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Chloraprep

Posted

I have seen ob physician prep abdomen for c-section with chloraprep WITHOUT sterile gloves or any gloves for that matter. I also witnessed a nurse prep a breast without sterile gloves on:eek: also... is this actually ok?!!??

WSU_Ally_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU for 4 years, now PICU for 3 years!. Has 7 years experience.

I don't work OB, but in the MICU. For all our procedures (arterial lines, central lines, etc) our docs use a chloraprep before getting sterile. After they are sterile, they chloraprep again. Are you sure you just miss them doing it again after they are sterile??

I believe that you should be in gloves and gown especially when doing a procedure.

Also, I was under the understanding that Chloraprep should not be done when electrocautery was going to be used, such as in the C Section or any other surgery. We use Chloroprep for procedures such as central lines, Cath and EP studies.

I don't think it is that big of deal as long as the physician didn't touch the end that touched the patient. That happens a lot in trauma, and I have seen it happen in the different hospitals that I travel to. As long as the sponge stays sterile shouldn't matter. Hope this helps with your anxiety. Have a good day!

rbyrdrn

Specializes in Emergency. Has 6 years experience.

Our docs & myself often prep then don sterile gloves.

micco

Specializes in OR.

chloraprep is used for surgery and can be applied without sterile gloves on. like any skin prep containing alcohol, chloraprep must dry before drapes are applied. where I work now, chloraprep is what most general surgeons use.

Also, I was under the understanding that Chloraprep should not be done when electrocautery was going to be used, such as in the C Section or any other surgery. We use Chloroprep for procedures such as central lines, Cath and EP studies.

Chloraprep is used on a routine basis for pre-procedure antisepsis in and out of the OR. Regardless of electrocautery.

Aneroo, LPN

Specializes in Cath Lab, OR, CPHN/SN, ER.

I believe that you should be in gloves and gown especially when doing a procedure.

Also, I was under the understanding that Chloraprep should not be done when electrocautery was going to be used, such as in the C Section or any other surgery. We use Chloroprep for procedures such as central lines, Cath and EP studies.

Chloraprep contains alcohol, therefore it should be dry before using cautery, to decrease the risk of fire.

I don't think it is that big of deal as long as the physician didn't touch the end that touched the patient. That happens a lot in trauma, and I have seen it happen in the different hospitals that I travel to. As long as the sponge stays sterile shouldn't matter. Hope this helps with your anxiety. Have a good day!

I agree with bolded. If they're using betadine paint and scrub, where they are much closer to the skin and could easily touch it, then yes, they should be wearing sterile gloves and then gown and reglove after prep.

ETA- There are also different sizes of chloroprep. The large containers (26ml) are to be used from the neck down (I guess not an issue for you guys unless it's a central line, but we use them in the OR a lot), b/c of the alcohol content. If it's a head or neck surgery, we use a smaller (10ml?) container.

Chloraprep should be used in most surgical cases due to active ingerdents. The most important items to remember with chloraprep is that it is a scrub not a paint, it can be applied without wearing gloves if you want your hand to be dyed, and always remember to let it dry for 3 minutes prior to draping the patient. If you don't allow it to dry your patients can develop a rash related to the alcohol in the prep. We have seen a lot of patients that it was not allowed to dry and the sticky drapes were applied and during the patients 2week check up they had a terrible rash in the area the sticky drapes.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

When we do C/S, the circulating nurse is the one who preps the patient. She is not sterile at any time during the procedure. It's absolutely fine, as long as the person is not touching the prepped area after it's been prepped.