Considering Quitting My Job- Had Enough (Kind of a Vent Post)

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Specializes in Med-Surg, Developmental Disorders. Has 9 years experience.

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I normally work PRN. For the past month, I've been working full time plus overtime covering a nurse who went out on FMLA. So, I picked up a whole bunch of extra hours at the last minute since there was nobody else who could do it.

I felt sick Tuesday and Wednesday (not Covid). So, on Tuesday, I worked through it but called out for Wednesday. Also went to the doctor's on Wednesday and submitted the doctor's note. They prescribed medications with some not-so-fun side effects, so pretty much slept all day Wednesday and Thursday. My supervisor emailed me on my personal email and said that calling out Wednesday violated their attendance policy and is an unexcused absence.

I said if that's the case, I don't want to keep working full time hours plus overtime and risk accumulating unexcused absences every time I get sick (I do have a long-standing health issue that doesn't usually result in absences, but occasionally it does). I didn't hear anything back until my next scheduled shift, which was on Friday.

When I went in Friday, I had a note from my supervisor on my work email saying that she was unclear if I was still planning to come in Friday. We can't access our work email when we aren't at work. Unless you're a supervisor, it can only be done through the work computers. I heard from coworkers that the supervisor was asking THEM on Wednesday if I planned to be in Friday. 

Supervisor never tried to contact me at any point on Wednesday or Thursday through my phone or personal email to clarify if I'd be in Friday. She has contacted me through both phone/text and personal email before, so she does have my contact information. I have a meeting with my supervisor Monday at 8:15 AM. I'm seriously thinking of leaving and letting them (fail to) handle their own (self-inflicted) staffing woes. What should I do?

Daisy4RN

Specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg. Has 20 years experience. 1 Article; 2,032 Posts

Did your supervisor say anything to you on the Friday you went back? Not there that day? I would do what ever works best for you; although, since you don’t know what the meeting is about you may not have an option anyway. Assuming you do I would go back to per diem if that is what you want. If you want to quit then quit, just be careful you are not cutting off your nose to spite your face, (But I do understand that feeling when it comes to some admin). 

sideshowstarlet, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Developmental Disorders. Has 9 years experience. 1 Article; 143 Posts

12 minutes ago, Daisy4RN said:

Did your supervisor say anything to you on the Friday you went back? Not there that day? I would do what ever works best for you; although, since you don’t know what the meeting is about you may not have an option anyway. Assuming you do I would go back to per diem if that is what you want. 

Thanks, Daisy4RN. I've stayed PRN this whole time. I just happen to be a PRN person working a ridiculous amount of hours. 

Supervisor wasn't there Friday. I saw the email when I came in Friday morning. 

Not really sure what I want, though I'd really like to be free of this hospital. Every day, we have in-person rounds in a tiny room that has a sign on the door that says "Covid precautions: room capacity: 10 people." And every day, there's closer to 20 people in that room, between providers, nurses, outside consultants, and random members of administration with nothing better to do. And Covid spread in my area is increasing.

Due to Covid surge, everybody is getting their time off denied, unless they got it approved before the Covid surge. I understand that, but how am I supposed to predict when I'll get sick? I'm honestly surprised I haven't gotten Covid from this hospital yet. 

Daisy4RN

Specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg. Has 20 years experience. 1 Article; 2,032 Posts

So did your absences actually violate the policy if you are still per diem? I am guessing maybe bc even though per diem you were scheduled full time? I would check that. I worked per diem and like you had full time hours but was still under per diem rules which were different.  Either way I wouldn’t be happy about the way they are handling it. You stepped in to fill a need and are catching s*** bc you were sick. I get Covid but most places had ridiculous policies re: sick calls/pay even before Covid. I would just do whatever works best for you bc admin most definitely does what works best for them/the facility. Good luck!

sideshowstarlet, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Developmental Disorders. Has 9 years experience. 1 Article; 143 Posts

30 minutes ago, Daisy4RN said:

So did your absences actually violate the policy if you are still per diem? I am guessing maybe bc even though per diem you were scheduled full time? I would check that. I worked per diem and like you had full time hours but was still under per diem rules which were different. 

The supervisor said it's a violation since I agreed to cover the full-timer on FMLA and this would have been one of her shifts if she were here. But then again, my supervisor sometimes tells... Interesting stories. But yeah probably, since I was already scheduled for this shift 

Edited by sideshowstarlet
Added clarification

Lynker, LPN

Specializes in LTC, Rehab. Has 3 years experience. 219 Posts

29 minutes ago, sideshowstarlet said:

The supervisor said it's a violation since I agreed to cover the full-timer on FMLA and this would have been one of her shifts if she were here. But then again, my supervisor sometimes tells... Interesting stories. But yeah probably, since I was already scheduled for this shift 

By this logic, would they expect the full-timer to never get sick or need a day off?

This job sounds shifty. It's a big no from me. 🤷‍♂️

sideshowstarlet, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Developmental Disorders. Has 9 years experience. 1 Article; 143 Posts

3 minutes ago, Lynker said:

By this logic, would they expect the full-timer to never get sick or need a day off?

This job sounds shifty. It's a big no from me. 🤷‍♂️

LOL, hopefully not, as the full-timer is currently on FMLA. They are so ridiculous.

ThePrincessBride, BSN

Specializes in Med-Surg, NICU. Has 7 years experience. 1 Article; 2,467 Posts

I have a PRN job and I work the bare minimum. If I want more hours, I pick up  the day of or day before so there is little to no chance of a call off.

If I were you, I'd pick up on the days or day before you plan to work. It sucks that you could work full-time as a contingent but be held by contingent standards in terms of call offs.

morelostthanfound, BSN

Specializes in CVOR/General/Transplant Surgery, and cat herding. Has 30 years experience. 268 Posts

    I've been per diem at several hospitals and though there was sometimes a minimum, monthly, work requirement, there was never a penalty for calling out on extra scheduled days.  I seriously doubt this is really your employer's policy and your manager sounds passive-aggressive and ineffectual.  I would pull back next schedule, work the very minimum number of hours, and look for greener pastures.

Emergent, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 29 years experience. 2 Articles; 3,860 Posts

This is complete and utter hogwash, pure and simple. What total ineptitude and lack of basic communication skills on the part of your supervisor. 

kp2016

Has 20 years experience. 416 Posts

14 hours ago, sideshowstarlet said:

I normally work PRN. For the past month, I've been working full time plus overtime covering a nurse who went out on FMLA. So, I picked up a whole bunch of extra hours at the last minute since there was nobody else who could do it.

When I went in Friday, I had a note from my supervisor on my work email saying that she was unclear if I was still planning to come in Friday. We can't access our work email when we aren't at work. Unless you're a supervisor, it can only be done through the work computers. I heard from coworkers that the supervisor was asking THEM on Wednesday if I planned to be in Friday. 

Supervisor never tried to contact me at any point on Wednesday or Thursday through my phone or personal email to clarify if I'd be in Friday. She has contacted me through both phone/text and personal email before, so she does have my contact information. I have a meeting with my supervisor Monday at 8:15 AM. I'm seriously thinking of leaving and letting them (fail to) handle their own (self-inflicted) staffing woes. What should I do?

A couple of things. If you are PRN you don't suddenly become Full time because you picked up a heap of extra shifts. Did they suddenly pay you benefits? I'm going to answer my own question with, I don't think so. So by extension the Full time policy doesn't suddenly apply to you, your usual Part time one does. The only exception would be if you signed some sort of bonus contract which stipulated extra money was tied to not calling out sick, which I think you would have mentioned.

Given that your manager who has previously demonstrated that they had no trouble contacting you outside work is suddenly choosing to not utilize your private email / number and is instead asking for work place gossip re your intention of working I'm thinking they are well aware that you haven't violated the official policy. 

Having said all that, the scheduled meeting on Monday leads me to think your manager is going to be petty about this. I would ask HR for a written copy of the sick call policy and take it with you to the meeting. (I have taken to saving this when I receive it during orientation)

I think you can expected to be either guilt- tripped for calling our sick and/ or given a written warning. I would not sign any of that other than to write a note on it stating that I disagree with this statement and a brief summary of the details including that you are PRN status and supplied a written Doctors note.

I would also take this as a clear sign you should never sign up for anymore that you can handle without jeopardizing your own health, its just not worth it and far from being thanked for your efforts you will just be taken advantage of. 

sideshowstarlet, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Developmental Disorders. Has 9 years experience. 1 Article; 143 Posts

6 hours ago, morelostthanfound said:

 ... and your manager sounds passive-aggressive and ineffectual. 

OMG, yes! You have no idea!