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Challenging boards?

Posted

Specializes in Med-Surg/Oncology/Telemetry/ICU.

quick question....there's an aide at my hospital that challenged the lvn boards and passed. trouble is, she doesn't have any experience, etc. she's going to start applying for lvn positions and use it to get into an r.n. program (which i totally understand since it's so hard to get in anywhere and being an lvn would help!). but is it safe for her to work?

any thoughts?

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

Where do you live? I am hearing that this practice is popular in California, where an aide can challenge NCLEX-PN with a few courses. Of course, I say that it is not safe for her to work, but who am I??

donsterRN, ASN, BSN

Specializes in Cardiac Care. Has 10 years experience.

I didn't know that was possible. I thought that in order to sit for any NCLEX (RN or PN), one first had to graduate from an approved school of nursing. I've not heard of challenging that exam.

I would think that clinical experience (so many hours in school) would be a requirement in order to sit for the test.

Shows what I don't know!

txspadequeenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, PICC Nurse, Nursing Supervisor. Has 20 years experience.

are you in ca. that is the only state that i know of that allows non- nursing students or military medics to sit for the exam w/o attending nursing school... i think it is very unsafe..but who am i

nursekatie22, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg/Oncology/Telemetry/ICU.

you guys are good!!! :D yup, i'm in california. i didn't know you could do that with the lvn boards and i hope you can't do that with the rn boards! i'm happy that this might make it easier for her to get into a registered nursing program, but i was just wondering about the whole thing cause i thought it was a little weird since she's planning on working....:uhoh3:

you guys are good!!! :D yup, i'm in california. i didn't know you could do that with the lvn boards and i hope you can't do that with the rn boards! i'm happy that this might make it easier for her to get into a registered nursing program, but i was just wondering about the whole thing cause i thought it was a little weird since she's planning on working....:uhoh3:

no state will allow you to challenge the rn boards, and i am unsure if she will be able to enter an rn class without transcript approval (which she won't have). she may just have to stay an lpn (not that there is anything wrong with that, just saying her plan may not work and even if she does gain acceptance to an rn school she needs to contact the board to see if she will be eligible to sit for the nclex).

njbikernurse

Specializes in LTC, Sub-acute, correctional.

This is the most cukoo thing I have ever heard. I remember being nervous my first day practicing as an LPN because I felt like I didn't learn ENOUGH in school. How can you do it WITHOUT going to school? Just because you can pick out the right answers on the NCLEX doesn't mean you really comprehend all the theory behind the right answer. I mean, you could just be lucky..........

txspadequeenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, PICC Nurse, Nursing Supervisor. Has 20 years experience.

:yeahthat:

This is the most cukoo thing I have ever heard. I remember being nervous my first day practicing as an LPN because I felt like I didn't learn ENOUGH in school. How can you do it WITHOUT going to school? Just because you can pick out the right answers on the NCLEX doesn't mean you really comprehend all the theory behind the right answer. I mean, you could just be lucky..........

teeituptom, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER, ICU, L&D, OR.

Where do you live? I am hearing that this practice is popular in California, where an aide can challenge NCLEX-PN with a few courses. Of course, I say that it is not safe for her to work, but who am I??

Not just a few courses, but also time served in served in the right areas. Common for Corpsman to challenge when they get out.

teeituptom, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER, ICU, L&D, OR.

are you in ca. that is the only state that i know of that allows non- nursing students or military medics to sit for the exam w/o attending nursing school... i think it is very unsafe..but who am i

medics and corpsman with the right experience should be allowed to sit for lpn boards in any state, they have earned the right.

txspadequeenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, PICC Nurse, Nursing Supervisor. Has 20 years experience.

what i meant was cna's taking the nclex-pn being unsafe not military medics..sorry for the confusion

medics and corpsman with the right experience should be allowed to sit for lpn boards in any state, they have earned the right.

If I remember right, if you challenged the boards the way others described (being a medic etc), you won't be able to practice in any other state except for California. Might be not in your best interest for the future.

RussA, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg.

There are several states that accept license from California that is gained by military members taking the NCLEX-PN. I sat on the NCLEX-PN in 2001 and was licensed in California, and I was able to gain reciprocity and gain New Mexico licensure in 2004. I would have been able to do the same in NC, W.VA, and two other states that I can't recall. California did allow (2004), Independent Duty AF personnel with hospital/in-patient skill-set to sit on the NCLEX-RN. Also, I have met an Army medic that gained his LPN in Texas, and enter nursing programs as an LPN to later sit for the NCLEX-RN in a year.

There are corpsman/medics performing task in the military that surpass basic LPN skills - so having them challenge and work in the civilian sector IS (as safe or more so) safe. One just need to know their own weaknesses and limitations.

RussA, practicing RN....and still continue to learn

Hello all and hoping someone answers this question. I have recently retired from the military and worked for 16 years as a medic. I live close on the Arizona/California border and want to challenge either state's boards. I was wondering if anyone new how the process works and if any tips can be passed my way.

Thanks again

Zeus

RussA, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg.

To be allowed to sit for the NCLEX-PN examination - See Method #4 for military. The website for California Bureau of Vocational Nursing and Psychiatric Technician (BVNPT) is:

http://www.bvnpt.ca.gov/Licensing/Forms.asp

NOTE: You need at least 12-month "bedside" experience.

If you have specific questions, you can contact BVNPT, information can be found at http://www.bvnpt.ca.gov/Contact.asp

Are you planning to reside and practice in California? This method of obtaining a LVN/LPN license is not recognized in many states. Things change, and State legislatures/Board of Nursing can restrict reciprocity - I would check requirements for the state you plan to practice before going this route. BTW what branch of service/MOS/AFSC?

I was too busy doing my job as a CNA to gain the knowledge of an LPN! Good Lord, this scares me.

So...you can take a position as a CNA, work and be paid for 12 months and then sit for the boards. Wow.

RussA, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg.

Shelley304,

In the military, a medic receive specialized training that provide skill/knowledge that include skill-sets that is comparable to an LVN. The 12-month requirement for bedside does not equate to CNA duties. Depending on branch of service and duty location - medics can be seen doing NGT, IV, foleys, EKGs, cast/splints, etc. Advance skills obtained for some of these medics provide them to work independently (within protocols) that have them diagnosing, treating, and prescribing.

- So, when presenting military credentials of experience to the board, the submitter provides the skill-knowledge/skill-sets that is gained from AT LEAST 12 months beside experience to be considered.

Shelley304,

In the military, a medic receive specialized training that provide skill/knowledge that include skill-sets that is comparable to an LVN. The 12-month requirement for bedside does not equate to CNA duties. Depending on branch of service and duty location - medics can be seen doing NGT, IV, foleys, EKGs, cast/splints, etc. Advance skills obtained for some of these medics provide them to work independently (within protocols) that have them diagnosing, treating, and prescribing.

- So, when presenting military credentials of experience to the board, the submitter provides the skill-knowledge/skill-sets that is gained from AT LEAST 12 months beside experience to be considered.

Thanks Russ! Medics I understand. A CNA with 12 months experience...

no way! I learn something new each day. I just cannot fathom this is acceptable. Licensed professionals are so up in arms about Certified Medical Assistants. I will not be surprised when being able to challange (as a LPN) RN boards becomes a reality. I got the new issue of Advance for LPNs and it is really being pushed for.

Good post-good info. See? I learned something new!

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