Biology degree???

Posted
by Joveal (New) New

Okay, lots of confusion and a big question. Okay so I'm in my first semester in college, also a freshman. Currently my major is biology medical science (pre med) And I've been thinking long and hard and praying and I'm starting to lean in the direction of doing nurse practitioner. So my question is, would I be able to have a bachelors in biology and still be on the right path to be a NP? And if so what steps should I take to get there im worried that I would have to turn around and major in nursing.

chevygirl1987

Specializes in Stepdown, PCCN. Has 10 years experience. 167 Posts

You can be an NP with a degree in bio, look up direct entry MSN programs. I am aware of these programs but don't know anyone from one personally. It seems that the experience you would get as a practicing nurse would be a benefit to practicing as a NP.

Since you are first semester, it would probably be better for you to change majors and go into nursing.

You could also complete your current degree then get a degree in nursing then look at NP schools which will take more time and money.

Dranger

1,871 Posts

Curious, why do you want to switch?

BiotoBSNtoFNP

249 Posts

I have a bachelors in biology. In my junior year I decided I wanted to go to nursing school. I finished my prereqs for nursing school while getting this degree. Then I completed an accelerated BSN -typically they are 1-2 years long. Then I began NP school.

I could have applied to a direct entry MSN program after undergrad however I realized that it was important to me (and my career) to get RN experience prior to getting my MSN.

If you are sure you want nursing, look into switching majors from biology into nursing since you are still early in your schooling. Having a BS in biology has no relevance to nursing employers, however I did find that I was well prepared for nursing school with my science background.

PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry. 1,413 Posts

I would suggest that you figure out why you want to switch life paths. I love that you're a biology major. There are not a lot of nurses with any kind of grounding in biology. Unfortunately to become a nurse practitioner you will first have to become a registered nurse. There are a couple of ways of doing this and one is a direct entry master's program that will yield nurse practitioner training. I think that would be your best bet if you are in a region where you can obtain such a degree economically. However if you must become a RN and a traditional sense that I would suggest you do it through a fast-paced second BSN program or accelerated program. These options are also limited however I believe that this would be the fastest route for a person who has a strong science background. I think this would be the most efficient pathway for you.

Malia, FNP

2 Posts

If your goal is to be a NP, I would recommend you switch majors ASAP so that you can begin to focus on nursing. College is expensive and experience as a nurse is important when looking for a job as a new NP. Bio majors don't have a lot of options when it comes to making a dent on their school loans before heading to grad school, while nurses usually start at double the minimum wage. Also, if you change your mind and want to go to med school, optometry school, or any other healthcare related field after you graduate, you would only have to take a handful of prereqs to be ready to take the MCATs etc. Hence, a nursing degree gives you more options as well as focus, if you do end up becoming a NP.

BeachsideRN, ASN

Specializes in NICU, Trauma, Oncology. Has 8 years experience. 1,722 Posts

If your goal is to be a NP, I would recommend you switch majors ASAP so that you can begin to focus on nursing. College is expensive and experience as a nurse is important when looking for a job as a new NP. Bio majors don't have a lot of options when it comes to making a dent on their school loans before heading to grad school, while nurses usually start at double the minimum wage. Also, if you change your mind and want to go to med school, optometry school, or any other healthcare related field after you graduate, you would only have to take a handful of prereqs to be ready to take the MCATs etc. Hence, a nursing degree gives you more options as well as focus, if you do end up becoming a NP.

This. I so wish someone would have shook me and forced me to listen to this advice many years ago.

BeachsideRN, ASN

Specializes in NICU, Trauma, Oncology. Has 8 years experience. 1,722 Posts

The take home is you don't have to be a nurse after you get a BSN but in order to be a nurse you have to have an ASB/BSN/MSN

Hindsight is 20/20

Malia, FNP

2 Posts

Don't feel too badly, I have 3 daughters who were bio majors and I couldn't convince any of them to do nursing, until my fourth finally conceded. It took a LOT of convincing on my part. I don't think even a good shake would have worked with the prior 3 (stubborn genes they inherited from ME...), but at the same time, biology is a good foundation for any of the health care fields!

applesxoranges, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. 2,242 Posts

Direct entry np programs are harder to get into because they are fewer in number although it could also open you up to applying for a pa program. The direct entry MSN np programs probably receive a lot of applicants too. I would begin heavily researching it and seeing what the schools you would want to go to require.

There are ADN to MSN NP programs too. There are MSN programs that accept ADN students with a BS in something else. I did an ADN program and earned my BSN within 9 months (within 1 year of graduating). Six months later I applied for a MSN program and was accepted to two.