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Blind Nursing Student?

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Music in My Heart

Specializes in being a Credible Source. Has 10 years experience.

I am not aware of any technology that would read something typed on this forum out loud to a blind person. If someone can read this forum, then they are not blind.
I was just about to type a post when I noted Donald's post which perfectly typifies my point:

Unless you are either (a) a blind nurse, or (b) an expert in adaptive technologies, or © an expert in what all constitutes the breadth and depth of the nursing field then you really have no clue as to whether it is or is not possible to become a licensed, practicing nurse despite being blind.

Donald's post is silly since text-to-voice is trivial technology and nearly ubiquitous.

Double-Helix, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU. Has 9 years experience.

Donald11's post was written over two years ago, when text-to-voice technology was much more primitive and certainly not widely available to anyone with a smart phone.

Music in My Heart

Specializes in being a Credible Source. Has 10 years experience.

Donald11's post was written over two years ago, when text-to-voice technology was much more primitive and certainly not widely available to anyone with a smart phone.
I was aware of the dating of Donald's post but the truth is, since WinXP, Microsoft's text-to-voice technology has been quite solid. My blind father had a desktop system which could "read" most web pages, and OCRd documents for that matter, in 2008.

That technology has been around for quite a long time.

Music in My Heart

Specializes in being a Credible Source. Has 10 years experience.

Donald11's post was written over two years ago, when text-to-voice technology was much more primitive and certainly not widely available to anyone with a smart phone.
I was quite aware of the date of Donald's post when I typed my reply... and it stands as typed.

Functional text-to-voice technology has been readily available for many years. Since WinXP, Microsoft has been giving away a very functional version with every license. In 2007, my blind father had a basic desktop system which would reliably read most web pages, most Word docs, and most OCRd documents without trouble. Sure, it sounded a little funny by comparison to more modern technology but it was entirely functional.

His post was every bit as misinformed when he wrote it as it would be if he'd have written it today.

"i am not aware of any technology that would read something typed on this forum out loud to a blind person. if someone can read this forum, then they are not blind."

get a mac. it will read out loud to you, and they don't charge for it. i also have a friend who is legally blind, in that his acuity is 20/1600 in one eye and 20/800 in the other. with magnifying lenses (and your trusty apple to magnify everything on the screen) he can do a lot-- he's online all day.

i am not blind but i am a lousy typist, and i do a lot of my typing with dragon dictate by nuance. great resource and will also read back to you prn.

BrandonLPN, LPN

Has 5 years experience.

I can think of several nursing jobs a blind nurse could do. Telephone nursing for one. But I'm at a loss as to how a blind student could ever complete clinicals or pass a skills test. How could a blind person assess a wound or complete a dressing change? This is something every single nurse MUST know how to do. How could a blind person insert a foley? If anyone can tell me how these could be done by a blind person, I'm all ears...

Preemie 2 RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in NICU Nurse. Has 2 years experience.

I cannot see out of my right eye at all and I am legally blind in my left eye without glasses/contacts. With contacts I am 20/30 and I was accepted into my school's nursing program with no problems. Of course I will never be without my glasses during school, clinicals though :)

VictoriaGayle

Has 1 years experience.

I don't think a blind person would make a bad nurse per se, but when I read about disabled people in nursing school I am always shocked. My program requires you to get a full physical, and the Dr./NP/PA has to sign on the physical that you can participate in the program with no limitations.

Just being pregnant I had to get a special release from my OBGYN in addition to the physical.

I was under the impression that if you can't fully participate in the program with out limitations you couldn't join.

Just to clarify, was this person completely blind, or legally blind? There is a pretty big difference.

Stephalump

Specializes in Forensic Psych. Has 2 years experience.

I didn't take my glasses to my pre-NS physical and I failed and had to go back when I could see clearly! Like others have said. I get that there are job possibilities for a blind nurse, but getting into/through school is what baffles me.

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