Can a second degree student apply for a Traditional BSN?

Students Pre-Nursing

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Can a second degree student apply for a Traditional BSN?

I have a Ph.D. in political science, and I am preparing for a career transition to become a nurse.

I know many second degree students enter into the Accelerated BSN program. However, coming from a different field, I would like to take my time learning nursing. I know I am not thriving in a fast-paced learning environment.

So, my question is: Is it possible for a second degree applicant to apply for a traditional BSN?

I am considering to enroll in a community college and transfer to traditional BSN program. Is it an option available for a second degree student like me?

londonflo

2,906 Posts

Specializes in oncology.

Yes, you can take a community college course of study in a traditional setting. The problem can be getting loans for another Associate/BSN program. I wrote a long answer for someone who had a bio degree about this yesterday. If you look at my previous posts (by clicking on my name) there is some practice wisdom. Best wishes as you pursue this. There are many Registered Nurses who are Registered voters and actively vote. You would be a great asset to the field, even going so far as running for office. 

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

2 Articles; 1,689 Posts

Specializes in Psychiatric and Mental Health NP (PMHNP).

I did an ABSN.  It's not that bad, depending on the length of the program.  Some are only 13 months, which is insane.  However, there are others that are 16-18 mos, which is quite doable.

Yes, you can get financial aid for an ABSN.  I did.

https://nursing.duke.edu/ABSN-admitted-and-returning-student-financial-aid-faqs

Another option is a direct-entry MSN.  This is for individuals who already have a bachelor's degree in a non-nursing subject.

A community college ADN is certainly an option.  If you are a state resident, this is the most affordable route.  At least in Calif, community colleges are very affordable.  As for financial aid, you'll have to ask the college.  

If you complete the ADN program, then work as an RN, many employers will pay for part or all of  the cost of a bridge program to earn a BSN.  Even without aid, if you are working as an RN, you should be able to afford a bridge program.

Best wishes.

 

Lipoma, BSN, RN

293 Posts

Specializes in SRNA.
FullGlass said:

I did an ABSN.  It's not that bad, depending on the length of the program.  Some are only 13 months, which is insane.  However, there are others that are 16-18 mos, which is quite doable.

 

Mine was 12 months and I went insane a few times LOL. Still recommend it for those who just want to get in and get out. There was another local program that was 11 months. 

As for the OP, yes, you can apply to traditional BSN but I don't know why anyone would want to suffer another 4 years for a second BS. Taking all those fluff courses...yikes. Buckle down for 12-15 months and get it out the way. Time spent in school is a potential loss of income - approximately $120K+

londonflo

2,906 Posts

Specializes in oncology.
Helen Lee said:

 

 

Quote

 have a Ph.D. in political science, and I am preparing for a career transition to become a nurse.

I know many second degree students enter into the Accelerated BSN program. However, coming from a different field, I would like to take my time learning nursing. I know I am not thriving in a fast-paced learning environment.

I have taught many students who came with significant credentials such as yours. You do not need to divulge nor explain your reason to be in the program. I am sorry I missed you not wanting to be in an ABSN program.  You learn so much on nursing and  the application of nursing during your 4 years  that there is no reason to do a 'speed' course.  

marylandmom

3 Posts

Yes, there are many people who have done a second bachelor's in nursing. In my state, our flagship program is only two years for a B.S.N. Students generally enter the program with an Associate's degree that includes the nursing prerequisites or they enter with a previously earned BA or BS plus the prerequisites that they need.

JustDandy

23 Posts

Hi Helen,

You have my curiosity. There are many different options for someone like you and people enter nursing as a second career all the time, but I'm very curious why you want to join nursing after spending so much time getting a Ph.D. in political science? I imagine that degree is in high demand at the moment. With your Ph.D. you are at the top in your field and by joining nursing you will be at the very bottom again. Healthcare is extremely hierarchical. Do you know what specialty you are interested in?

Nursing will likely be a culture shock for you if you haven't practiced in healthcare before. I was a second degree student when I started and several of my classmates either had doctorates or were well accomplished in other fields. The lack of respect, abuse and pure misogyny was a shock for me. Regardless of any other previous achievements or education, once you become a nurse be prepared to be treated like you are as dumb as dirt. The job itself can be wonderful. Caring for other humans can be very fulfilling, but there is a reason people are leaving in droves. 

londonflo

2,906 Posts

Specializes in oncology.
Lipoma said:

Taking all those fluff courses...yikes.

Can you give me an example of FLUFF courses?

JustDandy

23 Posts

A BSN is a BSN whether accelerated or not. The same clinical and course requirements apply, it's just that some programs give you credit for work already completed and provide a compressed timeline. You still have "fluff" courses, which aren't fluff. The fluff courses, assuming you mean non-clinical courses, help you understand the system in which you work.

londonflo

2,906 Posts

Specializes in oncology.
JustDandy said:

You still have "fluff" courses, which aren't fluff. 

The why call them 'fluff'.

 

JustDandy said:

The fluff courses, assuming you mean non-clinical courses, help you understand the system in which you work.

These courses are so much more than 'understanding the system in which you work'. 

Sociology helps you understand the person, their struggles, their role in society, how a community functions,  how children adapt or non adapt in school.  Psychology gives you a basic understanding of the origin of actions by a person. And there are many more courses that make up "an educated person".  The bachelors degree was created to make educated individuals who will benefit society. Your graduation gown for a bachelors has open sleeves to show you have mastered the basic curriculum of an educated person and are 'open' to benefitting society. 

 

LindaGracie, ADN, BSN

4 Articles; 40 Posts

Specializes in geriatric, home health.

From my understanding the accelerated BSN is for associate degree RNs to get their BSN. I did this. All the courses are nursing courses in the RN-BSN program. In the traditional BSN program, you definitely shouldn't have to take any of those core courses such as English or history. The only courses should be the science classes and maybe statistics if you haven't already taken it. I have a master's degree in counseling and went back to a technical school for nursing. I did have to take algebra because I didn't take college algebra. Other than that all my other courses were anatomy, Microbiology and the nursing courses.

Helen Lee

2 Posts

JustDandy said:

Hi Helen,

You have my curiosity. There are many different options for someone like you and people enter nursing as a second career all the time, but I'm very curious why you want to join nursing after spending so much time getting a Ph.D. in political science? I imagine that degree is in high demand at the moment. With your Ph.D. you are at the top in your field and by joining nursing you will be at the very bottom again. Healthcare is extremely hierarchical. Do you know what specialty you are interested in?

Thank you for your question! I greatly appreciate your concern about the potential culture shock I might encounter.

There are several reasons why I am considering changing my career and entering the nursing field, but the most decisive factor was my experience as a caregiver for my father, who had brain cancer.

I quit my job and took care of him for over three years. He passed away a year ago. It was the most intense period of my life, both mentally and physically.

When he was first diagnosed with brain cancer, I knew nothing about the disease. It made me feel helpless and frustrated that we had to face the disease without any knowledge and that we had to communicate with busy doctors who rarely fully addressed our burning questions.

We were dragged around for numerous tests and operations. Despite undergoing three radiation surgeries, the disease rapidly worsened each time.

Nurses played a significant role during this process. Their assistance was crucial as they spent the most time with the patient, providing necessary knowledge and care up close.

I am interested in becoming a Clinical Nurse Specialist and conducting research for a better nursing environment, but I want to consider that after gaining experience as an RN.

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