go this extra mile not because my partners appreciate me, the nurses appreciate me, or the hospital CEO appreciates me. I do it all for my patients.

You are not working for me; you do not need my appreciation. You are working for the patient, as am I.

Edited by tobra99

DARLINGLILITH

Specializes in med surg, peds, icu, ortho, geriatrics. Has 23 years experience.

I work with amazing docs...why on earth would I expect them to praise every aspect of my nursing care? Everyone should be using common courtesy and professionalism in dealing with patients and colleagues; I do not need or expect anything else.

EmergencyRN22

Specializes in Emergency Room.

I'm not a little puppy that needs scratched behind the ear every time I tinkle outside (as I should). Haha

just being respectful and kind is all I need. I didn't go into this profession to be patronized like a good puppy.

Just my two cents.

;)

That letter is annoying like oh I don't know..a whiney child.

Emergent, RN

Has 27 years experience.

Since my emergency surgery recently, I have increased respect for physicians who dedicate over a decade to train to heal. The surgeon who worked on putting me back together must have trained for well over 12 years to master his art. I thank God that there are men and women so dedicated.

I also appreciate all the other hard working disciplines who came together to make me whole. But that surgeon holds a special place in my heart.

Since my emergency surgery recently, I have increased respect for physicians who dedicate over a decade to train to heal. The surgeon who worked on putting me back together must have trained for well over 12 years to master his art. I thank God that there are men and women so dedicated.

I also appreciate all the other hard working disciplines who came together to make me whole. But that surgeon holds a special place in my heart.

The average surgeon has 14-16 years of formal education/training after high school. Sometimes I find myself kicking myself when I look back and realize how much time and energy I have spent...

Gee, doctors only get a day while nurses get a week. I think both should be equally appreciated for the work they do.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

I think about my patients while I am driving, while I am eating, and I even dream about my patients, because I am so worried knowing my decisions could mean their well-being or their death.

You are working for the patient, as am I.

I am the same way. I spend most of my "default mode" either thinking about my patients or reflecting back on my practice. It is always surprising the insight you can have into a patient while sleeping.

In the same vein, I am so grateful I have nurses watching my back. Someone who has eyes and ears on our patient at all hours, who checks my 3am admit orders for the inevitable mistake, who calls when the patient "just doesn't seem right". Floor nurses are often the last and most important line of defense.

I am also grateful for the surgeons and other specialists that have devoted a large portion of their lives, sacrificed friends and family, to do a job I can't do. In a way these specialists are also the last line of defense.

I have great respect for any provider, regardless of degree, who takes the responsibility to be the last line of defense for a patient.

Sent from my iPhone.

Since my emergency surgery recently, I have increased respect for physicians who dedicate over a decade to train to heal. The surgeon who worked on putting me back together must have trained for well over 12 years to master his art. I thank God that there are men and women so dedicated.

I also appreciate all the other hard working disciplines who came together to make me whole. But that surgeon holds a special place in my heart.

I hear you there. The neurosurgeon who operated on me a few years back has a special place in my heart. Seeing as I didn't have insurance at the time he never sent me a bill for the consultation and saw me when no other NS would because of my lack of insurance. I sent emails off to the hospital and to the various NS associations that he is part of praising him On my last visit to see him he mentioned it, lol.

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 9 years experience.

How odd to write a note starting with Doctor's Appreciation Day coming up and then turning it into a demand for more attention and appreciate for yourself. I am honestly scratching my head on that one. It is kind of like luring someone in with the promise of something nice and then bonking them upside the head. Not going to do much to enhance the relationship between doctors and nurses.

Emergent, RN

Has 27 years experience.

I see the poster joined here recently, and this is her only post. Methinks someone is trying to promote her blog...

To the blogger in question: A writing course would be helpful for you.

macawake, MSN

Has 12 years experience.

I agree with previous posters.

Most of the things done by nurses described in this letter is called "doing your darn job". Yes, a skilled nurse is very valuble to a physician/provider and it's my experience that most physicians understand this. The reverse is also true. My job is made a whole lot easier when the physicians I work with are skilled and conscientious, and most of them are.

I think that giving our co-workers praise and recognition when warranted, regardless of who we are and our co-worker's title, is a nice thing to do and most of us certainly enjoy feeling appreciated. However, I don't think that physicians are required to thank nurses any extra.

Pangea Reunited, ASN, RN

Has 6 years experience.

Most of the things done by nurses described in this letter is called "doing your darn job".

That about sums it up. Having money to count when I go home is thanks enough.

Whispera, MSN, RN

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

While thanks and high-fives aren't necessary, I don't think anyone thinks those aren't nice when we get them...

I'm pretty darned appreciative of the docs, actually. They also have enormous responsibility and stress. And neither of us could do our jobs without the other.

TexMex22

Has 30 years experience.

Saw this today, thought it was interesting

Dear Doctor... - FearlessBlogging.com

You should. You should tell them. A nurse is always a patient advocate, but if you make your nurse feel valued and appreciated they will go the extra mile for you as well. A great nurse is worth their weight in gold, and if you realize this and have on in your life, the least you can do is tell them so.

How odd to write a note starting with Doctor's Appreciation Day coming up and then turning it into a demand for more attention and appreciate for yourself. I am honestly scratching my head on that one. It is kind of like luring someone in with the promise of something nice and then bonking them upside the head. Not going to do much to enhance the relationship between doctors and nurses.

I'll be blunt. What's her complaint? Nurses get a whole week of "appreciation" while the doctors, who went to med school for how many years and are the ones that actually diagnose and perform surgeries get only a day. She wants the doctors to "high five her" and "pat her on the back". When was the last time she did that for a doctor I wonder.