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Bored after 3 months?

Rehabilitation   (2,372 Views 18 Comments)
by saradista saradista (New Member) New Member

560 Visitors; 7 Posts

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SummerGarden has 10 years experience and works as a Assistant Dept Manager.

5 Likes; 36,030 Visitors; 2,978 Posts

So here's my situation. I worked on a med surg unit at a big city hospital for six months and hated it. I loved the work and patient population, but the environment was quite literally traumatizing.

In general, acute care is the same no matter what floor you work; acute care is fast paced and the expectations are high. There is always going to be some aspect that you will not like and may even hate. It is not to say that some environments are not toxic, but toxic work environments usually have a high turnover rate of experience nurses and/or new nurses to the unit... Was that your former work environment? If not, I think you will run into many of the challenges you hated in your former M/S job in the ICU, ED, Cardiac Step Down, etc..

Also, as others have already written, you should stick out this job for a year, which you do not hate (bored is different than hate) before you start applying for acute care positions again to be taken seriously by employers. Whatever you find in acute care you need to stick that position out for at least 2-3 years even if it is not an ICU or ED. Only time working as a nurse in acute care (no matter the setting) will tell you the truth about yourself so you can make clear career choices based upon your personal work experience.

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Tenebrae has 6 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse in Gerontology.

143 Likes; 10,322 Visitors; 1,378 Posts

I get where you're coming from, being bored and not using critical thinking skills. That's how I felt when I've worked on med/surg and tele floors. I loved my co workers but the work was boring and mind numbing.

.

FYI critical thinking is not the exclusive domain of the ICU/critical care nurse

Any half decent nurse should always be utilising their critical thinking skills regardless of their speciality

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560 Visitors; 7 Posts

I appreciate you taking the time to respond. I had intended on staying at my med/surg job for a minimum of two years. The reason I left was because I was threatened by a coworker and HR/management did a poor job of investigating. But obviously on a resume it looks like I just peaced out after a few months. I also see how one may think my goals are all over the place. Pediatrics is an old passion of mine, that developed my first year of school. Flight training is another passion that developed through many discussions with my mentor at school. In some ways they don't seem related, but in others they are very related. Having that added pediatric experience isn't a requirement, but is an undeniable bonus. So that's where my thought process leads. I love my job and coming to work every day is great, I just feel I've aready exhausted all of my options when it comes to building myself into a better RN. I can take on all the extra roles, join all the committees, but if I feel like I'm not challenging myself, then that can't be a good sign. It's just not my niche is all. The point of me asking this question is because I need feedback from other RNs who have maybe been in my position or can offer their advice. I'm the only person in my family working in this field, all my close friends are just as new to nursing as I am, and I don't want to ask more experienced coworkers because I don't want word to get out I'm already looking to jump ship (which right now I'm not, but you can understand how things get flipped around from one conversation to the next).

My boyfriend (also an RN) brought up a great idea of applying for that peds position and staying on in my rehab job as PRN. My CNO and I have a great relationship, I've worked with her not only at my current job but also at the hospital I worked at as a PCT. So it's not all that ridiculous to follow her to the hospital she's moving to. I wouldn't plan on applying earlier than September since by then I'll have six months at my rehab position. At least that doesn't look as bad as quitting after only 3 months? Any thoughts?

Also, I love all the feedback I've gotten. Everything's been mostly positive and constructive. That makes it a lot easier to accept outside opinions haha

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560 Visitors; 7 Posts

FYI critical thinking is not the exclusive domain of the ICU/critical care nurse

Any half decent nurse should always be utilising their critical thinking skills regardless of their speciality

I don't think that's what amzyRN meant, and I think you know that too. She was just trying to be empathetic to my situation. Please, let's keep the posts polite.

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Tenebrae has 6 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse in Gerontology.

143 Likes; 10,322 Visitors; 1,378 Posts

I don't think that's what amzyRN meant, and I think you know that too. She was just trying to be empathetic to my situation. Please, let's keep the posts polite.

I deal with a-lot of nurses who assume that critical thinking could not possibly occur outside of the acute environment.

So please dont tell me what I know or dont know, especially when its coming from personal experience.

Was that polite enough for you?

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traumaRUs has 25 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

466 Likes; 14 Followers; 127 Articles; 184,822 Visitors; 20,484 Posts

Please note - sometimes online communication is misinterpreted. Without the nonverbal cues and facial expressions, its easy to be misunderstood.

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